The Visigothic / Mozarabic Rite
#21
The Trisagion or Trisagio is a song that arose in Eastern Christendom. As its name suggests, (three times: three times, "Agios: santo") consists of a triple acclamation of the holiness of God:

Holy God, Holy Strong, Holy Immortal, take pity on us.


Its origin dates back to the fifth century, during the catastrophic earthquakes that ravaged Constantinople in 447 and it is said that it was revealed to the people to implore the divine mercy. In doing so, the tremors ceased. Its liturgical introduction is attributed to Saint Proclus, Patriarch of Constantinople. A few years later, in 451, the Council of Chalcedon authorized all the faithful to pray it to invoke the Most Holy Trinity in times of calamity.

The trisagion is an echo of the biblical passage in which the seraphim acclaim the Lord: "Holy, Holy, Holy, almighty Lord" (Is 6,3). Also in the Apocalypse it is repeated "Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord Almighty God, who was, who is and who is coming"

Hispanic-Mozarabic trisagios

In the Hispano-Mozarabic liturgy, as in other Western liturgies, it was introduced by the Eastern churches, as an instrument to combat heresies.

Starting from the primitive trisagios, the Hispanic parents elaborated new texts with marked christological sense in which the power and the royalty of Christ are emphasized by means of the use of texts of the Apocalypse.

The first two trisagios that are shown below are taken from the current Hispano-Mozarabic missal (1). The Trisagion1 appears in the Proper for the Masses of Christmas (year II), Apparition of the Lord (year II), Sunday of Resurrection (years I and II) and Pentecost (years I and II). Trisagion 2 is sung at the Mass of the Circumcision of the Lord (year II). Finally, Trisagion 3 is taken from the old Hispano-Mozarabic missal in which only the Resurrection Sunday was sung.

http://www.hispanomozarabe.es/
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#22
Sanctus Deus, qui sedes super Chérubin, solus invisíbilis.
Sanctus fortis, qui in excélsis glorificáris vócibus angélicis.
Sanctus immortális, qui solus es inmaculátus Salvátor, miserére nobis, allelúia, allelúia.


SV/. Dignus es, Dómine, Deus noster, accípere glóriam et honórem et virtútem.

R/. Sanctus immortális, qui solus es immaculátus Salvátor, miserére nobis, allelúia, allelúia.
V/. Quóniam omnes gentes vénient et adorábunt in conspéctu tuo, Dómine, et dicent:
R/. Miserére nobis, allelúia, allelúia.
V/. Benedíctio et honor et glória et fortitúdo tibi, Deo nostro, in sæcula sæculórum. Amen.
R/. Miserére nobis, allelúia, allelúia.


Holy God, who sits above the Cherubim, only to be invisible.
Holy Mighty, the highest glorification given by the angels.
Holy Immortal, who alone is the perfect Savior, have mercy upon us, alleluia.
Sv/ You are worthy, O Lord, to receive glory and honor and power.
R/ You are the Holy Immortal, who are the only immaculate  Savior, have mercy upon us, alleluia .
Sv/ All the nations will come and worship before you, Lord, and say:
R/ Have mercy on us, alleluia.
Sv/ Blessings and honor and glory and strength to our God for ever and ever. Amen.
R/ Have mercy on us, alleluia.

http://www.hispanomozarabe.es/

I am trying to take from the Latin which is the original.
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#23
Hágios o Theos,
Hágios Ischyrós,
Hágios Athánatos,
eléison himas.

(Holy God, Holy Strong, Holy Immortal, take pity on us.)



V/. Sanctus Deus,
Sanctus fortis,
Sanctus immortális,
miserére nobis.


(Holy God, Holy Strong, Holy Immortal, take pity on us.)

R/. Hágios Athánatos, eléison himas.

(Holy Immortal, take pity on us.)


V/. Doxa Patri ke Hyio ke Hágio Pneúmati, ke nyn ai ke is tus eónas ton eónon. Amin.

(Glory to the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit, now and forever for ever and ever. Amen.)

