Feeling Welcome at Church
#21
(05-09-2018, 09:36 PM)BenedicamDominum Wrote:
(05-09-2018, 03:56 PM)CaptCrunch73 Wrote: To more directly answer your question it's pretty much be friendly and say hello to new people...

It seems to be a phrase that's almost exclusively used within the context of folks living in manifestly sinful lifestyles.

Ok I will most certainly pass that thought along to the priest at the parish I attend...
"There are in truth three states of the converted: the beginning,  the middle and the perfection. In the beginning, they experience the charms of sweetness; in the middle, the contests of temptation; and in the end, the fullness of perfection."
-- Pope St. Gregory

“One day, through the Rosary and the Scapular, Our Lady will save the world.”
-- attributed to Saint Domenic
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#22
(05-09-2018, 09:43 PM)CaptCrunch73 Wrote:
(05-09-2018, 09:36 PM)BenedicamDominum Wrote:
(05-09-2018, 03:56 PM)CaptCrunch73 Wrote: To more directly answer your question it's pretty much be friendly and say hello to new people...

It seems to be a phrase that's almost exclusively used within the context of folks living in manifestly sinful lifestyles.

Ok I will most certainly pass that thought along to the priest at the parish I attend...

I meant that as more of a question. I should have added "Am I wrong in that analysis?" as a second sentence.
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#23
I see Priests on twitter say that kids should be allowed to make noise and run around during mass so that they feel welcome.
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#24
The Protestant churches in my area are pretty good at welcoming people, meeting new folks at the door, saying hi in the hallways, etc.  Out in the country they still have pot luck dinners after Sunday services.    Perhaps I just like the Southern/rural way of socializing, which is very Protestant - the community and its connections are central and talking to strangers is normal.
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The Catholic Churches I have attended sometimes have Bible study but I have found the classes really basic and boring.  The people were nice, tho.  There is also coffee and donuts after some Masses, but I have never attended those because walking into a room full of people who all already know each other is not comfortable for me.  Signing up for volunteer work is a good way to make new friends, but frankly, no matter what parish I have attended it seems that the parish is for the families who attend the school and the rest of us are not as central to the plan.  Don't get me wrong, I attended the parish school, my daughter attended Catholic school and I truly understand that focus.  However, I can't afford to put a child thru the parish school anymore (over $8,000 per year, per child) so we are on the "outside".  The priests seem very open to saying hello (all give off that good vibe, if you will excuse the term), but there is always a long line of people who want to "talk to Father" after every Mass.
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Being warm and welcoming is just not part of our culture, which is a shame.  I am not really the person to step up and change that culture.  I do feel bad for the kids, tho, they need to make Catholic friends.
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#25
(05-09-2018, 03:24 PM)BenedicamDominum Wrote: I hear a lot of talk about how folks ought to "feel welcome" at church.  What exactly does that mean?  Is that just some kind of a buzz phrase for Modernistic happy-clappyism?  Is there any actually Catholic spiritual reason for being overly concerned with this sort of thing?

Forgive me if I sound annoyed, but I was reading a thread over on another forum and was once again struck by how God in the Liturgy is almost an afterthought ....

Are you in a situation where you have sat next to people for years and yet have no idea even their names?
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#26
(05-09-2018, 10:41 PM)For Petes Sake Wrote: I see Priests on twitter say that kids should be allowed to make noise and run around during mass so that they feel welcome.

