Is the government killing us through our food?
#11
Many of the urban poor live in food deserts, meaning there are no grocery stores for miles.  They only have liquor stores or maybe a convenience store.  So without a car, it's difficult to get fresh fruits, vegetables, meat...etc.

Some areas have started community gardens which is a wonderful idea if there is an empty plot of land.

Rooftop gardens are a fantastic way to utilize urban space and are being promoted by charity organizations.  If I had the health I would totally be involved in creating rooftop gardens in economically challenged areas.

Learning how to cook fresh food is also important, and now with Youtube it's even easier.  Most urban poor do have cell phones from what I understand.
Rome will lose the faith and become the seat of the antichrist. 
The demons of the air together with the Antichrist will perform great wonders  
The Church will be in eclipse

-Our Lady of La Salette


Like Christ, His Bride the Church will undergo its own passion, burial, and resurrection.
-unknown traditional priest

Father Ripperger said that if we are detached from all things, aren't afraid to suffer, and we accept all suffering as the will of God for our sanctity, we have nothing to fear!
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#12
(03-15-2018, 03:40 AM)Sacred Heart lover Wrote: Many of the urban poor live in food deserts, meaning there are no grocery stores for miles.  They only have liquor stores or maybe a convenience store.  So without a car, it's difficult to get fresh fruits, vegetables, meat...etc.

Some areas have started community gardens which is a wonderful idea if there is an empty plot of land.

Rooftop gardens are a fantastic way to utilize urban space and are being promoted by charity organizations.  If I had the health I would totally be involved in creating rooftop gardens in economically challenged areas.

Learning how to cook fresh food is also important, and now with Youtube it's even easier.  Most urban poor do have cell phones from what I understand.

See, I think this talking point falls apart if you think about it briefly.  First of all, this idea of "food deserts" was created as a direct response to the fact that I pointed out earlier: It is entirely possible for poor people to eat healthy despite the liberal assertion/lie to the contrary.  This is clear to anyone who grocery shops and isn't a limousine liberal who lives in a bubble.  So then food deserts comes along to continue the narrative of victimization.

There are no grocery stores around for miles literally everywhere in the United States.  It doesn't matter where you are.  Your response may be "but poor people don't have cars."  But if you live in a city there is public transportation.  Moreover, often people do have cars.  Obviously not every single poor person lacks an automobile.  And every single one of them has access to public transit.  

The concept of a food desert is also based, implicitly, on the idea that people need to grocery shop everyday.  Otherwise, why compare the availability of grocery stores to convenience stores?  But only a very stupid person would somehow be so bad at living an adult life that they couldn't reduce grocery store trips to once a week or more.  Once you accept the availability of public transit and remember that people don't grocery shop more than once a week, or even biweekly, the idea of a food desert becomes absurd on its face.  "There aren't grocery stores around for miles."  Right, so go shopping once a week taking the bus or a car if you have one to the nearest store (probably 2-5 miles away)... like anyone in any economic class would do.

And hey, lucky you, you get to live near a liquor store and you can get milk at 7-11 whenever you want!
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#13
(03-15-2018, 07:00 PM)Imperator Caesar Trump Wrote:
(03-15-2018, 03:40 AM)Sacred Heart lover Wrote: Many of the urban poor live in food deserts, meaning there are no grocery stores for miles.  They only have liquor stores or maybe a convenience store.  So without a car, it's difficult to get fresh fruits, vegetables, meat...etc.

Some areas have started community gardens which is a wonderful idea if there is an empty plot of land.

Rooftop gardens are a fantastic way to utilize urban space and are being promoted by charity organizations.  If I had the health I would totally be involved in creating rooftop gardens in economically challenged areas.

Learning how to cook fresh food is also important, and now with Youtube it's even easier.  Most urban poor do have cell phones from what I understand.

See, I think this talking point falls apart if you think about it briefly.  First of all, this idea of "food deserts" was created as a direct response to the fact that I pointed out earlier: It is entirely possible for poor people to eat healthy despite the liberal assertion/lie to the contrary.  This is clear to anyone who grocery shops and isn't a limousine liberal who lives in a bubble.  So then food deserts comes along to continue the narrative of victimization.

