Question about Trade School and Vocational Schools?
#1
Has anyone on the forum been in trade school or vocational school? 

Just a couple questions I had about it:

If you did, what was your field (mechanics, electronics, plumbing, construction, etc.)?
How long did it take you to complete courses?
How much was the cost?
When you were finished, how soon did you get employed?
How much room from growth is there in the field you work in? 
Is it possible to double up, e.g. taking courses in plumbing while also doing the same for auto mechanics?
Reply
#2
It took a one year program called trades fundamentals. It there was welding, plumbing, carpentry and electrical. It cost about 2k Canadian each semester. Personally I hated it and was probably the worst in the program at everything.
[-] The following 1 user Likes For Petes Sake's post:
  • Justin Alphonsus
Reply
#3
This is secondhand, but my eldest daughter (number two child) attended a local vocational school for the last two years of high school, as did most of her friends. While there were aspects I did not care for, overall, I would say that they largely benefitted from the time spent. Each had to declare an area of general study, and if possible, a particular specialty. My daughter was in the biomedical program, for instance. So far as I know, it wasn't, in their program, possible to double up.
Eternal Father, I offer Thee the most precious blood of Thy Divine Son, Jesus, in union with the Masses said Throughout the world today, for all the holy souls in Purgatory. Amen.
[-] The following 1 user Likes dahveed's post:
  • Justin Alphonsus
Reply
#4
When I was in high school in my junior and senior years, years ago. I went to a vocational school. In the morning I attended high school and in the afternoon I got on a bus and went to vocational school. It didn't cost anylthing.

I took automotive diagnostics. It was a 2 year school. They helped with job placement. I enlisted in the army right after high school as a tank mechanic, but if remember correctly they had a 70% placement rate of their students. Auto mechanics has pretty good growth, and the pay is good but there is always something new so continuing education is always needed. After the army I was a manager of an auto parts store so I did use my education. I have since retired.

I believe we emphize college too much, vocational and trade schools are very important. They are becoming forgotten.
Bob

If my dog doesn't like you maybe I shouldn't either!!

“No one in the world can change Truth!”
St. Maximilian Kolbe, PRAY FOR US!
[-] The following 1 user Likes BobR67's post:
  • Justin Alphonsus
Reply
#5
I went to trade school to learn machining. It was an 18 month program which I finished in a year due to some previous experience. Cost was cheap, and it was completely covered by pell grants. The prospects are good in the field depending where you are... i.e. not around here. Still, I did OK at it.

Also something to look out for. Industry leaders claiming they can't find qualified workers. That is code for, they can't find superhuman workers willing to work for $8.50 per hour.
[-] The following 2 users Like MRW_67's post:
  • BobR67, Justin Alphonsus
Reply
#6
(04-13-2018, 11:35 AM)Justin Alphonsus Wrote: Has anyone on the forum been in trade school or vocational school? 

Just a couple questions I had about it:

If you did, what was your field (mechanics, electronics, plumbing, construction, etc.)?
How long did it take you to complete courses?
How much was the cost?
When you were finished, how soon did you get employed?
How much room from growth is there in the field you work in? 
Is it possible to double up, e.g. taking courses in plumbing while also doing the same for auto mechanics?

Hi Justin, I took a vocational course back in the 90's so my info is long out of date but I think is still somewhat relevant.
I took a course of training in Computer Networking which really ought to have been called how to obtain your Microsoft certifications in a few months. It was all the rage back then.
The course itself was two years length but I was able to complete it in just under 18 months due to much of it being self paced after some initial requirements. Also, I was able to intern at the school I attended which gave me some much needed experience at the time.
The cost was nominal compared to some other places such as schools like ITT Tech etc. I was retraining due to a chronic illness which left me unable to work in my prior career.
I was employed before I left school. This is doable if you are motivated and if the program is a good one in a field of high demand. You can check this yourself before signing on with a request for placement references which the school should be willing to provide. If they are not, or give you the run around, I would view that very skeptically. I spoke with several people who had been employed before completing the program and gave good reviews.
The potential for growth in my field was only limited by my personal ambition and abilities. I fared quite well over the years and started at a very entry level position. I made many sacrifices over the years however as anyone does to propel themselves upward.
Rather than doubling up on courses I would advise focusing your abilities and attention on one subject fully before moving on to another unless you have a particular reason for it such as general contractor certification or something. You should be able to complete early this way as well as then find gainful employment. You can then decide if employment is going to be more beneficial to focus your attention and efforts on before continuing to pursue other areas of interest. A house divided and all that.
I found that although my area of training was one in which certifications and degrees were looked highly upon I had very little time to pursue them after taking a position with an employer. This was in part because I had found a niche and was able to capitalize on it and become an expert in this area which I devoted my time to. This never hurt me going forward to positions at other employers. My experience made up for this due to the nature being technical.
Vocational schools IME can be a great way for someone to find opportunities in trades which are up and coming or the demand is very high for. It helps a lot if you have aptitude in the field which you are hoping to enter.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)