A bit early in the year to discuss this, but....
#31
Getting my Richard Nixon mask ready to get me and the kids some free candy! Yummy!
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#32
More strange news from my research:
Quote: Wal-Mart goes Wicca By Judi McLeod
Tuesday, October 18, 2005

The five and dime department store of the past is where your mother treated you to balloons and lollipops. Now you can buy books at the five and dime that teach you how to cast a spell on mother.

Wal-Mart, the company that put Dead Peasant Life Insurance on the map, is going Wicca.

Dead Peasant Life Insurance is the loathsome practice of taking life insurance on people without their knowledge and callously cashing in on the policy at the time of their death. Wal-Mart was defendant in five putative class-action lawsuits because of its Dead Peasant Life Insurance policies on unwitting employees. Three of the lawsuits were pending in Texas as recently as last April.

It’s not as much fun for Mom to take her brood to the department store anymore. Along with the Barbie dolls and Tonka Toys, 100 items for Wicca can be found at Wal-Mart.

The Everything Wicca and Witchcraft Book: Unlock the Secrets of Ancient Rituals, Spells, Blessings and Sacred Objects has been slashed from $14.95 to $9.84.

"Always low prices Always is the Wal-Mart mantra.

The Witch Book: The Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, Wicca and Neo-Paganism can be had for $49.50.

There’s Wicca for Beginners and The Witch Next Door: Separating Fact from Fiction about Witchcraft, Wicca, Goddess Worship and Neo-Paganism.

(And you thought your next-door neighbour was only a tad eccentric.)

There are people who have had encounters with wiccans, wizards, covens, cults and the magic, and their experiences are captured in a book of the same title.

If you’re not getting what you’re looking for out of Bible classes at the church you attend, there’s The Wicca Bible: The Definitive Guide to Magic and the Craft.

The Wal-Mart of all things Wicca only includes one anti-Wicca book, Protecting Your Teen from Today’s Witchcraft: A Parent’s Guide to Confronting Wicca and the Occult.

If you’re a newcomer to the world of Wicca, there’s the inevitable Wicca & Witchcraft for Dummies.

Wal-Mart’s competitor in the United States, Target, is starting its own RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification) testing in Texas and has barred Salvation Army bell ringers at Christmas time.

Oh, for the days when the closest thing to witches that could be found down at the local department store was the witch’s costume you bought for Halloween. 

excerpted from: http://www.canadafreepress.com/

 

We don't do Halloween at our house at all. It's wa-a-y too close to paying homage to the devil (and the Society priests don't like it). I'm no fun when it comes to this. We don't need it. There is a new phraseology being used by the department stores: Halloween Season. Yuck!

 

In JMJ

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#33
I haven't trick or treated in a long time. This year I'm going to dress up like a crusader (as some of you may know). I want to go for a nice evening stroll with a friend or two, and maybe yell at kids dressed up like goblins. I am tempted to give people a "trick" by singing Christmas songs and stuff. No one will expect it [Image: laff.gif]
If I ever get married and have kids? I dunno. Maybe I'll let them go. They'll have to dress up like saints or something. I have a question though...is it okay to dress up like a priest, bishop, cardinal, pope, etc? Not a saint, but just a normal clergyman.
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#34
Marybonita Wrote:

 

We don't do Halloween at our house at all. It's wa-a-y too close to paying homage to the devil (and the Society priests don't like it). I'm no fun when it comes to this. We don't need it. There is a new phraseology being used by the department stores: Halloween Season. Yuck!

 

In JMJ


I'm with you Marybonita on this, though it seems we are the minority that think that way here. Smile
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#35
PaxTecum Wrote:
Marybonita Wrote:

We don't do Halloween at our house at all. It's wa-a-y too close to paying homage to the devil (and the Society priests don't like it). I'm no fun when it comes to this. We don't need it. There is a new phraseology being used by the department stores: Halloween Season. Yuck!

In JMJ


I'm with you Marybonita on this, though it seems we are the minority that think that way here. Smile

I'm leaning that way...
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#36
You are absolutely right MaryBonita that the SSPX Priests do not like it. At least our Priests don't.  Father Tague, Father Katzaroff and Father Pfieffer all have told us that celebrating Halloween is participating in a evil pagan thing, and don't do it.  We just left the NO last year and my 4yo has trick or treated and is bugging about it .  I believe that we will also be one of the minority and say no. We will celebrate as Traditionally as we can.  ( I need to find out how).  Ideas anyone?? 

In Christ
Monique

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#37
PaxTecum Wrote:I'm with you Marybonita on this, though it seems we are the minority that think that way here. Smile

Hey yall, if you don't want to be in the minority anymore you should jump over to Angelqueen [Image: tongue.gif]  You'd def. be in the majority on Halloween . . . I almost got crucified over there when I said Halloween is Catholic [Image: eek.gif]
 
I did notice that this board is a whole lot more civil than Angelqueen.  Some men over there last night called the women in the WNBA "horses".  Oh my goodness.
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#38
Quote:I did notice that this board is a whole lot more civil than Angelqueen.
 
Yes, Vox, beats us quite badly if we misbehave. And then there's those moderators.[Image: pipe.gif][Image: pipe.gif][Image: pipe.gif]
 
I have posted there a few times but it's too contentious for me although I read it quite a bit. (I recognize your handle). Personal attacks are ugly even if you are in the right. lol
 
I use my spleen on NO websites. Aye - oremus! And come here for downtime. It's such a blessing.
 
In JMJ
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#39
I do not support the idea of women playing sports such as basketball, when immodest clothing is worn. The basketball uniforms are quite immodest. There is a very good article on this subject on TiA.
 
However, calling them "horses" is absolutely not the way to correct the problem. It's unnecessarily rude and offensive, and frankly I have no idea how it is derived from the concept of a woman playing professional basketball...
 
I am still completely indifferent on the issue of Halloween, because both sides have made very good points. I can see where one would say that it's a celebration of evil and the occult, but I can also remember when I was young and how much pure, innocent fun I and my friends had going "trick-or-treating" on Halloween night.
 
 
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