Sort of a strange question for those raised as Catholic, traditional or otherwise
#1
New to posting  . . . but lurking for a long time!

So kind of a strange question, but just interested in finding out other people's experiences.  But first, a little history . . .

I was raised Catholic in the US in the 1970s . . . my Catholic experience pretty much consisted of going to Mass  (N.O.) on Sunday and to Catholic school.  I remember saying the rosary ONCE in my entire time at Catholic school (12 years) and maybe going to confession a handful of times - this was usually through school (as my parents never encouraged it) and it was usually some sort of group penance service, that involved writing our sins on a piece of paper and bringing them to the altar to be burned.

And to be honest, I knew of no other Catholic families that were any different than ours . . . in fact, I considered our family the more devout Catholics because we actually attended Mass on Sunday, as a good percentage did not.

As I grew older, I sensed something was seriously amiss with my "modern-day" Catholicism, but had a hard time pinpointing the root.  This disorientation led me down a lot of false paths, but by the grace of God and the blessed intercession of Our Lady, a few years ago I finally found traditional Catholicism, and have not looked back. 

I have spent much time researching and restoring the traditions of Catholicism (many of which were entirely alien to me) that were absent from my childhood, and now have tried to pass them along to my own children.

In hindsight, I wondered I how considered myself "Catholic" for all those years;  it just seems like I was raised with some serious gaps in practicing the faith .  I do not blame my parents - my father passed long ago, and my mother's practice of the faith pretty much remains as it was in my childhood (though I did get her to go to Latin Mass with me at Christmas). 

Sorry that this is so lengthy, but I wanted to know what other people's experiences were compared to mine.   If you were raised Catholic in the 60s, 70s and 80s, were you raised like me, or more traditionally?  Did you pray the rosary, go to Adoration, live liturgically, celebrate All Saints Day instead of Halloween,  etc?  Just want to know if my experience was more the norm for young Catholics at that time.
I ask Jesus to cover me and my family in His most Precious Blood against any and all incursions of the evil one, in the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.  Amen.
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#2
(02-23-2018, 12:34 PM)SEDLIBERANOSAMALO Wrote: New to posting  . . . but lurking for a long time!

So kind of a strange question, but just interested in finding out other people's experiences.  But first, a little history . . .

I was raised Catholic in the US in the 1970s . . . my Catholic experience pretty much consisted of going to Mass  (N.O.) on Sunday and to Catholic school.  I remember saying the rosary ONCE in my entire time at Catholic school (12 years) and maybe going to confession a handful of times - this was usually through school (as my parents never encouraged it) and it was usually some sort of group penance service, that involved writing our sins on a piece of paper and bringing them to the altar to be burned.

And to be honest, I knew of no other Catholic families that were any different than ours . . . in fact, I considered our family the more devout Catholics because we actually attended Mass on Sunday, as a good percentage did not.

As I grew older, I sensed something was seriously amiss with my "modern-day" Catholicism, but had a hard time pinpointing the root.  This disorientation led me down a lot of false paths, but by the grace of God and the blessed intercession of Our Lady, a few years ago I finally found traditional Catholicism, and have not looked back. 

I have spent much time researching and restoring the traditions of Catholicism (many of which were entirely alien to me) that were absent from my childhood, and now have tried to pass them along to my own children.

In hindsight, I wondered I how considered myself "Catholic" for all those years;  it just seems like I was raised with some serious gaps in practicing the faith .  I do not blame my parents - my father passed long ago, and my mother's practice of the faith pretty much remains as it was in my childhood (though I did get her to go to Latin Mass with me at Christmas). 

Sorry that this is so lengthy, but I wanted to know what other people's experiences were compared to mine.   If you were raised Catholic in the 60s, 70s and 80s, were you raised like me, or more traditionally?  Did you pray the rosary, go to Adoration, live liturgically, celebrate All Saints Day instead of Halloween,  etc?  Just want to know if my experience was more the norm for young Catholics at that time.

