Wording of litany of the sacred heart
#1
LBrand new here, please help me to understand, in the litany of the sacred heart sometimes I see, “abyss of all virtues”, and sometimes “abyss of all virtue” singular. I initially learned it as singular, and i feel that this is more meaningful in its infinite flavour, as in, not a list, but an abyss of virtue period, without virtue being subdivided by types. Anyone feel me? Is there an official one way or the other answer to this? Seems kind of sloppy have it quoted different ways like that.
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#2
I don't know that there are any 'official' translations of the litanies and other older, traditional prayers, but it's singular in the official Latin.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

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#3
(02-04-2018, 03:41 PM)Habib Wrote: LBrand new here, please help me to understand, in the litany of the sacred heart sometimes I see, “abyss of all virtues”, and sometimes “abyss of all virtue” singular. I initially learned it as singular, and i feel that this is more meaningful in its infinite flavour, as in, not a list, but an abyss of virtue period, without virtue being subdivided by types. Anyone feel me? Is there an official one way or the other answer to this? Seems kind of sloppy have it quoted different ways like that.
Peace.....I have seen this before with words - whether in prayers or not - actually I have seen it with the word sin and sins - I have always thought it was just in who wrote up the paperwork and how they use their grammar.....not a serious problem I dont think.  angeltime
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