Dining out on Sunday after Church -- did I do the right thing?
#11
I think that sometimes in these circumstances an exception is in order. When you dined out you  gave your wife teh morning off from having to cook breakfast. You gave some employment to some people who probably need it.
I think that there are some services which are performed which, while not absolutely necessary (911 operators - fire men etc...) There are some services which help the general population observe the Sunday repose and facilitate the observance of Sunday mass attendance. For example when you leave your house and you notice that the tank is almost empty, would you refuse to stop at your local gas station because the act of buying gas would be too commercial?
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#12
Quote:Poche
For example when you leave your house and you notice that the tank is almost empty, would you refuse to stop at your local gas station because the act of buying gas would be too commercial?

I'm pretty sure that's not a problem in that scenario, however, the goal is to start thinking ahead and try to prepare for Sunday as much as possible so no work is necessary on the Lord's Day.

Exceptions will happen though.
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#13
(04-10-2018, 02:01 AM)Galahad3 Wrote: I thought I was possibly being scrupulous, so before I posted this thread I consulted the "Keeping the Lord's Day" page on the main Fisheater's Site (under "Being Catholic"), and it said that eating out qualifies as making others do servile work. I'm a fairly new Catholic so I am unfamilar with many of the "unwritten rules," but doing anything to make a profit (or encouraging others to do so) on the Lord's Day seems a bit "off" to me. I understand the need for fundamentally charitable services (police, hospitals, etc.) to remain available on Sundays, of course, but I'm having trouble seeing how diners and whatnot fit that bill. 

Of course I also understand charity from the consumer's perspective -- supporting local businesses and being involved in the community -- but I don't see where the line is (or should be) drawn. Can you go buy a video game from a local electronics store that stays open on Sundays? Rent a DVD to watch with your family from the local video store? Get your oil changed and tires rotated by the local mechanic? Shop for groceries for Sunday dinner at Wal-Mart, staffed by local people just trying to make a paycheck?

At any rate I appreciate the feedback and I'll try to be less rigid from now on I suppose.

In my opinion that part of the site is overly-strict in that regard, though you've done well to try to take advice on the subject.

The question on diners and restaurants stems from the fact that often in the past these were associated with an inn, and that is a necessary service. An inn-keeper would not only play host to guests, but need to feed them, and since these were public places, others would take advantage of them. From that long-standing custom came the custom of allowing restaurants to stay open on Sundays.

Legitimate customs modify the law, so that certain things are permitted. 

Such customs even allow, for instance, a Sunday Farmers' Market in some Catholic countries. The farmers would come in for Sunday Mass, bring their produce and after Mass sell it. It was highly convenient, because it was the one day that the farmer could come to town and take off the farm chores, it brought them the income needed, allowed them to give a portion to the Church, and avoided the middle-man traders who were usurers. The Church has always historically allowed and modified her practice to allow certain activities in certain places.

The general English-speaking world custom is that only the necessary services are open on Sundays, plus restaurants, parks, sporting events. Other shops which are not necessary were never allowed before modern times.

I have a good friend in New Zealand (a very secular country) who was shocked to find in his first Easter there that Good Friday is a public holiday, keeping the old English-speaking Catholic tradition : No business may be open except gas stations, convenience stores and restaurants/take out shops. No unprepared food is allowed to be sold, and even those convenience stores are not supposed to sell any more unprepared food than is necessary for a single day (though, good luck enforcing that).

There are very strict limits, and you shouldn't allow yourself undue laxity, but things like restaurants are fine. If you don't like the idea, then you are welcome to not frequent such places except occasionally, but it is a normal and typical thing for many Catholics to have a brunch at a restaurant after Mass on Sunday, and such is perfectly fine.

I myself often went with my parish priest (at an exclusively traddie parish) for lunch on Sundays at his favorite restaurant. Were it strictly forbidden, or even a matter that might cause scandal, then certainly a priest would be avoiding it.
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#14
(04-10-2018, 02:44 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: I understand your motivation, but as has been pointed out what you did is not a sin. I agree that in an ideal world, shops, restaurants, etc. would be closed in honour of the Lord's Day. In our modern world, that ain't gonna happen, unfortunately. 'Blue laws' have consistently been struck down by the courts, tho' some jurisdictions have passed laws mandating closing one day a week. Obviously, this is usually Sunday, tho' some restaurants choose to close on another day, often Monday, which tends to the slowest day of the week for them.