I suspect your experiences would be the norm for most American Catholics then as well as now.  
I was born a "cradle Catholic" in 1975. I can remember Church back from around the age of 4 through the 1980s (my "formative years"). Mass was said in the vernacular language, although we sang a fair number of the hymns in Latin until I was about 10, or a little older (1985). I went to Catholic school in another city during 4th and 5th grades, otherwise my K-12 education was in public schools. I enjoyed Catholic school, but stopped going because of a combination of carpool problems/cost of tuition. 
I went to Mass once a week while I was there (Thursday) plus Mass on Sunday. Confession was fairly often; saying the Rosary, not so much. Back in public school, after Confirmation, as with so many teenagers my practice of the Faith became more lax, but beginning in my late twenties I began to fall back into regular practice (steady weekend Mass attendance, sometimes also during the week during vacations, a renewed practice of saying the Rosary, participation in Church activities outside of Mass). 
So that's me. Oh, and regular reading of the Bible (that was something I never really stopped, even after my initial laxity following Confirmation). 
I am glad you are not so hard on your parents, SEDLIB. I bet you picked up a lot more of the Faith just by being at Mass with your parents during your younger years than you think you did-- I think that is showing up now with your renewed focus on the Faith and teaching it to your children. 
I know, as I got older, that much of that "latent" Catholicism came back to me, hence my own renewed focus on the Faith these past 15 years (my personal renewal began at the age of 28, when for the first time I drank the Blood of Christ-- prior to that, I had only ever consumed Our Lord's Body --and yes, I know they are both equally effective, but for some reason the Holy Spirit was reignited in me when I drank the Blood of Jesus). 
I think it is normal for many people, SEDLIB, to have a renewed practice of the Faith when they get older, despite a perhaps "lukewarm" upbringing.
Congratulations, SEDLIB, on your own renewed journey!
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#3
(02-23-2018, 12:34 PM)SEDLIBERANOSAMALO Wrote: New to posting  . . . but lurking for a long time!

So kind of a strange question, but just interested in finding out other people's experiences.  But first, a little history . . .

I was raised Catholic in the US in the 1970s . . . my Catholic experience pretty much consisted of going to Mass  (N.O.) on Sunday and to Catholic school.  I remember saying the rosary ONCE in my entire time at Catholic school (12 years) and maybe going to confession a handful of times - this was usually through school (as my parents never encouraged it) and it was usually some sort of group penance service, that involved writing our sins on a piece of paper and bringing them to the altar to be burned.

And to be honest, I knew of no other Catholic families that were any different than ours . . . in fact, I considered our family the more devout Catholics because we actually attended Mass on Sunday, as a good percentage did not.

As I grew older, I sensed something was seriously amiss with my "modern-day" Catholicism, but had a hard time pinpointing the root.  This disorientation led me down a lot of false paths, but by the grace of God and the blessed intercession of Our Lady, a few years ago I finally found traditional Catholicism, and have not looked back. 

I have spent much time researching and restoring the traditions of Catholicism (many of which were entirely alien to me) that were absent from my childhood, and now have tried to pass them along to my own children.

In hindsight, I wondered I how considered myself "Catholic" for all those years;  it just seems like I was raised with some serious gaps in practicing the faith .  I do not blame my parents - my father passed long ago, and my mother's practice of the faith pretty much remains as it was in my childhood (though I did get her to go to Latin Mass with me at Christmas). 

Sorry that this is so lengthy, but I wanted to know what other people's experiences were compared to mine.   If you were raised Catholic in the 60s, 70s and 80s, were you raised like me, or more traditionally?  Did you pray the rosary, go to Adoration, live liturgically, celebrate All Saints Day instead of Halloween,  etc?  Just want to know if my experience was more the norm for young Catholics at that time.
Peace.....your journey and calling back to Tradition is more beautiful than you can see yourself - God bless, angeltime :incense:
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#4
(02-23-2018, 01:43 PM)gospel654 Wrote:
(02-23-2018, 12:34 PM)SEDLIBERANOSAMALO Wrote: New to posting  . . . but lurking for a long time!

So kind of a strange question, but just interested in finding out other people's experiences.  But first, a little history . . .

I was raised Catholic in the US in the 1970s . . . my Catholic experience pretty much consisted of going to Mass  (N.O.) on Sunday and to Catholic school.  I remember saying the rosary ONCE in my entire time at Catholic school (12 years) and maybe going to confession a handful of times - this was usually through school (as my parents never encouraged it) and it was usually some sort of group penance service, that involved writing our sins on a piece of paper and bringing them to the altar to be burned.

And to be honest, I knew of no other Catholic families that were any different than ours . . . in fact, I considered our family the more devout Catholics because we actually attended Mass on Sunday, as a good percentage did not.

As I grew older, I sensed something was seriously amiss with my "modern-day" Catholicism, but had a hard time pinpointing the root.  This disorientation led me down a lot of false paths, but by the grace of God and the blessed intercession of Our Lady, a few years ago I finally found traditional Catholicism, and have not looked back. 

I have spent much time researching and restoring the traditions of Catholicism (many of which were entirely alien to me) that were absent from my childhood, and now have tried to pass them along to my own children.

