Book about John Paul II?
#1
I'm not if this is the right forum, but I am searching for a book that is critical of John Paul II and it was written before his unfortunate canonization - almost in effort to warn Catholics against it. I've seen this book a few times, but failed to bookmark it. I can't for the life of me remember the author or the title. I do know it's *not* from Angelus press - and it appeared it was the author's only published work. 

I know it's a bit of stretch, but does anyone here know what I am talking about?
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#2
(06-13-2018, 03:03 PM)Vulgate Wrote: I'm not if this is the right forum, but I am searching for a book that is critical of John Paul II and it was written before his unfortunate canonization - almost in effort to warn Catholics against it. I've seen this book a few times, but failed to bookmark it. I can't for the life of me remember the author or the title. I do know it's *not* from Angelus press - and it appeared it was the author's only published work. 

I know it's a bit of stretch, but does anyone here know what I am talking about?

Not sure about the book on Pope John Paul II but there is a book similar to your description about Pope Paul VI, link below

https://www.amazon.com/Paul-Beatified-st...0615417566
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#3
Let us not forget however that his canonisation carries the mark of infallibility, so it is neither unfortunate nor to be warned against.  He is a saint in Heaven worthy of honour, even if not everything he did in life was perfect, just like most every other saint.
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#4
I quote Steven:
Quote:even if not everything he did in life was perfect

Pope St. John Paul II did no wrong.
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#5
(06-14-2018, 11:28 AM)Steven Wrote: Let us not forget however that his canonisation carries the mark of infallibility, so it is neither unfortunate nor to be warned against.  He is a saint in Heaven worthy of honour, even if not everything he did in life was perfect, just like most every other saint.

Infallibility of canonisations extends only to the fact that the person is in heaven. For other saints, canonised before John Paul II abolished the so-called 'devil's advocate', the least bit of unorthodoxy would end the cause. No Pope who allowed Assisi would have been canonised before Vatican II. We're not required to believe that he was a good Pope, only that he made it to heaven.

But that's actually only one opinion - the others are that canonisation includes an infallible declaration of heroic virtue, which is obviously lacking in the case of recent papal canonisations - no Pope exercising heroic virtue would have allowed the present situation the Church finds herself in, nor allowed Vatican II to continue once it was clear the modernists had taken over, nor kissed the Koran, nor permitted Assisi. If that's infallible, the canonisation of John XXIII and John Paul II are wrong, and the sedevacantists are right.

Neither, however, has been defined as a dogma. One who denies the infallibility of canonisations is not a heretic, even if the majority of theologians hold to infallibility.
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#6
(06-14-2018, 01:10 PM)ServusDei Wrote: I quote Steven:
Quote:even if not everything he did in life was perfect

Pope St. John Paul II did no wrong.

I'm curious. What colour is the sun on your planet? Ours is yellow.

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#7
What wrong do you alledge him of? By "did no wrong" I mean that he did not scandalize his office at any point in his papacy, and he remained true to the Catholic Faith.
MonstranceDeo Gratias et Ave Maria! Monstrance
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#8
(06-14-2018, 02:29 PM)ServusDei Wrote: What wrong do you alledge him of? By "did no wrong" I mean that he did not scandalize his office at any point in his papacy, and he remained true to the Catholic Faith.

He accommodated pagans in breaking the first commandment on consecrated Church ground at the Assisi prayer meetings- he was an accessory to breaking the commandment and to sacrilege.


A public act against the Catholic faith, with no public correction or repentance.

That's one for you, do you want more?


And for everyone else: not all mistakes are the same. As noted, this one (and many others) was public act against the Catholic faith with no public correction. Regardless of intention, it is not someone who should be set up as a model to emulate for the faithful. Hence, it was an unfortunate canonization.


(06-14-2018, 11:28 AM)Steven Wrote: Let us not forget however that his canonisation carries the mark of infallibility, so it is neither unfortunate nor to be warned against.  He is a saint in Heaven worthy of honour, even if not everything he did in life was perfect, just like most every other saint.

If canonization is infallible, then it has limited infallibility. Not everyone in heaven should be canonized, because not everyone in heaven should have their lives as an example of heroic virtue and emulation. That is the point.
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#9
Provide me a link to those prayer meetings, I have not heard about that. And who are you to say that a Saint who has performed miracles is not worthy of his title?
MonstranceDeo Gratias et Ave Maria! Monstrance
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#10
(06-14-2018, 02:38 PM)ServusDei Wrote: Provide me a link to those prayer meetings, I have not heard about that. And who are you to say that a Saint who has performed miracles is not worthy of his title?

A link for the Assisi meetings?
 
http://www.letmegooglethat.com/?q=assisi...tings+1986
 
Miracles are not the determining factor if one is safe for emulation. My Grandma could obtain a miracle for me in heaven, but that doesn’t mean she should be canonized because her life is not good for imitation and for the faithful to follow – especially if they were public events without pubic correction. Further, the determination of miracles is not an infallible judgement.
 
Here’s another public scandal for you, from a homily:
 
May Saint John Baptist protect Islam and all the people of Jordan, and all who partecipated in this celebration, a memorable celebration.”
-   John Paul II
 
https://w2.vatican.va/content/john-paul-...arrar.html
 

I can bring up more form the JPII swamp if you want.
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