There are no grocery stores around for miles literally everywhere in the United States.  It doesn't matter where you are.  Your response may be "but poor people don't have cars."  But if you live in a city there is public transportation.  Moreover, often people do have cars.  Obviously not every single poor person lacks an automobile.  And every single one of them has access to public transit.  

The concept of a food desert is also based, implicitly, on the idea that people need to grocery shop everyday.  Otherwise, why compare the availability of grocery stores to convenience stores?  But only a very stupid person would somehow be so bad at living an adult life that they couldn't reduce grocery store trips to once a week or more.  Once you accept the availability of public transit and remember that people don't grocery shop more than once a week, or even biweekly, the idea of a food desert becomes absurd on its face.  "There aren't grocery stores around for miles."  Right, so go shopping once a week taking the bus or a car if you have one to the nearest store (probably 2-5 miles away)... like anyone in any economic class would do.

And hey, lucky you, you get to live near a liquor store and you can get milk at 7-11 whenever you want!

This is long and I can't proofread real well, so I hope it's coherent. Sticking tongue out at you

I hear ya'.

I'm not for victimization or government programs.

But you have to take a walk in their shoes for a bit to get an idea of the obstacles they have to overcome.



So I'm an 18-year-old mother of 2.  I'm a third generation welfare recipient. My Mom is a prostitute. So are many of my friends.  My Dad and my brothers molested me. CPS threatened to take me away from my mom but I didn't want to go.  My Dad and oldest brother are in prison now for dealing drugs. The next oldest was shot and killed.  So was my cousin.  I turned to drugs at 15.  Went to juvie at 17.   My boyfriend who has kids with 8 other women only visits for sex just beat me up.  (I've had African American caregivers with stories like this!)

So now I have this screaming baby who poops or screams anytime I try to take him somewhere and the people in the store stare at me disapprovingly.  How will I get the groceries home with a baby who's poopy on the train?  How will I make dinner with a baby who needs to nurse all the time?  What will I do when I have two toddlers and a baby?  

I am walking through life in a daze.  I have to figure out the math for my welfare and food stamps for the month but I'm not able to do it because I never learned how.  The bus and train cost money and I've never learned how to cook anything except a can of beans and PB&J. I've never really eaten any kind of sit down dinner with vegetables and all or had a regular bedtime. We always just ate when we were hungry in front of the tv and stayed up late. 

All I care about is surviving today, that the baby will stop crying, trying to stay sober and going to bed.

Let's hit Burger King and call it a night.



I was college educated and had a hard time learning how to plan, shop for and cook meals when I got married. Finding recipes, writing down the ingredients, finding all the ingredients I had never heard of before, figuring out what the cooking terms in the book meant, how long would the vegetables last how much would we need, how long would leftovers last, how do you heat the leftovers?  

It's so much easier now with the internet and Youtube.  But it's the kind of thing that's no problem if you've grown up helping in the kitchen or watching Mom (or maybe Dad) do it.  My friends and I were involved in sports and cheer and things after school so we did dishes but never learned how to cook. (I made sure to teach my boys and girls.)  Nevertheless, I was determined to be the best homemaker I could be and had high standards for myself and my home because that was instilled in me from my upbringing.  Then learning how to care for babies and all!  

As for the girl in my story, there is only so much trauma a person can deal with.  I've been through great trauma and could barely function.  When you grow up with it and it's continual and severe it becomes PTSD and depression and anxiety.  It really can cause ADD, I believe, but I'm not sure that drugs are always the best answer, especially long term. Learning something new is hard, but learning under stress causes a serious reduction of focus and confidence.   And let's say she starts to put effort into grocery shopping and trying to make a few things.  There's another trauma right around the corner.  Boyfriend OD's.  Apartment get's robbed. etc, etc.  It's hard to get momentum and a rhythm to your life when it's blow after blow.