I have seen priests say the opposite at mass. In fact before every mass they make an announcement that if you have small children who are unable to sit still then there is a place where they can be taken so as not to distract others who are trying to pray.
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#27
We began attending a Latin Mass (Diocesan) Parish last Summer.  Every month there is a coffee and donuts Sunday where the "long-timers" make an effort to reach out and introduce themselves to new people.  Sometimes they even have get-to-know-you games.  There is an evangelization team that actually goes door-to-door telling people about the Tridentine Mass.   Within months my husband was invited to join the usher team.  All of these things helped us to feel at home even though we are very new to traditional Catholicism.  Before we began attending, at our previous Parish, people would talk about how closed off and cliquey the "Latin Massers" are, they could not have been more wrong.  Its so refreshing to meet people who take their Faith seriously! There are no sideways glances at people who show up in jeans or other clothes (as long as its modest) instead its pretty much automatic parishioners will go up to them after Mass to introduce themselves and welcome them.  
I suppose this doesn't go along with modernist ideas of welcoming, the Mass is not the place for socializing, but its wonderful to stay afterwards to socialize!
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#28
(05-09-2018, 10:41 PM)For Petes Sake Wrote: I see Priests on twitter say that kids should be allowed to make noise and run around during mass so that they feel welcome.

So priests have actually said they encourage children to run around during mass?  Or are they saying they understand how kids are and we shouldn't exclude them because they are children?  

Also are these what we would consider a normal priest or are these extreme liberal priests?
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#29
Mass is about Jesus, no doubt. The problem arises when their is no sense of community. So all who go to church are Catholic. The problem is no necessarily during mass being all friendly but its about before and after the mass. The other 6 days a week and the other 23 hours of the day on Sunday. If we just show up to mass and have no interaction with others and then leave, we are more than likely going back into the secular world and are surrounded by secularists and their beliefs and we may be the only Catholic among the group. Which then leads us to keep our faith inside since there is no one to talk to and help strengthen us with our faith. We can evangalize yes, but not necessarily be helped to grow in our faith. Look at the Apostles. They went out and evangalized the non believers and shared the word of God. Although when need be they could turn to each other and talk about the faith and I am sure help each other grow in holiness. That is what we should be striving for.

This is a perfect reason for me personally why we have not joined the nearest church that does the Latin Mass or go there on a consistant basis. For us its a 30 minute drive give or take. Although by going to this church means all my children will not be able to form Catholic friendships who will be a positive Catholic example for my children. I mean its not feasable to do a lot of play dates when the drive there and back in an hour each time. Its not feasible to go to daily mass there so they can interact with their friends there. Its not feasible to be a part of different things at the church on a daily basis for my children. So then I am left with us going to mass but have no community for my children to interact with because of distance. So they get no fellowship from the people they know are Catholic except on Sundays during and immediatly after mass. Or I find I good NO parish around here and find a good community for my children where they can interact with other Catholic children on a daily or weekly basis. They are then around other children numerous times per week who share their faith and morals as opposed to just being around secularists.

We as Catholics need to do a better job (me included) of making people feel more welcome and part of the community so they don't fall away. We need to treat them like the parable of the prodigal son. When we see these people come back to the church or are just new to the church we need to roll out the red carpet to make them feel welcome. This will cause the community to grow. Something to think about also. Just imagine if we as just American Catholics were a true community and of like mind and worked together what could be done in this country when it comes to policy and politics. We could change so much if we were all united as a community.
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#30
(05-09-2018, 03:24 PM)BenedicamDominum Wrote: I hear a lot of talk about how folks ought to "feel welcome" at church.  What exactly does that mean?  Is that just some kind of a buzz phrase for Modernistic happy-clappyism?  Is there any actually Catholic spiritual reason for being overly concerned with this sort of thing?

Forgive me if I sound annoyed, but I was reading a thread over on another forum and was once again struck by how God in the Liturgy is almost an afterthought ....

laugh

yeh, i know. Yrs ago, b4 I was a daily Mass attendee and etc.. i had this anti-Catholic, former Catholic (worst ones) "friend" who was always trying to find a better church(re-invent the wheel) and so she dragged me to one of those happy-clappy "churches" (laugh at that term) and then we'd try another. At that time, I wasn't anti-Catholic (never have been), wasn't outside the Church (as I was a few yrs b4 I met this "friend") but also was not well-versed in Catholic teaching and history (that came soon afterwards, though).

Well, anyway, the point is that when you are not catchized (as this friend, who had had some bad experiences in Catholic schools and that's why she was anti-Catholic) you will end up going to just any old "church" and believing just any old thing..
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