Gaudete et exsultate
#1
Quote:26. It is not healthy to love silence while fleeing interaction with others, to want peace and quiet while avoiding activity, to seek prayer while disdaining service. Everything can be accepted and integrated into our life in this world, and become a part of our path to holiness. We are called to be contemplatives even in the midst of action, and to grow in holiness by responsibly and generously carrying out our proper mission.

Doesn't this basically claim Jesus was wrong to go into the desert for 40 days?
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#2
I have read elsewhere that the document is anti-contemplative and anti-ascetic. I do not have the ability to read the document for myself - the length and the Jesuitical word-puke will put me to sleep.
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#3
(04-09-2018, 11:04 PM)For Petes Sake Wrote:
Quote:26. It is not healthy to love silence while fleeing interaction with others, to want peace and quiet while avoiding activity, to seek prayer while disdaining service. Everything can be accepted and integrated into our life in this world, and become a part of our path to holiness. We are called to be contemplatives even in the midst of action, and to grow in holiness by responsibly and generously carrying out our proper mission.

Doesn't this basically claim Jesus was wrong to go into the desert for 40 days?

Yep, and it also makes Our Lord a liar when he said to Martha, 'Mary hath chosen the best part, which shall not be taken away from her.' And it makes we wonder if his next target is the contemplative Orders, after he and his minions are done destroying the FFI and the Canons Regular of St John Cantius.
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#4
Quote:173. Naturally, this attitude of listening entails obedience to the Gospel as the ultimate standard, but also to the Magisterium that guards it, as we seek to find in the treasury of the Church whatever is most fruitful for the “today” of salvation. It is not a matter of applying rules or repeating what was done in the past, since the same solutions are not valid in all circumstances and what was useful in one context may not prove so in another. The discernment of spirits liberates us from rigidity, which has no place before the perennial “today” of the risen Lord. The Spirit alone can penetrate what is obscure and hidden in every situation, and grasp its every nuance, so that the newness of the Gospel can emerge in another light."
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#5
(04-09-2018, 11:04 PM)For Petes Sake Wrote:
Quote:26. It is not healthy to love silence while fleeing interaction with others, to want peace and quiet while avoiding activity, to seek prayer while disdaining service. Everything can be accepted and integrated into our life in this world, and become a part of our path to holiness. We are called to be contemplatives even in the midst of action, and to grow in holiness by responsibly and generously carrying out our proper mission.

Doesn't this basically claim Jesus was wrong to go into the desert for 40 days?
Peace.....I would agree only in that if one is deliberately "avoiding" life, others and situations - no it becomes a means of escape.  Having a regular prayer life of quiet, retreat and solitude and intention with the right balance is healthy.  Not everyone has the same nature and there are those who require more quiet time and contemplate more deeply in that quiet.  "Be still and know that I am God" & "Mary chose the better part."
God bless, angeltime :heart:
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#6
(04-09-2018, 11:04 PM)For Petes Sake Wrote:
Quote:26. It is not healthy to love silence while fleeing interaction with others, to want peace and quiet while avoiding activity, to seek prayer while disdaining service. Everything can be accepted and integrated into our life in this world, and become a part of our path to holiness. We are called to be contemplatives even in the midst of action, and to grow in holiness by responsibly and generously carrying out our proper mission.

Doesn't this basically claim Jesus was wrong to go into the desert for 40 days?

I guess it could say that to go into the desert for 40 days is Our Lord just going into solitude for a time and then coming back into the world vs. a permanent abandoning of the world.

In a way it's an attack on the idea of completely detaching from every single earthly thing and escape into solitude and contemplation as a primary way of life. I do feel like some writings I've seen from saints consider this the highest and most perfect form of serving God rather than being in the world.
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#7
(04-10-2018, 09:08 AM)GangGreen Wrote:
(04-09-2018, 11:04 PM)For Petes Sake Wrote:
Quote:26. It is not healthy to love silence while fleeing interaction with others, to want peace and quiet while avoiding activity, to seek prayer while disdaining service. Everything can be accepted and integrated into our life in this world, and become a part of our path to holiness. We are called to be contemplatives even in the midst of action, and to grow in holiness by responsibly and generously carrying out our proper mission.

Doesn't this basically claim Jesus was wrong to go into the desert for 40 days?

I guess it could say that to go into the desert for 40 days is Our Lord just going into solitude for a time and then coming back into the world vs. a permanent abandoning of the world.
Peace.....well, Jesus always returned to the people and Nazareth for example.  He had the desert experience when he wanted more prayer and to be closer to His Father - so one has to do that at times to eliminate distraction and contemplate.  Jesus did say, "How long must I be with this perverse generation?"  He also said to the apostles, "Can't you spend one hour with me?"  A good question for us today when so many don't seem to want to attend Mass, Adoration or even have a prayer life.  (Can't they spend one hour with Him?)  Abandoning the world in the sense of - abandoning the WAYS of the world.  We are in it but not of it.  God bless, angeltime :heart:
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#8
(04-10-2018, 09:00 AM)angeltime Wrote: Peace.....I would agree only in that if one is deliberately "avoiding" life, others and situations - no it becomes a means of escape.

So it's wrong to become a cloistered nun who stays in her convent and prays? They serve the world through prayer, not by going outside their walls and "doing things".

I suppose now we know what the Pope thinks of one path to holiness that created a lot of saints.
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#9
(04-12-2018, 02:27 AM)Paul Wrote: So it's wrong to become a cloistered nun who stays in her convent and prays? They serve the world through prayer, not by going outside their walls and "doing things".

It would appear that way. I did notice his statement about "carrying out our proper mission," but now I'm wondering if he considers being cloistered a "mission" anymore.

More confusion from this pontificate...
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#10
sounds like something a Jesuit would say/write.
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