R/. Hágios Athánatos, eléison himas.

(Holy Immortal, take pity on us.)

http://www.hispanomozarabe.es/

It should be noted that this Trisagion is in the Greek. Just as in the Traditional mass we retain the original Greek when we say teh Kyrie Eleison so the Mozarabis rite contains a little bit more of the Greek that existed when Greek was originally used in the Liturgy.
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#24
(05-22-2018, 12:14 AM)Poche Wrote: Here is the creed in Latin and a rough translation that is for the Mozarabic rite.

CREDIMUS


Crédimus in unum Deum Patrem omnipoténtem,
Factórem cæli et terræ,
visibílium ómnium et invisibílium Conditórem.

Et in unum Dóminum nostrum Iesum Christum,
Fílium Dei Unigénitum,
et ex Patre natum ante ómnia sæcula.
Deum ex Deo, Lumen ex Lúmine.
Deum verum ex Deo vero,
Natum non factum, Omoúsion Patri,
hoc est, eiúsdem cum Patre substántiæ,
Per quem ómnia facta sunt,
quæ in cælo, et quæ in terra.

Qui propter nos hómines, et propter nostram salútem,
descendit de cælis,
et incarnátus est de Spíritu Sancto ex María Vírgine,
et homo factus est.
Passus sub Póntio Piláto, sepúltus,
tértia die resurréxit,
ascéndit ad cælos,
sedet ad déxteram Dei Patris omnipoténtis.
Inde ventúrus est iudicáre vivos et mórtuos,
cuius regni non erit finis.

Et in Spíritum Sanctum, Dóminum vivificatórem,
et ex Patre et Fílio procedéntem.
Cum Patre et Fílio adorándum et conglorificándum.
Qui locútus est per prophétas.

Et unam, sanctam, Cathólicam et Apostólicam Ecclésiam.
Confitémur unum baptísma in remissiónem peccatórum.
Expectámus resurrectiónem mortuórum
et vitam ventúri sæculi.
Amen.

We believe in one God, the Father Almighty;
Maker of heaven and earth;
visible and invisible.

And in one Lord Jesus Christ,
The only begotten
And the Father before all ages.
We name God from God, Light from Light.
Very God of Very God, begotten,
The child is not made, of one omousion be to the Father,
This is the same with another substance;
Through him all things were made;
in heaven and on earth.

For us men and for our salvation
He came down from heaven;
And the power of the Holy Spirit of the Virgin Mary
and was made man.

He suffered under buried in
the third day;
He descended into
seated at the right hand of the Father.
Come again to judge the living and the dead;
and his kingdom will have no end.

And in the Holy our life-giving;
and from the Father and the Son mouth.
With the Father and the Son he is worshiped and glorified.
He has spoken through the prophets.

In One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church.
We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness.
Resurrection of the body
and the life.
Amen.
very cool to memorize it in Latin, my friends will be impress
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#25
(06-01-2018, 03:24 AM)MalachorV8 Wrote:
(05-22-2018, 12:14 AM)Poche Wrote: Here is the creed in Latin and a rough translation that is for the Mozarabic rite.

CREDIMUS


Crédimus in unum Deum Patrem omnipoténtem,
Factórem cæli et terræ,
visibílium ómnium et invisibílium Conditórem.

Et in unum Dóminum nostrum Iesum Christum,
Fílium Dei Unigénitum,
et ex Patre natum ante ómnia sæcula.
Deum ex Deo, Lumen ex Lúmine.
Deum verum ex Deo vero,
Natum non factum, Omoúsion Patri,
hoc est, eiúsdem cum Patre substántiæ,
Per quem ómnia facta sunt,
quæ in cælo, et quæ in terra.

Qui propter nos hómines, et propter nostram salútem,
descendit de cælis,
et incarnátus est de Spíritu Sancto ex María Vírgine,
et homo factus est.
Passus sub Póntio Piláto, sepúltus,
tértia die resurréxit,
ascéndit ad cælos,
sedet ad déxteram Dei Patris omnipoténtis.
Inde ventúrus est iudicáre vivos et mórtuos,
cuius regni non erit finis.

