Who's reading what?
#11
(04-12-2018, 07:00 AM)CaptCrunch73 Wrote:
(04-12-2018, 06:58 AM)Jeeter Wrote: Related to Catholicism, I'm currently reading The Interior Castle, by St. Teresa of Avila.  Not related to Catholicism is The River of the Mother of God, by Aldo Leopold.

(04-11-2018, 09:25 PM)Margaret-Mary Wrote: Imitation of The Sacred Heart of Jesus, by Rev. Peter J. Arnoudt, SJ. Impossible to recommend it enough.

Thanks for the recommendation.  I'll put this one on my reading list.  :)

This is on my list as well, have read reviews and it is on par with Imitation of Christ

Ohhhh, I just found it on YouTube! 

It's the automated voice, but still. :)

Thanks for recommending!
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#12
Confessions by St. Augustine (2nd edition translated by F.J. Sheed)

The Brothers Karamazov by Dostoyevsky (translated by Constance Garnett available for free at eBooks@Adelaide: Free Web Books, Online)

Paradoxes of Catholicism by Robert Hugh Benson

On Sundays and feast days, I read the sermons of Father Francis Xavier Weninger. Here are some links to where you can download these books for free (they were published before 1900):

Original, short and practical sermons for every feast of the Ecclesiastical year – 3 sermons for every feast) by Rev. F.X. Weninger, S.J., Doctor of Theology, 2nd edition 1882

Original, short and practical sermons for every Sunday of the Ecclesiastical year – 3 sermons for every Sunday) by Rev. F.X. Weninger, S.J., Doctor of Theology, 2nd edition 1881
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#13
(04-12-2018, 07:15 AM)Sacred Heart lover Wrote: Ohhhh, I just found it on YouTube! 

It's the automated voice, but still. :)

Thanks for recommending!

You found Leopold on YouTube? :P
-sent by howitzer via the breech.

God's love is manifest in the landscape as in a face.  - John Muir

I want creation to penetrate you with so much admiration that wherever you go, the least plant may bring you clear remembrance of the Creator.  A single plant, a blade of grass, or one speck of dust is sufficient to occupy all your intelligence in beholding the art with which it has been made  - Saint Basil

Heaven is under our feet, as well as over our heads. - Thoreau, Walden
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#14
(04-12-2018, 08:22 AM)Jeeter Wrote:
(04-12-2018, 07:15 AM)Sacred Heart lover Wrote: Ohhhh, I just found it on YouTube! 

It's the automated voice, but still. :)

Thanks for recommending!

You found Leopold on YouTube?  :P

Oh, I see.  No, it's The Imitation of the Sacred Heart.  It's hard to listen to that robot voice and meditate on Jesus though. :/

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#15
Just finished up A Devotional Journey into the Mass by Christopher Carstens.

Will either start on Ross Douthat's new book on Pope Francis: "The Change the Church: Pope Francis and the Future of Catholicism" or Stanisalus Campbell's "From Breviary to Liturgy of the Hours: The Structural Reform of the Roman Office"
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#16
(04-12-2018, 08:27 AM)Sacred Heart lover Wrote:
(04-12-2018, 08:22 AM)Jeeter Wrote:
(04-12-2018, 07:15 AM)Sacred Heart lover Wrote: Ohhhh, I just found it on YouTube! 

It's the automated voice, but still. :)

Thanks for recommending!

You found Leopold on YouTube?  :P

Oh, I see.  No, it's The Imitation of the Sacred Heart.  It's hard to listen to that robot voice and meditate on Jesus though. :/


LOL, I know re: the voices! I first found this about a year-and-a-half ago, I think -- and I was sooooooo moved by it, I listened to it daily, and the robot people's voices grew on me, haha! I listened for at least a year before buying the book, and it's SO MEATY that I read it daily, just one chapter a day, and when I'm done, will start over from the beginning, probably forever. It is like the Imitation of Christ, but somehow MORE. I love them both, but when I was feeling drawn to learn more about the Sacred Heart Devotion, this recording (and then book) hit me like a bolt of holy lightening and deeply moved me forward.... (hard to put that into words...)
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#17
(04-12-2018, 07:19 AM)Julia Augusta Wrote: Confessions by St. Augustine (2nd edition translated by F.J. Sheed)

The Brothers Karamazov by Dostoyevsky (translated by Constance Garnett available for free at eBooks@Adelaide: Free Web Books, Online)

Paradoxes of Catholicism by Robert Hugh Benson

On Sundays and feast days, I read the sermons of Father Francis Xavier Weninger. Here are some links to where you can download these books for free (they were published before 1900):

Original, short and practical sermons for every feast of the Ecclesiastical year – 3 sermons for every feast) by Rev. F.X. Weninger, S.J., Doctor of Theology, 2nd edition 1882

Original, short and practical sermons for every Sunday of the Ecclesiastical year – 3 sermons for every Sunday) by Rev. F.X. Weninger, S.J., Doctor of Theology, 2nd edition 1881
Crime and Punishment by Dostevsky is on my list. If you like him check out this lecture

"There are in truth three states of the converted: the beginning,  the middle and the perfection. In the beginning, they experience the charms of sweetness; in the middle, the contests of temptation; and in the end, the fullness of perfection."
-- Pope St. Gregory

“One day, through the Rosary and the Scapular, Our Lady will save the world.”
-- attributed to Saint Domenic
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#18
I am currently working my way through Edward Feser's most recent book, Five Proofs of the Existence of God.  What I have read so far is quite impressive, and even though the book is written for laymen it can still be a little difficult to follow at times, given that I have no philosophical or logical training.  He goes through Five Arguments originating from five philosophers, Aristotle, Aquinas, Augustine, Leibniz, and Plotinus, and shows that these arguments prove that there is a God.  

From what I have read so far, I am most certainly going to be getting some of Feser's other works.
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#19
I'm reading Church History : A Complete History of the Catholic Church to the Present Day by Fr. John Laux.  I'm currently doing a Bible Study on the Acts of the Apostles, so it goes along well.
On the secular side, I'm reading Gulag Archipelago by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, and yes because Jordan Peterson talks about this book a lot!  I'm still in the first chapter but so far I think it is good reading for the majority of Westerners to understand what totalitarianism is.  Especially those wearing Che t-shirts and hammer and sickle hats.
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#20
I am reading The Way of Perfection by St Teresa of Avila.
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