There is something to white privilege I believe.  Certainly not always (as is the case in Hillbilly Elegy) but more often than not you have some relative family stability, comparatively high standards for social norms, high expectations from those around you, the habit of living a healthy lifestyle, a cultivated palate, mealtime rituals, connections for college recommendation letters and mentoring...etc.  There is a lot to be grateful for (not guilty for). We all stand on the shoulders of giants.  Family culture that provides and encourages the habits for learning and a relatively safe place to live are essential.   

You read (or listen to) the biography of someone like Dr. Ben Carson or J.D. Vance, author of Hillbilly Elegy, and you know people can make it out of there, but it's rare for a reason.  Usually, you need at least one stable person in your life to help mentor you or you just won't have any idea what to do.

We also have evil people who are doing everything possible to destroy black culture, including Margaret Sanger, the Bushes who imported drugs through Mena, AR to sell to inner city gangs, the Jewish Hollywood propaganda machine and the CIA infiltrated Black Panthers and Roc "afeller" backing rap artists who promise to push his agenda. How many racial cultures could stand up to that kind of organized demise?  We are all feeling it too but we had a stronger foundation to begin with.

One of my "mother's helpers" was a sweet teen girl who came from Mexico with her parents.  Her mom had cancer and her dad abandoned the family and went back to Mexico.  They were Catholic but the Mormons came over and mowed their lawn, and went grocery shopping for them. They drove the family to their meetings for parents and kids. Guess what?  They are Mormon now.

So I believe in charity rather than government intervention and I don't believe that IQ can explain everything even though plays a large part.  I think the movie Stand and Deliver was an excellent example of this.  

So, I think the garden idea is great because it involves a positive community building experience.  Gardening is very therapeutic and kids and adults can be involved. You are outdoors in the fresh air and not in front of the tv. It's hard work which makes you feel proud and it's great exercise!
Rome will lose the faith and become the seat of the antichrist. 
The demons of the air together with the Antichrist will perform great wonders  
The Church will be in eclipse

-Our Lady of La Salette


Like Christ, His Bride the Church will undergo its own passion, burial, and resurrection.
-unknown traditional priest

Father Ripperger said that if we are detached from all things, aren't afraid to suffer, and we accept all suffering as the will of God for our sanctity, we have nothing to fear!
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#14
Believe me, I hear you and to an extent agree with you.  I'm not as heartless as I seem, I swear Smile   One of the reasons my field is psychiatric nursing is because of my sympathy with many of the situations you described.  I believe that some people can be in impossible situations.  It's not as if we live in a truly just society by any measure.  I probably don't have the optimism you do.

Well, maybe.  I worked in the inner city as a teacher for several years.  I saw exactly zero promise of the potential for change or improvement.  There was one place I did see years later though.  After I moved out of the city but was trying to figure out where to attend Mass, I went to an FSSP parish that had a number of black families.  Seeing them gave me the first inkling of optimism I think I'd had since I left.
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#15
(03-15-2018, 07:00 PM)Imperator Caesar Trump Wrote:
(03-15-2018, 03:40 AM)Sacred Heart lover Wrote: Many of the urban poor live in food deserts, meaning there are no grocery stores for miles.  They only have liquor stores or maybe a convenience store.  So without a car, it's difficult to get fresh fruits, vegetables, meat...etc.

Some areas have started community gardens which is a wonderful idea if there is an empty plot of land.

Rooftop gardens are a fantastic way to utilize urban space and are being promoted by charity organizations.  If I had the health I would totally be involved in creating rooftop gardens in economically challenged areas.

Learning how to cook fresh food is also important, and now with Youtube it's even easier.  Most urban poor do have cell phones from what I understand.

See, I think this talking point falls apart if you think about it briefly.  First of all, this idea of "food deserts" was created as a direct response to the fact that I pointed out earlier: It is entirely possible for poor people to eat healthy despite the liberal assertion/lie to the contrary.  This is clear to anyone who grocery shops and isn't a limousine liberal who lives in a bubble.  So then food deserts comes along to continue the narrative of victimization.

There are no grocery stores around for miles literally everywhere in the United States.  It doesn't matter where you are.  Your response may be "but poor people don't have cars."  But if you live in a city there is public transportation.  Moreover, often people do have cars.  Obviously not every single poor person lacks an automobile.  And every single one of them has access to public transit.  