Et in Spíritum Sanctum, Dóminum vivificatórem,
et ex Patre et Fílio procedéntem.
Cum Patre et Fílio adorándum et conglorificándum.
Qui locútus est per prophétas.

Et unam, sanctam, Cathólicam et Apostólicam Ecclésiam.
Confitémur unum baptísma in remissiónem peccatórum.
Expectámus resurrectiónem mortuórum
et vitam ventúri sæculi.
Amen.

We believe in one God, the Father Almighty;
Maker of heaven and earth;
visible and invisible.

And in one Lord Jesus Christ,
The only begotten
And the Father before all ages.
We name God from God, Light from Light.
Very God of Very God, begotten,
The child is not made, of one omousion be to the Father,
This is the same with another substance;
Through him all things were made;
in heaven and on earth.

For us men and for our salvation
He came down from heaven;
And the power of the Holy Spirit of the Virgin Mary
and was made man.

He suffered under buried in
the third day;
He descended into
seated at the right hand of the Father.
Come again to judge the living and the dead;
and his kingdom will have no end.

And in the Holy our life-giving;
and from the Father and the Son mouth.
With the Father and the Son he is worshiped and glorified.
He has spoken through the prophets.

In One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church.
We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness.
Resurrection of the body
and the life.
Amen.
very cool to memorize it in Latin, my friends will be impress
The tradition of the Mozarabic rite is to say it in the plural while the Roman rite says it in the singular.
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#26
Sanctus Deus, qui sedes super Chérubin, solus invisíbilis.
Sanctus fortis, qui in excélsis glorificáris vócibus angélicis.
Sanctus immortális, qui solus es inmaculátus Salvátor, miserére nobis, allelúia.

V/. [i]Dignus es, Dómine, Deus noster, accípere glóriam et honórem et virtútem.
R/. Sanctus fortis.
V/. Quóniam omnes gentes vénient et adorábunt in conspéctu tuo, Dómine, et dicent:
R/. Sanctus immortális.
V/. Benedíctio et honor et glória, virtus et potéstas tibi, Deo nostro, in sæcula sæculórum. Amen.
R/. Miserére nobis, allelúia.
[/i]

Holy God, who sits above the cherubim, only to be invisible.
Holy Mighty, the highest who the angels glorify.
Holy Immortal One, who is the only immaculate Savior, have mercy on us, Alleluia.

V/ You are worthy, O Lord, to receive glory and honor and power.
R/ Holy Powerful one
V/ Who all nations will come and worship
R/ Holy Immortal One
V/ All nations will come and worship before thee, O and say.
R/ Holy and Immortal one
V/ he blessing and honor and glory, power to our God for ever and ever. Amen.
R/ Have mercy on us, Alleluia

http://www.hispanomozarabe.es/
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#27
Introduction.

On the litanies of the saints the Directory on popular piety and the liturgy (1) teaches us the following:

With the singing of the Litanies of the Saints, an agile, simple, popular liturgical structure, witnessed in Rome since the beginning of the seventh century, the Church invokes the Saints in some great sacramental celebrations and in other moments in which their prayer is made more fervent: at the Easter Vigil, before blessing the baptismal font; in the celebration of baptism; in the episcopal, presbyteral and diaconal ordination; in the rite of the consecration of the virgins and in the religious profession; in the dedication of the church and the altar; in rogatives, in seasonal Masses and in penitential processions; when he wants to remove the Evil One through exorcisms and when he entrusts the dying to the mercy of God.

The Litanies of the Saints, which contain elements from the liturgical tradition together with others of popular origin, are an expression of the Church's confidence in the intercession of the Saints and their experience of the communion of life between the Church of Jerusalem celestial and the Church still a pilgrim in the earthly city. The names of the Blesseds, which are inscribed in the liturgical calendars of the dioceses and religious Institutes, can be invoked in the Litanies of the Saints. Obviously the names of people whose worship is not recognized can not be introduced into the Litanies.