In hindsight, I wondered I how considered myself "Catholic" for all those years;  it just seems like I was raised with some serious gaps in practicing the faith .  I do not blame my parents - my father passed long ago, and my mother's practice of the faith pretty much remains as it was in my childhood (though I did get her to go to Latin Mass with me at Christmas). 

Sorry that this is so lengthy, but I wanted to know what other people's experiences were compared to mine.   If you were raised Catholic in the 60s, 70s and 80s, were you raised like me, or more traditionally?  Did you pray the rosary, go to Adoration, live liturgically, celebrate All Saints Day instead of Halloween,  etc?  Just want to know if my experience was more the norm for young Catholics at that time.

I suspect your experiences would be the norm for most American Catholics then as well as now.  
I was born a "cradle Catholic" in 1975. I can remember Church back from around the age of 4 through the 1980s (my "formative years"). Mass was said in the vernacular language, although we sang a fair number of the hymns in Latin until I was about 10, or a little older (1985). I went to Catholic school in another city during 4th and 5th grades, otherwise my K-12 education was in public schools. I enjoyed Catholic school, but stopped going because of a combination of carpool problems/cost of tuition. 
I went to Mass once a week while I was there (Thursday) plus Mass on Sunday. Confession was fairly often; saying the Rosary, not so much. Back in public school, after Confirmation, as with so many teenagers my practice of the Faith became more lax, but beginning in my late twenties I began to fall back into regular practice (steady weekend Mass attendance, sometimes also during the week during vacations, a renewed practice of saying the Rosary, participation in Church activities outside of Mass). 
So that's me. Oh, and regular reading of the Bible (that was something I never really stopped, even after my initial laxity following Confirmation). 
I am glad you are not so hard on your parents, SEDLIB. I bet you picked up a lot more of the Faith just by being at Mass with your parents during your younger years than you think you did-- I think that is showing up now with your renewed focus on the Faith and teaching it to your children. 
I know, as I got older, that much of that "latent" Catholicism came back to me, hence my own renewed focus on the Faith these past 15 years (my personal renewal began at the age of 28, when for the first time I drank the Blood of Christ-- prior to that, I had only ever consumed Our Lord's Body --and yes, I know they are both equally effective, but for some reason the Holy Spirit was reignited in me when I drank the Blood of Jesus). 
I think it is normal for many people, SEDLIB, to have a renewed practice of the Faith when they get older, despite a perhaps "lukewarm" upbringing.
Congratulations, SEDLIB, on your own renewed journey!

Interestingly enough, I actually left Catholicism for Protestantism for awhile.  It was my husband, a convert to Catholicism but somewhat lukewarm, who talked me into returning.  I told him that while I would be Catholic again, I was NEVER going to be one of THOSE crazy CATHOLICS who prayed the rosaries and said novenas.  HAHAHAHA . . .   God's plans our never our own!  And  while my husband got me to step foot in a Catholic church again, I do truly credit Our Lady's intercession (and possibly the pilgrimage to Chapel of the Miraculous Medal in Paris) with my own renewal.  God is good!
I ask Jesus to cover me and my family in His most Precious Blood against any and all incursions of the evil one, in the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.  Amen.
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#5
I am somewhat older than you but my experience growing up was almost exactly the same.  12 years of Catholic school with many nuns (still in habits until high school) but we were all poorly catechized.  I remember Mass before VII and the changes that came after VII.  Even as a child I liked the pre-VII better.   I believe that after VII the Sisters really didn't know what to teach us, so much changed so quickly.   We did Scouts thru Church, my brothers were altar boys, I sang in the Church choir - even played guitar for those Saturday evening guitar Masses - but I don't remember EVER reading the Bible at home or in school.  Mom was of the generation that believed that if you followed the rules, checked the right boxes (Mass on Sunday, check......Holy Days of Obligation, check) that made you Catholic.  We said the Rosary occasionally at school Mass and did the Stations of the Cross during Lent but it all felt mechanical or old-fashioned.  I liked it when the Church sanctuary was a bit dark, very quiet and mysterious and Holy, with glowing candles and Latin.
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I left the Church for several years but found my way back, did a lot of reading and praying - self education.  I spent some time with Protestant churches and found them to be shallow, happy-face, emotional, and, well, unsatisfying.    My daughters religious education (12 years Catholic school) was probably even worse than mine, she is not practicing.   Now the grandkids are in Sunday School/Catechism and it seems to be of better quality than mine.  And we are now at a parish with two great priests so we are lucky.  I miss the dark, quiet mysterious sanctuary, there is a lot of chatting before and after Mass now, no sense of the Holy.
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But I still fight the acedia inside.
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