Are thoughts of violence a mortal sin?
#11
The human mind can wander in all sorts of places where it shouldn't be before it is "caught" or "noticed." You're not fully culpable for what happens during this time, though confession and spiritual advisement would still be very helpful. We hope that through continual practice and by God's grace we can be rid of these pesky and potentially sinful mental habits.

If you've "caught" your mind in the act, and have deliberately chosen to carry on your revenge fantasy for the pleasure it gives you and despite the fact that you know there's something morally wrong about it, I would treat it like a mortal sin, yes.
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#12
(03-04-2018, 12:16 AM)For Petes Sake Wrote: My brother made me really angry yesterday and for a while I wanted to punch him in the face with the intention of injuring him. I feel like I couldn't really control these thoughts though. These thoughts ceased after 20 minutes or so.

It seems that you are trying to excuse yourself because you say you lack restraint regarding your thoughts.  It doesn't matter that you say you could not control yourself.  It is a mortal sin, for sure.  

Harming anyone out of anger, whether or not it was carried out or just in the heart, is a mortal sin.  Jesus says evil thoughts and impure thoughts are mortal sins.

Matthew 5:28  But I say to you, that whosoever shall look on a woman to lust after her, hath already committed adultery with her in his heart.   [The heart denotes a desire, to do something.]

I draw upon not my own opinion but Catholic teachings.

Seven deadly sins.  Pride, Envy, Lust, Anger, Greed, Sloth.

The Cardinal Virtues.  prudence, temperance, courage, justice

Temperance.  Temperance (virtue), habitual moderation or self-restraint in the indulgence of a natural appetite or passion.  [i.e. anger]

There is justified anger or indignation but not to the point of physical harm.  The only exception is self defense, for the preservation of one's own life.

Here is what scripture says about anger towards ones brother.  God uses the phrase "danger of the judgement" to signify the severity of the sin [mortal sin].  God compares anger against one's own brother with murder, i.e. mortal sin.  God says whoever says "Raca" to his brother shall be in danger of the council i.e. anathema.  Raca is a jewish word for contempt.  It is derived from a root meaning "to spit."

Matthew 5:21-24 [21] You have heard that it was said to them of old: Thou shalt not kill. And whosoever shall kill shall be in danger of the judgment. [22] But I say to you, that whosoever is angry with his brother, shall be in danger of the judgment. And whosoever shall say to his brother, Raca, shall be in danger of the council. And whosoever shall say, Thou Fool, shall be in danger of hell fire. [23] If therefore thou offer thy gift at the altar, and there thou remember that thy brother hath any thing against thee; [24] Leave there thy offering before the altar, and go first to be reconciled to thy brother: and then coming thou shalt offer thy gift.

Verses 23-24 are correlated to 1 Corinthians below.

1 Corinthians 11:27  Therefore whosoever shall eat this bread, or drink the chalice of the Lord unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and of the blood of the Lord.

To often, man is quick to excuse himself but his ways are not God's ways.
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#13
(03-06-2018, 07:34 PM)Luke3 Wrote:
(03-04-2018, 12:16 AM)For Petes Sake Wrote: My brother made me really angry yesterday and for a while I wanted to punch him in the face with the intention of injuring him. I feel like I couldn't really control these thoughts though. These thoughts ceased after 20 minutes or so.

It seems that you are trying to excuse yourself because you say you lack restraint regarding your thoughts.  It doesn't matter that you say you could not control yourself.  It is a mortal sin, for sure.  

Harming anyone out of anger, whether or not it was carried out or just in the heart, is a mortal sin.  Jesus says evil thoughts and impure thoughts are mortal sins.

Matthew 5:28  But I say to you, that whosoever shall look on a woman to lust after her, hath already committed adultery with her in his heart.   [The heart denotes a desire, to do something.]

I draw upon not my own opinion but Catholic teachings.

Seven deadly sins.  Pride, Envy, Lust, Anger, Greed, Sloth.

The Cardinal Virtues.  prudence, temperance, courage, justice

Temperance.  Temperance (virtue), habitual moderation or self-restraint in the indulgence of a natural appetite or passion.  [i.e. anger]

There is justified anger or indignation but not to the point of physical harm.  The only exception is self defense, for the preservation of one's own life.