As a aside, many years ago, before I became a Catholic, I worked in a Kinney's shoe store on the Kansas side of the Kansas City metro. Everyone wanted to transfer to the Missouri side, because Missouri had a blue law that prohibited the sale of most non-essential item on Sunday. Restaurants were excepted however, since that tends to be one of their best sales days.
Kinney's Shoe Store, that's a blast from the past. Haven't heard the name of that shoe store in years.
Bob

If my dog doesn't like you maybe I shouldn't either!!

“No one in the world can change Truth!”
St. Maximilian Kolbe, PRAY FOR US!
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#15
The "Lord's Day" page has been updated to prevent confusion. I hope!
T h e   D u d e t t e   A b i d e s
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#16
(04-10-2018, 04:04 AM)Sacred Heart lover Wrote:
Quote:Poche
For example when you leave your house and you notice that the tank is almost empty, would you refuse to stop at your local gas station because the act of buying gas would be too commercial?

I'm pretty sure that's not a problem in that scenario, however, the goal is to start thinking ahead and try to prepare for Sunday as much as possible so no work is necessary on the Lord's Day.

Exceptions will happen though.

Remember that Jesus rebuked the Pharisees when they went after his disciples for shucking the grains of wheat during the Sabbath.
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#17
(04-10-2018, 01:32 PM)VoxClamantis Wrote: The "Lord's Day" page has been updated to prevent confusion. I hope!

Thanks, Vox.

Ultimately, I think it would be good if we returned eventually to everything except true necessities being off-limits for Sundays and Holy Days, but that's an ideal to be pursued when we're back in a Christian Society rather than the present Post-Christian dis-society, lest we burden people beyond reason.

For now, Mmmm, bacon.
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#18
I just wanted to add that while we don't want to be overstrict on this, as has been discussed, I have to say that little things like this can make a huge impression on others.

Children especially will take note and remember how important the Lord's Day was to dad.  Nieces and nephews and grandchildren as well. :)

So while our little sacrifices won't make a dent in changing the blue laws for now, they can speak volumes for evangelizing others in our life.  

It can also make our heart more attentive to our priorities in life.
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#19
(04-11-2018, 02:31 AM)Poche Wrote:
(04-10-2018, 04:04 AM)Sacred Heart lover Wrote:
Quote:Poche
For example when you leave your house and you notice that the tank is almost empty, would you refuse to stop at your local gas station because the act of buying gas would be too commercial?

I'm pretty sure that's not a problem in that scenario, however, the goal is to start thinking ahead and try to prepare for Sunday as much as possible so no work is necessary on the Lord's Day.

Exceptions will happen though.

Remember that Jesus rebuked the Pharisees when they went after his disciples for shucking the grains of wheat during the Sabbath.

I don't think I'm being Pharisaical here.

From Fisheater's on the Lord's Day:


Quote:Sundays should be stress-free, relaxing, and conducive to thanksgiving, to looking at God's trulycompleted work with a "Deo gratias" in our hearts while strengthened, by the Sacrament we receive at Mass, to pick up our own cross.

To keep Sundays holy, we should prepare for them -- taking the trash out on Saturday instead of Sunday, throwing together meals 2 on Saturday that can be warmed-up or baked off on Sunday, ensuring that children have their homework and chores out of the way, having the house clean, etc. We prepare spiritually, too: Saturday is the customary day for going to Confession, a "weekly cleaning" that readies one for the Sunday reception of the Eucharist. 
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#20
My Dad owned a chain of retail stores and refused to stay open on Sundays all the way through the 90's.

It made an impression on his employees.

He also would tell me that he was going to get the gas tank filled on Saturday so as to be all set for the Lord's Day.  

So like I said, little things like that can make a big impression.
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