Is tomorrow a new holy day of obligation?
#1
Someone after Mass said that it was, but I suspect he was wrong. Does anyone know?  I don't believe it is a holy day of obligation.
Reply
#2
Why would it be? It's in the Octave of Pentecost and it would be St Celestine's day if it weren't that. Neither of them has ever been a Holy Day of Obligation, as far as I know, at least in the last century.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


Reply
#3
Before 1911 Pentecost Monday was a Holy Day of Obligation in the Universal Church. (So, Jovan, you lucked out by about 7 years in saying "in the last century")

Pentecost Tuesday was a Holy Day of Obligation before 1771, and a Synod at Constance in 1094 was when the obligation was limited to the first three days (Sunday, Monday and Tuesday).

Part of the confusion comes in confusing Holy Days of Obligation in the Universal Church, and which are applied to local places.

Before the 1983 Rubrics, only with Papal approval could a country, diocese or region suppress or add to these days, but it was still often done. For instance, in Ireland, St. Patrick was a Holy Day of Obligation, but St. Joseph was not. In the U.S. Epiphany was not, nor was Corpus Christi, Sts. Peter and Paul or St. Joseph.

After 1983 the local bishops conferences were given the power to do this unilaterally.

To my knowledge only Germany preserves Pentecost Monday as a Holy Day of Obligation.

All of these days of obligation before the 1960 Rubrics were Double Feasts of the First Class. In the 1960 Rubrics they are First Class feasts. 

Sometimes the confusion comes when people start trying to find the "traditional" days of obligation and confused universal for local, but also they assume that all Doubles of the First Class, or First Class Feasts are days of Obligation. 

While all Holy Days are First Class Feasts, not all First Class feasts are or were Holy Days.

Also Easter Monday and Pentecost Monday were still, in many Catholic countries, public holidays because of the former obligation on these days, so sometimes you will find those still listed in the public calendar, and thus assume that there must be a corresponding Holy Day.

For instance, Wikipedia says that Pentecost Monday is still a public holiday in Antigua and Barbuda, Anguilla, Austria, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, Cyprus, Denmark, Dominica, France, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Hungary, Iceland, Ivory Coast, Luxembourg, Monaco, Montserrat, the Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Saint Lucia, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Solomon Islands, Switzerland, Togo and Ukraine.

Pentecost Monday and Tuesday were until 1960 Doubles of the First Class, now the whole week is part of a First Class Octave.

But, in short, no where in the world aside from Germany is there an obligation of attending Mass or abstaining from servile work on Pentecost Monday.
Reply
#4
I believe he's referring to the new "Mary Mother of the Church" or whatever it's called.
Surréxit Dóminus vere, Alleluia!
Reply
#5
The new Feast of Mary, Mother of the Church is not a holy day of obligation, but only a new feast added to the calendar, the same as any other feast that's been added.

It's not celebrated in the 1962 Calendar, since Pentecost Monday is a I Class Feast, which allows no Commemorations of feasts, and the new feast is a Memorial, which is like a III Class Feast, so it's not transferred.
Reply
#6
No, tomorrow is not a holy day of obligation. It would be good if you could get to mass, however if you are unable to go then it is not an obligation.
Reply
#7
Thank you all.
Reply
#8
Isn't the Queenship of Mary also on May 31? Or is that no longer on the current calendar/moved to a different date? 

Depending on when Pentecost is, these two feasts would be super close to each other. I'd assume the Queenship of Mary would be moved depending on when Pentecost falls anyway. In 2020, Pentecost is May 31st.

Overall, I can't really complain about a feast day called Mary, Mother of the Church. Although, it's silly to create such a feast day and not create a special liturgy for it. Then again, I'd assume that we don't have very many special liturgies in the Novus Ordo.
Blood of Christ, relief of the burdened, save us.

“It is my design to die in the brew house; let ale be placed in my mouth when I am expiring, that when the choirs of angels come, they may say, “Be God propitious to this drinker.” – St. Columbanus, A.D. 612
Reply
#9
The Queenship of Mary is a recent feast, added in 1955. In the new calendar, it's on 22 August, the former Octave Day of the Assumption, and, also recently, the Immaculate Heart of Mary, which was moved to the Saturday after the Sacred Heart.

This new Feast is Mary, Mother of the Church, which isn't a new title but I'm not familiar with what exactly it is.
Reply
#10
(05-21-2018, 01:02 PM)GangGreen Wrote: Isn't the Queenship of Mary also on May 31? Or is that no longer on the current calendar/moved to a different date? 

Depending on when Pentecost is, these two feasts would be super close to each other. I'd assume the Queenship of Mary would be moved depending on when Pentecost falls anyway. In 2020, Pentecost is May 31st.

Overall, I can't really complain about a feast day called Mary, Mother of the Church. Although, it's silly to create such a feast day and not create a special liturgy for it. Then again, I'd assume that we don't have very many special liturgies in the Novus Ordo.

The Queenship of Mary has been moved to the Octave Day of the Assumption, 22 August.

And even in the TLM, there aren't many 'special liturgies' except for the great feasts. Usually just a proper collect, communion, and post communion, with the rest from the common of whatever sort of Saint it it is, the BVM, a Martyr, Doctor, Confessor, Virgin, etc., which is pretty much what they do in the NO as well.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)