Do the laity have right's to the priests house?
#1
Greetings friends
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#2
Are you serious? 

You can't force yourself into someone's home, doesn't sound like it's the priest who's out of control. 

I really hope this is a troll.
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#3
Pretty much my thoughts as well. And writing to the Bishop over this matter seems like an extremely stupid idea.
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#4
(06-06-2018, 05:04 PM)Patmappas28 Wrote: Greetings friends,

I've been at my parish for a couple months and I've noticed that my priest is not as holy as I thought he was. He's in spiritual adolescence, it's absolutely apparent. I've been trying to discipline him but each time I enter into the rectory he kicks me out. His heart is attached to power and he goes around oppressing everyone that he's in charge of. The other day I had a debate with him and he told me that I wasn't his friend but is father (oppressor) and he kicked me out of the rectory building. I have witnesses to this too. What I need is advice on how to handle this crucial problem. Do the laity have rights to assert themselves into the rectory? I'm going to write a letter to my local bishop so he can be reprimanded because this man is out of control.

Firstly, being a child of God and Holy Mother the Church, God cares for you by sending to you a man who is meant to be your spiritual father and direct you. It may happen that this man is imperfect and even sinful. Your duty is to act towards him as a child to a father, asking what you need, and treating him with that degree of respect. You should pray for him, and support him like a child does his father.

Just as it may happen, however, that a father makes mistakes or even becomes abusive, the same can happen with a priest. If it is a grave harm to your Faith or morals, you may even need to separate yourself from your pastor and entrust yourself to the care of another priest. Such is what happens often with us traddies.

Still, it is not your role to be his spiritual father, to correct him or try to mold him to your image of what he should be. That is not how a child acts toward a father, not even when the child is grown up and perhaps better formed and educated than the father.

Let us consider the scenario that a man had a deadbeat father who was not a good Catholic, often skipped Mass, used foul language and was often drunk and angry, but still managed to raise the children reasonably well. The eldest boy is grown up and realizes how imperfect his childhood was and what a bad state his dad was and is in. How should he act? '

Scenario 1 : "Dad, it's time you learned to be a real man, so here's the program I've designed to make you into a good Catholic man, and we're off to the Ignatian retreat next week. I've taken the liberty to tell your work you'll be out for the week, and also arranged for you to spend time in a Carthusian monastery for the next month to do penance for the terrible childhood you inflicted on my sisters and brothers."

Scenario 2 : "Dad, I'm thankful for all you have done for us children, but you know there are certain things that really bothered me as a child. Especially, I always was troubled by you often not going to Mass. You know, that's something really important to me, it would be really an encouragement to me now if you would come with me on Sunday. In fact, you know what I think would be really great is if you might come on a retreat with me. I'll arrange everything if you want me to, but it would, I think, be a great way to help you, and it would really mean a lot to me. I'm also going to visit a great monastery in a while. You know, it's an amazing place. If you wanted to come with me, I'd be happy to bring you along."

The former is the way a man might speak to a disobedient child. The latter is how a grown man might speak to he errant father.

If you think there is some moral, spiritual or other problems with a priest the first thing you should do is to pray for him and make some sacrifices, and step back from the judgemental attitude. Consider whether you are correctly analyzing the situation. Make sure you are not trying to hold the priest to your own standard.

If you do see some serious problem, then approach the priest in a child-like way, and ask some non-accusatory questions, express your concerns in a deferential way.

If it really seems there is some grave moral problem, then express yourself more pointedly, but still not in a way as if you are serving as his judge or superior.

If there remains a serious issue then approach his superior, again in a child-like way.

Your complaints, however, sounds like you are the one who are acting like a spoiled teenager, demanding what you want, trying to fix the world and play the role of savior of your family, because you know so much better than them.
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#5
There are more than 2 rooms in most rectories , why not bring along other people to move in. LOL
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#6
(06-06-2018, 07:27 PM)salus Wrote: There are more than 2 rooms in most rectories , why not bring along other people to move in. LOL

How about cleaning it first then inviting seven other in with you ...
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#7
MagisterMusicae, your response is excellent but I feel you wasted your time. This post is clearly a put-on.
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#8
(06-06-2018, 05:04 PM)Patmappas28 Wrote: Greetings friends,

I've been at my parish for a couple months and I've noticed that my priest is not as holy as I thought he was. He's in spiritual adolescence, it's absolutely apparent. I've been trying to discipline him but each time I enter into the rectory he kicks me out. His heart is attached to power and he goes around oppressing everyone that he's in charge of. The other day I had a debate with him and he told me that I wasn't his friend but is father (oppressor) and he kicked me out of the rectory building. I have witnesses to this too. What I need is advice on how to handle this crucial problem. Do the laity have rights to assert themselves into the rectory? I'm going to write a letter to my local bishop so he can be reprimanded because this man is out of control.

Who do you think you are to just barge into the rectory? Go ahead and write a letter to the bishop. I think that you will be the one who the bishop will condemn.
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#9
Simply no. The concept of property rights says no. Replace priest with any number of professions and the answer is no.
Unfortunately I don't have any "fun facts" about me unless being a practicing Catholic counts.

Trying to get better every day week.
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#10
(06-09-2018, 12:38 PM)GRA Wrote: Simply no. The concept of property rights says no. Replace priest with any number of professions and the answer is no.

You mean I can't break into my doctor's house to give him some remedial courses in how to practice medicine?
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