Early Christianity in the British Isles
#1
Interesting article about Early Christianity in the British Isles. Although it's from an Orthodox website, the information is valuable. This article also mentions Eastern Christian refugees living in Rome. I never knew that there were Syrian Christians living in Rome at that time until I read this article.
http://orthochristian.com/29829.html

Apparently it was the Syrians who brought "Agnus Dei" with them to Rome and it was unknown in that part of Christendom.
https://books.google.com/books?id=TfLaAg...me&f=false
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#2
Some other other excellent resources for early British Christianity are the back issues of the now defunct Orthodox England magazine, and the books The Age of Bede and Beedes Ecclesiastical History of the English People. Beware,while Orthodox England has some very detailed and well written pieces about early British Christianity the general tone of the magazine and the priest affiliated with it is polemical and somewhat distasteful.
Walk before God in simplicity, and not in subtleties of the mind. Simplicity brings faith; but subtle and intricate speculations bring conceit; and conceit brings withdrawal from God. -Saint Isaac of Syria, Directions on Spiritual Training


"It is impossible in human terms to exaggerate the importance of being in a church or chapel before the Blessed Sacrament as often and for as long as our duties and state of life allow. I very seldom repeat what I say. Let me repeat this sentence. It is impossible in human language to exaggerate the importance of being in a chapel or church before the Blessed Sacrament as often and for as long as our duties and state of life allow. That sentence is the talisman of the highest sanctity. "Father John Hardon
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#3
I'm not as familiar as I should be with this subject considering I'm from the UK. I know that St Alban (who gave his name to the town that was called Verulamium in Roman times) is considered to be the first British Christian martyr. Going forward to Anglo-Saxon times I don't know how true the story is of the Pope of the time seeing two blonde Angle boys for sale as slaves said they were "not Angles but Angels" and ordered matters to be put in hand to convert the Anglo-Saxons and Augustine (of Canterbury) was charged with the task. There is another story that when a missionary was talking with an Anglo-Saxon lord on the subject of Christianity somebody remarked that people come into this life like a sparrow that flies through the house and then out again, so there would be no harm in at least listening to the missionary.
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#4
(08-06-2018, 08:57 AM)St Patricks Helpmate Wrote: There is another story that when a missionary was talking with an Anglo-Saxon lord on the subject of Christianity somebody remarked that people come into this life like a sparrow that flies through the house and then out again, so there would be no harm in at least listening to the missionary.

This story was told by The Venerable Bede in his The Ecclesiastical History of the English People.  In Northumbria of the seventh century, King Edwin called a meeting to decide if missionaries should be allowed to preach.  Paulinus had tried to convert Edwin to become a Christian, but Edwin wished to consult his friends and advisors.  The chief priest Coifi recommended that Edwin follow the teaching of Christianity, and another advisor agreed saying:

“The present life of man upon earth, O King, seems to me in
comparison with that time which is unknown to us like the
swift flight of a sparrow through mead-hall where you sit
at supper in winter, with your Ealdormen and thanes,
while the fire blazes in the midst and the hall is warmed,
but the wintry storms of rain or snow are raging abroad.
The sparrow, flying in at one door and immediately out
at another, whilst he is within, is safe from the wintry
tempest, but after a short space of fair weather, he im-
mediately vanishes out of your sight, passing from winter
to winter again. So this life of man appears for a
little while, but of what is to follow or what went before
we know nothing at all. If, therefore, this new doctrine
tells us something more certain, it seems
justly to be followed in our kingdom.”
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

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