The concept of a food desert is also based, implicitly, on the idea that people need to grocery shop everyday.  Otherwise, why compare the availability of grocery stores to convenience stores?  But only a very stupid person would somehow be so bad at living an adult life that they couldn't reduce grocery store trips to once a week or more.  Once you accept the availability of public transit and remember that people don't grocery shop more than once a week, or even biweekly, the idea of a food desert becomes absurd on its face.  "There aren't grocery stores around for miles."  Right, so go shopping once a week taking the bus or a car if you have one to the nearest store (probably 2-5 miles away)... like anyone in any economic class would do.

I'm curious if you've ever lived in a large city with no car. I have. Not in the US but Edmonton, Alberta, population about a million. Excellent public transportation. A bus stop across the street from my house. Bus every half hour straight to the mall with the Safeway. I shopped virtually every day. Why? Because doing a week's shopping and trying to take the bus had a few problems. It made you very unpopular with the driver because the time it took to load and unload a week's worth of shopping made him go off his schedule. It made you extremely unpopular with the other riders because you were either taking up seats with your groceries or they were tripping over them in the aisles. It made you unpopular with any other riders who were on a schedule, like trying to get to work or a doctor's appointment and who were going to be late because you were delaying the bus. And, in the winter, I'm sure it made you extremely unpopular with people who were waiting in an unheated bus shelter for a bus that was running late because you had to load and unload a week's worth of shopping.

If I went every day, I could carry my purchases in my backpack, put it on my lap on the bus, not delay the bus and not take up extra room. Had there been a convenience store closer than the mall, I would have been buying junk food there, in part just to save the bus fare.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


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#16
(03-15-2018, 11:34 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(03-15-2018, 07:00 PM)Imperator Caesar Trump Wrote:
(03-15-2018, 03:40 AM)Sacred Heart lover Wrote: Many of the urban poor live in food deserts, meaning there are no grocery stores for miles.  They only have liquor stores or maybe a convenience store.  So without a car, it's difficult to get fresh fruits, vegetables, meat...etc.

Some areas have started community gardens which is a wonderful idea if there is an empty plot of land.

Rooftop gardens are a fantastic way to utilize urban space and are being promoted by charity organizations.  If I had the health I would totally be involved in creating rooftop gardens in economically challenged areas.

Learning how to cook fresh food is also important, and now with Youtube it's even easier.  Most urban poor do have cell phones from what I understand.

See, I think this talking point falls apart if you think about it briefly.  First of all, this idea of "food deserts" was created as a direct response to the fact that I pointed out earlier: It is entirely possible for poor people to eat healthy despite the liberal assertion/lie to the contrary.  This is clear to anyone who grocery shops and isn't a limousine liberal who lives in a bubble.  So then food deserts comes along to continue the narrative of victimization.

There are no grocery stores around for miles literally everywhere in the United States.  It doesn't matter where you are.  Your response may be "but poor people don't have cars."  But if you live in a city there is public transportation.  Moreover, often people do have cars.  Obviously not every single poor person lacks an automobile.  And every single one of them has access to public transit.  

The concept of a food desert is also based, implicitly, on the idea that people need to grocery shop everyday.  Otherwise, why compare the availability of grocery stores to convenience stores?  But only a very stupid person would somehow be so bad at living an adult life that they couldn't reduce grocery store trips to once a week or more.  Once you accept the availability of public transit and remember that people don't grocery shop more than once a week, or even biweekly, the idea of a food desert becomes absurd on its face.  "There aren't grocery stores around for miles."  Right, so go shopping once a week taking the bus or a car if you have one to the nearest store (probably 2-5 miles away)... like anyone in any economic class would do.

