Southern Grit/Depravity/Grace?
#1
Yes, I posted this in another thread, but I thought that it was worth a thread of it own. If you live in the South--or ever have, you know that there is a mythical quality to it. Ivy, magnolia, humidity, mint juleps, guitars, literature, wilting women, and racial concerns. I grew up in Southern California, but my family moved to Mississippi a number of years ago. Honestly, I do not think that I could leave the South--if I were to stay in 'Merica. Despite the Baptist association, the South has a strong Episcopalian foundation. Therefore, the swim through the Tiber from the South is not as long as it may be in, say, Rhode Island. Thus:

The players in this video are from Italy and Wales; however, none of this would have happened without the US South. Only in the South would I have gotten yelled at for having talked during the playing of "Dixie." Another time, at this same honky-tonk, I got into a fight in which we turned over a few tables and spilled a helluva lot of beer, yet the band did not miss a beat. I tapped out when the owner of the bar,who would go on to shoot off a few of his fingers in another incident, elbowed me to back of my head. Really, y'all need to live in the South for at least a year before you can talk about strife and life. 

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#2
My wife and I always talk about moving south, but don't want to leave our families behind. There is just something about the south that the rest of the country is missing. Certainly a more religious people even if they're mostly prots.
Blood of Christ, relief of the burdened, save us.

“It is my design to die in the brew house; let ale be placed in my mouth when I am expiring, that when the choirs of angels come, they may say, “Be God propitious to this drinker.” – St. Columbanus, A.D. 612

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#3
(06-13-2018, 07:16 AM)GangGreen Wrote: My wife and I always talk about moving south, but don't want to leave our families behind. There is just something about the south that the rest of the country is missing. Certainly a more religious people even if they're mostly prots.

The more religious & conservative aspect of life south of MD is a big part of why I stay here.  True, they're largely prots, but they're largely less hostile to Catholicism than the atheist crowd.
-sent by howitzer via the breech.

God's love is manifest in the landscape as in a face.  - John Muir

I want creation to penetrate you with so much admiration that wherever you go, the least plant may bring you clear remembrance of the Creator.  A single plant, a blade of grass, or one speck of dust is sufficient to occupy all your intelligence in beholding the art with which it has been made  - Saint Basil

Heaven is under our feet, as well as over our heads. - Thoreau, Walden
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#4
I spent some time in the South, occasionally between 80-86, and found while it was different, people were typically nicer than alot of other places in the country I've been. Southerners are still negatively stereotyped by people who would never say such things about other groups. Another myth about the Old South, is that outside of Louisiana, it was almost entirely Protestant. Most of the cities and larger towns have Catholic churches that date back to the 19th century.
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#5
I grew up in the South - Louisiana, so the Deep South. It has been positive aspects and there is a Catholic presence in many places, especially in Louisiana. However, there is an anti-Catholic sentiment that most people don't bother to hide. I know you have that in the North as well but in general this is a recent development in the North whereas in the South it is longstanding. Southerners dislike Catholics because they see them as apostates. Northerners dislike us because our moral views are no longer in their mainstream.
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#6
I have never experienced any strong anti-Catholic sentiment in Mississippi. In a way, that worries me, only because an  anti-type religious sentiment shows that people still take religious differences seriously, which I would respect, but do not believe is still the case. Most of (religious) Mississippi is Baptist, with a large Pentecostal presence as well. However, along the MS coast,  the Catholic identity is much more well-formed and evident. I tell people that Catholic Mississippi is such a different beast than Protty Mississippi--and, of course, and a much more enjoyable place to live.

Though monolithic "culture" continues to consume what is unique about a region, Southerners--for now anyway, still, as Flannery O'Connor stated, exhibit a Christ-haunted nature. I have found, by and large, that even the wildest will still not openly and freely disrespect religious beliefs, though they may not hold those beliefs themselves. Those who do, in addition, do not seem quite comfortable with themselves as they do it.
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#7
[Image: c4dca02832f807227843f48e428efda6--writin...quotes.jpg]
"Even if I had all the crimes possible on my conscience...I would simply throw myself into my Saviour's arms... I know that in the twinkling of an eye all those thousands of sins would be consumed as a drop of water cast into a blazing fire."  St. Therese of Lisieux

“a Church which is poorer in doctrine is not more pastoral, but only more ignorant.” ---Cardinal Caffarra

"The only alternative to One Nation under God is all nations under God-knows-what." Joseph Pearce 

Morality is not chronological
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#8




I do luv that old time jam band Southern rock. We catch 'em every time they're in NYC. We like New Orleans for a great time, but honestly nothing is as pretty as Southern Vermont. This is where I will be headed one fine day. They've got the Latin Mass over the boarder in two directions: New York and New Hampshire.


Oooo, Ooooh Ooooh! ETA: one more!



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#9
(06-15-2018, 01:38 AM)Sacred Heart lover Wrote: [Image: c4dca02832f807227843f48e428efda6--writin...quotes.jpg]
Can't read it!
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#10
Don't get me started. Too late!  Big Grin



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