Suggestions for good books for learning Latin ?
#1
+PAX DOMINUS VOBISCUM+

Any suggestions for good textbooks series to learn Latin from a beginner's level to the intermediate level and so on ? Formats in either PDF or Kindle would be highly appreciated and free of cost would be even better ! However, if the best ones are in the Paperback format, I am open to that. Also, is there a good English-Latin and Latin-English dictionary ? 

Although, I have grasped a minuscule level of Latin thanks to various Traditional Catholic resources, I think I need to work hard on grasping Latin, considering the fact that I attend a Novus Ordo parish which is heavily influenced by an Indian - South Asian cultural background.

God Bless !

Thanks in advance !  Smile
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#2
(07-01-2018, 12:55 PM)AndreasIosephus Wrote: +PAX DOMINUS VOBISCUM+

Any suggestions for good textbooks series to learn Latin from a beginner's level to the intermediate level and so on ? Formats in either PDF or Kindle would be highly appreciated and free of cost would be even better ! However, if the best ones are in the Paperback format, I am open to that. Also, is there a good English-Latin and Latin-English dictionary ? 

Although, I have grasped a minuscule level of Latin thanks to various Traditional Catholic resources, I think I need to work hard on grasping Latin, considering the fact that I attend a Novus Ordo parish which is heavily influenced by an Indian - South Asian cultural background.

God Bless !

Thanks in advance !  Smile
Wheelock’s Latin, 7th edition, Kindle and print format available
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#3
Since you are discerning a vocation to the priesthood, I would avoid Wheelock. Not that it's not a good source for classical Latin, in fact, I used it in school, but 1) the pronunciation of classical Latin, which Wheelock uses, is radically different from that of ecclesiastical Latin, and 2) Wheelock will ignore ecclesiastical words and terminologies. 

Here are some resources for ecclesiastical Latin:

http://www.canonlaw.info/catholicissues_ecclatin.htm

http://frcoulter.com/latin/links.html

And here is a link to the US Amazon page doing a search for 'ecclesiastical Latin'

https://smile.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_1_20?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=ecclesiastical+latin&sprefix=Ecclesiastical+Latin%2Caps%2C473&crid=2FCGBQ6F426U&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Aecclesiastical+latin
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
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#4
What you could do, if you have the means available, if purchase some of the liturgical books of the Latin Rite.  Since you intend upon entering seminary, this will have a triple benefit; that of learning Latin as it is actually used by the Church and familiarizing yourself with the Sacred Liturgy and augmenting your devotional life.

What you could also do is gather some of the works of antiquity and begin reading them in the actual language in which they were written.  You could read Cicero, Seneca, Boethius, Augustine, Aurelius, Caesar, Virgil etc. in the original Latin.  Of course, several of these authors would be writing in Classical Latin, so caveat emptor.
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#5
(07-01-2018, 12:55 PM)AndreasIosephus Wrote: +PAX DOMINUS VOBISCUM+

Any suggestions for good textbooks series to learn Latin from a beginner's level to the intermediate level and so on ? Formats in either PDF or Kindle would be highly appreciated and free of cost would be even better ! However, if the best ones are in the Paperback format, I am open to that. Also, is there a good English-Latin and Latin-English dictionary ? 

Although, I have grasped a minuscule level of Latin thanks to various Traditional Catholic resources, I think I need to work hard on grasping Latin, considering the fact that I attend a Novus Ordo parish which is heavily influenced by an Indian - South Asian cultural background.

God Bless !

Thanks in advance !  Smile
Pax!  Would it be helpful to ask the Order of Priests you are considering for a vocation? 
 God bless, angeltime Heart
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#6
Do the different Orders have different forms of Latin? LOL LOL LOL
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


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#7
Use all four books of Henle Latin. It's what I use in high-school and it is very comprehensive (if that's what you want). It will take you from zero-knowledge of latin to fluent scholar in four years. XD
MonstranceDeo Gratias et Ave Maria! Monstrance
Pray the Rosary
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#8
Peace.....you might want to check into being with others learning also, so you can share your conversation in Latin - it will advance you much quicker than always reading alone.  Perhaps you can get a parish visit from a Latin Priest who can have a workshop - or look for one going on??  God bless, angeltime Heart
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#9
Thank you all for your suggestions !  Smile

What about 'Latin Grammar : Grammar Vocabularies and Exercises in Preparation for the Reading of the Missal and Breviary' by Cora Carroll Scanlon ? 

If anyone has any experience using this book and has the answer key to the exercises, please do provide me the references; it would be of immense help ! 

Thanks, once again !  Smile
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#10
While it's a good idea to take up some books to learn the grammar and get some readings, the grammar is the easy part on which you actually have to do the thinking and reasoning.

Most important is vocabulary. You can easily pick up a Latin text, like the Vulgate, and start looking for words, then going to a Latin Dictionary, finding the root words and making yourself flash cards of those vocabulary words. If you learn 10 words a day in a year you'll have nearly 4,000 words under your belt. That's a very good start. Then all you do with the grammar is apply the rules to these words.

So, pick a method, any method, but start now with vocabulary. 10-20 new words a day. Not difficult, but it will make a huge difference.
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