I'm curious if you've ever lived in a large city with no car. I have. Not in the US but Edmonton, Alberta, population about a million. Excellent public transportation. A bus stop across the street from my house. Bus every half hour straight to the mall with the Safeway. I shopped virtually every day. Why? Because doing a week's shopping and trying to take the bus had a few problems. It made you very unpopular with the driver because the time it took to load and unload a week's worth of shopping made him go off his schedule. It made you extremely unpopular with the other riders because you were either taking up seats with your groceries or they were tripping over them in the aisles. It made you unpopular with any other riders who were on a schedule, like trying to get to work or a doctor's appointment and who were going to be late because you were delaying the bus. And, in the winter, I'm sure it made you extremely unpopular with people who were waiting in an unheated bus shelter for a bus that was running late because you had to load and unload a week's worth of shopping.

If I went every day, I could carry my purchases in my backpack, put it on my lap on the bus, not delay the bus and not take up extra room. Had there been a convenience store closer than the mall, I would have been buying junk food there, in part just to save the bus fare.

Yes, and I can't even imagine with a baby and toddlers and morning (all day) sick! helpsmiley

Vegetables just aren't a very good incentive. 

Especially when you grew up never eating them. Sticking tongue out at you
Rome will lose the faith and become the seat of the antichrist. 
The demons of the air together with the Antichrist will perform great wonders  
The Church will be in eclipse

-Our Lady of La Salette


Like Christ, His Bride the Church will undergo its own passion, burial, and resurrection.
-unknown traditional priest

Father Ripperger said that if we are detached from all things, aren't afraid to suffer, and we accept all suffering as the will of God for our sanctity, we have nothing to fear!
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#17
(03-15-2018, 11:41 PM)Sacred Heart lover Wrote: Yes, and I can't even imagine with a baby and toddlers and morning (all day) sick! helpsmiley

Well, obviously, I never had that problem, but the bus route to the mall went by the teenage mothers' high school, and if it was just before or after school, I was lucky to find a place to sit with my backpack on my lap! LOL
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


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#18
I strongly believe our diet is affecting our health, and we have been given misinformation about how to be healthy.  

Undoctored by Dr. William Davis was a huge eye-opener for me.  I have been suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, and diagnosed with asthma at age 30.  I never had asthma or asthma attacks my entire life until I was 30 years old--that is very strange.  Then several years later I started experiencing extreme pain and swelling in my joints, so painful that I couldn't even bear to hold a pencil or fork in my hand.  Every test came back negative, but I have been taking taking medications for rheumatoid arthritis as they have helped and I can at least function with them.

Dr. Davis discusses the healthcare industry and how he believes it is set-up for profits and not to promote health.  I'm an RN, and this has really opened my eyes. I've been grain-free for several months now, and am now off of daily asthma meds--I still keep a rescue inhaler just in case.  I hope to eventually get off of the immuno-suppressant drugs as well.  

Initially going grain-free, I thought there was barely anything to eat, its amazing the different foods and meals you can have, you just need to retrain your brain on what makes a meal.  A handful of almonds and some cheese makes a quick and filling breakfast or light lunch.  I often pack some tuna fish and a small avocado for lunch.  Once I stopped eating grains and sugar, I realized how little good food I actually need to stay full.  
I can't tolerate any wheat or oats anymore.  If I do "cheat" I eat rice which does not seem to bother me, but that's only on occasion--usually if we go out for sushi and that's rare.  Its amazing to experience how sweet natural fruits and vegetables are.  Roasted brussel spouts taste like candy to me now--I'm serious!  Big Grin they are so good!  lol  

I also accept the author's idea that many of our current chronic illnesses are do to too much food.  Since we were kids, we've been told we need so many servings of bread, etc etc per day.  While through most of  history, humans have never had access to so much food 24-7.  I think this has caused an increase in (obviously) type 2 diabetes, but also auto-immune and inflammatory diseases.  Humans fare better on less food, as long as its nutrient rich food, and periodic or intermittent fasting has been shown to have positive health benefits.



  

[url=https://dontwastethecrumbs.com/2015/03/14-facts-the-organic-industry-doesnt-want-you-to-know/][/url]
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#19
Today, most of the items sold in the stores are no long safe for human consumption, as about 80% of the average human diet is extremely unhealthy. We no longer engage in clean eating habits because most of our most cherished foods are entirely loaded with things that can damage our health.
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