St. Gregory Nazianzen
#1
Exclamation 
St. Gregory Nazianzen did not believe in baptism of desire or blood.  In fact he explicitly denied, disparaged and destroyed it!

St. Gregory Nazianzen; The Oration on Holy Baptism. #40

Preached at Constantinople Jan. 6, 381, being the day following the delivery of that on the Holy Lights [oration 39].

XXII. But then, you say, is not God merciful, and since He knows our thoughts and searches out our desires, will He not take the desire of Baptism instead of Baptism? You are speaking in riddles, if what you mean is that because of God's mercy the unenlightened is enlightened in His sight; and he is within the kingdom of heaven who merely desires to attain to it, but refrains from doing that which pertains to the kingdom. I will, however, speak out boldly my opinion on these matters; and I think that all other sensible men will range themselves on my side. Of those who have received the gift, some were altogether alien from God and from salvation, both addicted to all manner of sin, and desirous to be bad; others were semivicious, and in a kind of mean state between good and bad; others again, while they did that which was evil, yet did not approve their own action, just as men in a fever are not pleased with their own sickness. And others even before they were illuminated were worthy of praise; partly by nature, and partly by the care with which they prepared themselves for Baptism. These after their initiation became evidently better, and less liable to fall; in the one case with a view to procuring good, and in the other in order to preserve it. And among these, those who gave in to some evil are better than those who were altogether bad; and better still than those who yielded a little, are those who were more zealous, and broke up their fallow ground before Baptism; they have the advantage over the others of having already laboured; for the font does not do away with good deeds as it does with sins. But better even than these are they who are also cultivating the Gift, and are polishing themselves to the utmost possible beauty.

XXIII. And so also in those who fail to receive the Gift, some are altogether animal or bestial, according as they are either foolish or wicked; and this, I think, has to be added to their other sins, that they have no reverence at all for this Gift, but look upon it as a mere gift — to be acquiesced in if given them, and if not given them, then to be neglected. Others know and honour the Gift, but put it off; some through laziness, some through greediness. Others are not in a position to receive it, perhaps on account of infancy, or some perfectly involuntary circumstance through which they are prevented from receiving it, even if they wish. As then in the former case we found much difference, so too in this. They who altogether despise it are worse than they who neglect it through greed or carelessness. These are worse than they who have lost the Gift through ignorance or tyranny, for tyranny is nothing but an involuntary error. And I think that the first will have to suffer punishment, as for all their sins, so for their contempt of baptism; and that the second will also have to suffer, but less, because it was not so much through wickedness as through folly that they wrought their failure; and that the third will be neither glorified nor punished by the righteous Judge, as unsealed and yet not wicked, but persons who have suffered rather than done wrong. For not every one who is not bad enough to be punished is good enough to be honoured; just as not every one who is not good enough to be honoured is bad enough to be punished. And I look upon it as well from another point of view. If you judge the murderously disposed man by his will alone, apart from the act of murder, then you may reckon as baptized him who desired baptism apart from the reception of baptism. But if you cannot do the one how can you do the other? I cannot see it. Or, if you like, we will put it thus:— If desire in your opinion has equal power with actual baptism, then judge in the same way in regard to glory, and you may be content with longing for it, as if that were itself glory. And what harm is done you by your not attaining the actual glory, as long as you have the desire for it?

XXIV. Therefore since you have heard these words, come forward to it, and be enlightened, and your faces shall not be ashamed through missing the Grace. Receive then the Enlightenment in due season, that darkness pursue you not, and catch you, and sever you from the Illumining. 
http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/310240.htm

Please let me isolate XXII and XXIII for the purpose of magnifying what St. Gregory Nazianzen is truly saying.  He destroys baptism of desire and rightfully so.

XXII. But then, you say, is not God merciful, and since He knows our thoughts and searches out our desires, will He not take the desire of Baptism instead of Baptism? You are speaking in riddles, if what you mean is that because of God's mercy the unenlightened is enlightened in His sight; and he is within the kingdom of heaven who merely desires to attain to it, but refrains from doing that which pertains to the kingdom. … 

XXIII.  ...If you judge the murderously disposed man by his will aloneapart from the act of murderthen you may reckon as baptized him who desired baptism apart from the reception of baptism. But if you cannot do the one how can you do the other? I cannot see it. Or, if you like, we will put it thus:— If desire in your opinion has equal power with actual baptism, then judge in the same way in regard to glory, and you may be content with longing for it, as if that were itself glory. And what harm is done you by your not attaining the actual glory, as long as you have the desire for it? ...