Here is what scripture says about anger towards ones brother.  God uses the phrase "danger of the judgement" to signify the severity of the sin [mortal sin].  God compares anger against one's own brother with murder, i.e. mortal sin.  God says whoever says "Raca" to his brother shall be in danger of the council i.e. anathema.  Raca is a jewish word for contempt.  It is derived from a root meaning "to spit."

Matthew 5:21-24 [21] You have heard that it was said to them of old: Thou shalt not kill. And whosoever shall kill shall be in danger of the judgment. [22] But I say to you, that whosoever is angry with his brother, shall be in danger of the judgment. And whosoever shall say to his brother, Raca, shall be in danger of the council. And whosoever shall say, Thou Fool, shall be in danger of hell fire. [23] If therefore thou offer thy gift at the altar, and there thou remember that thy brother hath any thing against thee; [24] Leave there thy offering before the altar, and go first to be reconciled to thy brother: and then coming thou shalt offer thy gift.

Verses 23-24 are correlated to 1 Corinthians below.

1 Corinthians 11:27  Therefore whosoever shall eat this bread, or drink the chalice of the Lord unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and of the blood of the Lord.

To often, man is quick to excuse himself but his ways are not God's ways.
Peace.....it might be good for both you and your brother to have a talk and explain to him that these upsets cause you a lot of frustration and you become angry which you don't like doing - you would rather talk things out, work things out and if there is an explosion again, you will simply get up and leave the room to avoid any confrontation.  This might help!  God bless, angeltime :)
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#14
Quote:Article 3. Whether all anger is a mortal sin?
Objection 1. It would seem that all anger is a mortal sin. For it is written (Job 5:2): "Anger killeth the foolish man [Vulgate: 'Anger indeed killeth the foolish']," and he speaks of the spiritual killing, whence mortal sin takes its name. Therefore all anger is a mortal sin.

Objection 2. Further, nothing save mortal sin is deserving of eternal condemnation. Now anger deserves eternal condemnation; for our Lord said (Matthew 5:22): "Whosoever is angry with his brother shall be in danger of the judgment": and a gloss on this passage says that "the three things mentioned there, namely judgment, council, and hell-fire, signify in a pointed manner different abodes in the state of eternal damnation corresponding to various sins." Therefore anger is a mortal sin.

Objection 3. Further, whatsoever is contrary to charity is a mortal sin. Now anger is of itself contrary to charity, as Jerome declares in his commentary on Matthew 5:22, "Whosoever is angry with his brother," etc. where he says that this is contrary to the love of your neighbor. Therefore anger is a mortal sin.

On the contrary, A gloss on Psalm 4:5, "Be ye angry and sin not," says: "Anger is venial if it does not proceed to action."

I answer that, The movement of anger may be inordinate and sinful in two ways, as stated above (Article 2). First, on the part of the appetible object, as when one desires unjust revenge; and thus anger is a mortal sin in the point of its genus, because it is contrary to charity and justice. Nevertheless such like anger may happen to be a venial sin by reason of the imperfection of the act. This imperfection is considered either in relation to the subject desirous of vengeance, as when the movement of anger forestalls the judgment of his reason; or in relation to the desired object, as when one desires to be avenged in a trifling matter, which should be deemed of no account, so that even if one proceeded to action, it would not be a mortal sin, for instance by pulling a child slightly by the hair, or by some other like action. Secondly, the movement of anger may be inordinate in the mode of being angry, for instance, if one be too fiercely angry inwardly, or if one exceed in the outward signs of anger. On this way anger is not a mortal sin in the point of its genus; yet it may happen to be a mortal sin, for instance if through the fierceness of his anger a man fall away from the love of God and his neighbor.

Reply to Objection 1. It does not follow from the passage quoted that all anger is a mortal sin, but that the foolish are killed spiritually by anger, because, through not checking the movement of anger by their reason, they fall into mortal sins, for instance by blaspheming God or by doing injury to their neighbor.