In addition, the recitation of litanies has partial indulgence according to the Manual of Indulgences (2).

http://www.hispanomozarabe.es/
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#28
Litanies of the saints in ancient Hispano-Mozarab manuscripts.

In the Liber Mozarabicus Sacramentarum (3) you can find ancient litanies belonging to a Liber Canticorum et Horarum of 1059 copied by Cristoforo for Queen Sancha, wife of Ferdinand I, King of Castile and Leon, who later passed on to his daughter, Dona Urraca and that is currently preserved in the General University Library of Salamanca. The litanies follow a particular "I confess" that includes a brief examination of conscience. In these litanies highlights the presence of a good number of saints of Hispanic origin.


http://www.hispanomozarabe.es/
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#29
Litanies of the saints in the Missale Mixtum hispano-mozárabe.

The ancient Missale Mixtum (4) contemplated that the litanies of the saints would be sung, as in the Roman rite, during the Easter Vigil. The first part during the procession that led to the baptistery where the priest proceeded to the blessing of the water and the second part (from the invocations to Christ) during the procession back. These litanies were introduced in the Missale Mixtum by Canon Alfonso Ortiz, his compiler, who adapted those of a Roman-Toledano missal by substituting a series of saints (Cleto, Sixto, Cornelio, Cipriano, Marcial, Catalina and Margarita) for others, on all Hispanics, many of them with their own Masses in the missal: Cherub, Serafin, Eugenio, Cristóbal, Ginés, Román, Blas, Zoilo, Antolín, Saturnino, Jorge, Justo and Pastor, Germán, Fernando (Servando) Leandro, Isidro, Ildefonso , Julian, Egidio, Francisco, Domingo, Antonio, Bernardo, Ana, Cristina, Justa and Rufina, Leocadia, Eulalia, Marina, Columba, Eufemia and Faith. The list of saints presents divergences with respect to the Liber Mozarabicus Sacramentarum mentioned above.

The new Hispano-Mozarabic Missal has notably enriched the liturgy of the Easter Vigil by recovering the texts of Tradition A and eliminating the less genuine elements of Roman-Toledo origin that had been added to Missale Mixtum, like the litanies of the saints. Thus, the baptismal liturgy is interspersed between the first and second part of the liturgy of the Word. In Year I the first part ends with a Psallendum that closes the eleven readings and the canticles of the Old Testament, so that it is that Psallendum that serves as a processional song until the baptismal font. In Year II the twelve readings and the canticles of the Old Testament that form the first part end with the Benedictus, which is in this case the song that accompanies the procession to the fountain or baptistery.

Anyway, being the litanies of the saints prayer approved by the Church and susceptible to be used in other occasions, we collect here those that have been used for more than four centuries, as one more element of the Hispanic-Mozarabic liturgical and devotional heritage . Only, for clarity, we have added the subdivision into groups and their corresponding titles with respect to the text of the Missal. In brackets [] we indicate the request for the blessing of the baptismal font, which can be suppressed because it is characteristic of the Easter Vigil in which these litanies are no longer prayed.

http://www.hispanomozarabe.es/
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#30
Litaniæ sanctorum

I. SUPPLICATIO AD DEUM


Kyrie, eleison.
R/.
Kyrie, eleison.
Christe, eleison.
R/. Christe, eleison.
Kyrie, eleison.
R/. Kyrie, eleison.
Christe, audi nos.
R/. Christe, audi nos.
Christe, exaudi nos.
R/. Christe, exaudi nos.
Christe, defende nos.
R/. Christe, defende nos.
Pater de cælis, Deus.
R/.
Miserere nobis.
Filii, Redemptor mundi, Deus.
R/.
Miserere nobis.
Spiritus Sancte, Deus.
R/.
Miserere nobis.
Sancta Trinitas, unus Deus.
R/.
Miserere nobis.
Sancte sanctorum Deus.
R/.
Miserere nobis.

http://www.hispanomozarabe.es/
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