Wow!  That is an explicit rejection of baptism of desire!  And St. Gregory Nazianzen said this after giving his oration on Holy lights [#39] the previous day, in which advocates of BOD and BOB, attempt to use by perverting the true meanings of what St. Gregory Nazianzen said in his oration, Holy Lights #39.  

How would it ever be possible for St. Gregory Nazianzen, in the one day, promote baptism of desire and blood and all the other types of baptism i.e. "Holy Lights" #39 [Lol] and the next day completely destroy what he said the previous day in his oration "Holy Baptism" #40!!?

This is to funny!  Lol!

In fact, St. Gregory Nazienzen, presided over the Council of Constinople in 381, just mere months after giving his orations and I don't think that it was by chance, I think that God had a hand in it!  And what came out of this Council!??

The dogmatic declaration that there is ONE BAPTISM ONLY!

The Council of Constantinople 381; Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed.

one baptism for the remission of sins.  Denzinger 86; Pg. 36

In light of the oration #40 "Holy Baptism", I think that St. Gregory Nazianzen had great influence as to the dogmatic declaration of ONE BAPTISM, not many, like BODers and BOBers falsely claim.

Other Early Fathers on the One Baptism of water and the Holy Ghost.

Letter of Barnabas 70/79 AD:  [11] In this way He says that we descend into the water full of sins and foulness, and we come up bearing fruit in our heart having fear and hope in Jesus in the spirit.” [Jurgens, The Faith of the Early Fathers, Vol. 1:34.]

Shepherd of Hermas 140/155 AD: "They had need", [the Shepherd] said,  "to come up through the water, so that they might be made alive; for they could not otherwise enter into the kingdom of God [4] [John 3:5].” [Williams Jurgens, The Faith of the Early Fathers, Vol. 1:92.]

St. Justin the Martyr First Apology 148-155: Then they are led by us to a place where there is water; and there they are reborn in the same kind of rebirth in which we ourselves were reborn: in the name of God, the Lord and Father of all, and of our Savior, Jesus grist, and of the Holy Spirit [14] [Mt. 28:19], they receive the washing with water.  For Christ said, "Unless you be reborn, you shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven [15] [John3:3]." …  The reason for doing this we have learned from the apostles.”  [Williams Jurgens, The Faith of the Early Fathers, Vol. 1:126.]

St. Aphraates the Persian Sage; Treatises, 336-345For the Spirit is absent from all those who are born of the flesh, until they come to the water of re-birth; and then they receive the Holy Spirit.  [Williams Jurgens, The Faith of the Early Fathers, Vol. 1: 683.]

And I offer this in charity, not with malice, out of true love.
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#2
Here is another noted early church father and saint who believed and promoted that water and the Holy Ghost, that both were necessary, in order to lead man to life.  

St. Irenaeus; Against the Heresies 180/199:
Just as dry wheat without moisture cannot become one dough or one loaf, so also we who are many cannot be made one in christ Jesus, without the water from heaven. Just as dry earth cannot bring forth fruit unless it receive moisture, so also we, being at first a dry tree, can never bring forth fruit unto life, without the voluntary rain from above.   Our bodies achieve unity through the washing which leads to incorruption; our souls, however, , through the spiritBoth, then, are necessary, for both lead us on to the live of God.   [William Jurgens; "The Faith of the Early Fathers, Vol. 1:220 Pg. 92]
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#3
Here is an excerpt from St. Justin the Martyr speaking to a jew named Trypho, about the one water baptism.  

St. Justin the Martyr Dialogue with Trypho the jew 155 AD:  It is necessary to hasten to learn in what way forgiveness of sins and a hope of the inheritance of the promised good things may be yours.  There is no other way than this: acknowledge Christ, be washed in the washing announced by Isaias [Isaias 58:11-Baptism] for the forgiveness of sins; and henceforth live sinlessly.  William Jurgens, The Faith of the Early Fathers, Vol. I; 135a.  

Prophecy of Isaias 58:11  And the Lord will give thee rest continually, and will fill thy soul with brightness, and deliver thy bones, and thou shalt be like a watered garden, and like a fountain of water whose waters shall not fail.
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