Reply to Objection 2. Our Lord said this of anger, by way of addition to the words of the Law: "Whosoever shall kill shall be in danger of the judgment" (Matthew 5:21). Consequently our Lord is speaking here of the movement of anger wherein a man desires the killing or any grave injury of his neighbor: and should the consent of reason be given to this desire, without doubt it will be a mortal sin.

Reply to Objection 3. In the case where anger is contrary to charity, it is a mortal sin, but it is not always so, as appears from what we have said.
Blood of Christ, relief of the burdened, save us.

“It is my design to die in the brew house; let ale be placed in my mouth when I am expiring, that when the choirs of angels come, they may say, “Be God propitious to this drinker.” – St. Columbanus, A.D. 612
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#15
(03-06-2018, 09:28 PM)GangGreen Wrote:
Quote:Article 3. Whether all anger is a mortal sin?
Objection 1. It would seem that all anger is a mortal sin. For it is written (Job 5:2): "Anger killeth the foolish man [Vulgate: 'Anger indeed killeth the foolish']," and he speaks of the spiritual killing, whence mortal sin takes its name. Therefore all anger is a mortal sin.

Objection 2. Further, nothing save mortal sin is deserving of eternal condemnation. Now anger deserves eternal condemnation; for our Lord said (Matthew 5:22): "Whosoever is angry with his brother shall be in danger of the judgment": and a gloss on this passage says that "the three things mentioned there, namely judgment, council, and hell-fire, signify in a pointed manner different abodes in the state of eternal damnation corresponding to various sins." Therefore anger is a mortal sin.

Objection 3. Further, whatsoever is contrary to charity is a mortal sin. Now anger is of itself contrary to charity, as Jerome declares in his commentary on Matthew 5:22, "Whosoever is angry with his brother," etc. where he says that this is contrary to the love of your neighbor. Therefore anger is a mortal sin.

On the contrary, A gloss on Psalm 4:5, "Be ye angry and sin not," says: "Anger is venial if it does not proceed to action."

I answer that, The movement of anger may be inordinate and sinful in two ways, as stated above (Article 2). First, on the part of the appetible object, as when one desires unjust revenge; and thus anger is a mortal sin in the point of its genus, because it is contrary to charity and justice. Nevertheless such like anger may happen to be a venial sin by reason of the imperfection of the act. This imperfection is considered either in relation to the subject desirous of vengeance, as when the movement of anger forestalls the judgment of his reason; or in relation to the desired object, as when one desires to be avenged in a trifling matter, which should be deemed of no account, so that even if one proceeded to action, it would not be a mortal sin, for instance by pulling a child slightly by the hair, or by some other like action. Secondly, the movement of anger may be inordinate in the mode of being angry, for instance, if one be too fiercely angry inwardly, or if one exceed in the outward signs of anger. On this way anger is not a mortal sin in the point of its genus; yet it may happen to be a mortal sin, for instance if through the fierceness of his anger a man fall away from the love of God and his neighbor.

Reply to Objection 1. It does not follow from the passage quoted that all anger is a mortal sin, but that the foolish are killed spiritually by anger, because, through not checking the movement of anger by their reason, they fall into mortal sins, for instance by blaspheming God or by doing injury to their neighbor.

Reply to Objection 2. Our Lord said this of anger, by way of addition to the words of the Law: "Whosoever shall kill shall be in danger of the judgment" (Matthew 5:21). Consequently our Lord is speaking here of the movement of anger wherein a man desires the killing or any grave injury of his neighbor: and should the consent of reason be given to this desire, without doubt it will be a mortal sin.


Reply to Objection 3. In the case where anger is contrary to charity, it is a mortal sin, but it is not always so, as appears from what we have said.

"… yet it may happen to be a mortal sin, for instance if through the fierceness of his anger a man fall away from the love of God and his neighbor."

For Petes Sake quote.  "My brother made me really angry yesterday and for a while I wanted to punch him in the face with the intention of injuring him."

In charity, what he did is a mortal sin.  Also in truth and fairness, it must be said that saints are not given infallibility, they can make mistakes in good faith.  For instance, saints can be found to hold the complete opposite positions, one from the other.  

Saints are made saints because of a virtuous life.
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