Numerous universities partake in separate minority ceremonies.
#1
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/02/us/bl...rvard.html


Quote:Looking out over a sea of people in Harvard Yard last week, Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive and one of Harvard’s most famous dropouts, told this year’s graduating class that it was living in an unstable time, when the defining struggle was “against the forces of authoritarianism, isolationism and nationalism.” (America First. American Citizens First. The bald eagle is ca-cawing and it sounds awesome.)

Two days earlier, another end-of-year ceremony had taken place, just a short walk away on a field outside the law school library. It was Harvard’s first
commencement for black graduate students, and many of the speakers talked about a different, more personal kind of struggle, the struggle to be black at Harvard.

“We have endured the constant questioning of our legitimacy and our capacity, and yet here we are,” Duwain Pinder, a master’s degree candidate in business and public policy, told the cheering crowd of several hundred people in a keynote speech. (Actually no you haven't. You make a small group of idiots larger than it is and you feed the victim mentality.)

....

This spring, tiny Emory and Henry College in Virginia held its first “Inclusion and Diversity Year-End Ceremonies.” The University of Delaware joined a growing list of colleges with “Lavender” graduations for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students. At Columbia, students who were the first in their families to graduate from college attended the inaugural “First-Generation Graduation,” with inspirational speeches, a procession and the awarding of torch pins.

Some of the ceremonies have also taken on a sharper edge, with speakers adding an activist overlay to the more traditional sentiments about proud families and bright futures. (Go figure. I can hear the buzzwords now of empowerment, inclusion, and mean white people.)

After Columbia’s ceremony, Lizzette Delgadillo said she spoke about the pain of “impostor syndrome — feeling alone when it feels like everybody else on campus just knows what to do and you don’t,” and of how important it was to have the support of other first-generation students.

Ms. Delgadillo, who graduated with a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering, had lobbied for the event for three years, as a member of a group called the First-Generation Low-Income Partnership.

“The current political climate definitely pushed this initiative to come to fruition,” said Ms. Delgadillo, the daughter of Mexican immigrants living in Los Angeles. (The lack of critical thinking is amazing in Delgadillo. Biomedical engineering? There are fools in every major and field.)

Participants say the ceremonies are a way of celebrating their shared experience as a group, and not a rejection of official college graduations, which they also attend. Depending on one’s point of view, the ceremonies may also be reinforcing an image of the 21st-century campus as an incubator for identity politics.

“It’s not easy being a student, being a student anywhere, but especially at a place like Harvard,” Ward Connerly, president of the American Civil Rights Institute and a former University of California regent who campaigned against racial preference in admissions, said sympathetically.

But events like black commencements, he continued, serve only to “amplify” racial differences. “College is the place where we should be teaching and preaching the view that you’re an individual, and choose your associates to be based on other factors rather than skin color,” he said.

“Think about it,” Mr. Connerly added. “These kids went to Harvard, and they less than anyone in our society should worry about feeling welcome and finding comfort zones. They don’t need that.” (Whoa, whoa, whoa. Way too much woke here and common sense.)

The alternative ceremonies at Harvard had printed programs, and incorporated the pageantry, ritual and solemnity of traditional commencements, though without the diplomas, which were reserved for the official university commencement. (So sorta like a meeting of various registered campus groups geared towards race and sexual orientation at the end of the year. Yet places like Harvard are not allowing single sex organizations to exist found traditionally in Greek life. Because sexism and inclusion.)

A few hours after the new “Harvard University Black Commencement” for the graduate schools, including the prestigious law, divinity, business, government and medical schools, about 120 students attended the third annual “Latinx” commencement. In the cavernous basement of a science building, where an animal skeleton dangled overhead and Latin music played, students received stoles with the words “Clase Del 2017” woven into them, while siblings devoured chocolate cupcakes.

Black undergraduates held a separate event that night amid the polished pews and Greek columns of Memorial Church, Harvard’s spiritual center and the backdrop for Mr. Zuckerberg’s address.


While Mr. Zuckerberg’s speech was broadcast live and received thousands of complimentary comments on Facebook, the black ceremony was relatively small and more intimate, and seemed invisible to scores of classmates noshing on sliders and beer at a white tent nearby, part of the broader commencement week revelry.
The ceremony was open to all students, though virtually everyone who attended was black, and not all black students attended.

About 80 black graduates formed a procession to organ music, received kente-cloth stoles, listened to a classmate play Bach on cello and sang “Lift Every Voice and Sing.”


“For me, the black community is a home away from home,” Olivia Castor, a student speaker from Spring Valley, N.Y., who earned a bachelor’s degree in social studies and African-American studies, said exuberantly.

“It’s where I spent most of my time, where I found my closest friends and, more importantly, where I’ve learned the most important lessons during my time here,” she went on. “So thank you, thank you for being beautiful, brilliant and blackety-black-black.” (So does this mean whites have their White Ceremony then? Irish, French, Germany, Polish etc. descendants unite!)

Brandon M. Terry, the faculty speaker, joked that Harvard College’s black graduation had become more mainstream since he graduated in 2005.

“This setup already has us beat,” he said. “We were in one of the old Harvard buildings across campus. We had no air-conditioning, and some folding chairs on the stage.”

Professor Terry suggested that the mood was different as well.

“You began college just weeks after George Zimmerman was acquitted in the callous killing of Trayvon Martin,” Professor Terry, an assistant professor of African and African-American studies and social studies, said in his address. (Zimmerman v Martin wasn't about race, yet Terry naively believed the narrative that it was. I encourage people reading to check his bio. Harvard hired a person with no real world experience and, as an academic, a person who has contributed very little to his field; he almost has zero published papers yet he was offered a tenured position. No wonder the social sciences receive little respect.)

“You were teenagers, like Michael Brown when he was subjected to the Sophoclean indignity of being shot dead and left in the blazing sun. Your world was shaped in indelible ways by these deaths and others like them, and many of you courageously took to join one of the largest protest movements in decades to try to wrest some semblance of justice from these tragedies.”  (When a Harvard professor believes in false narratives and then makes up lies. I feel sorry for his students, especially the black students. And BLM is a disgrace. Anyone with a brain can see its prominence is based off of emotions and neither on facts nor sound reasoning.)

But like all the speakers, he spoke reverently of Harvard as an institution, saying: “The dramatic privileges that you have and will continue to benefit from in virtue of your association with this university are only worth the social cost if they are to benefit people worse off than you.”

Bhekinkosi Sibanda, a first-generation Harvard student from Zimbabwe, said he had been ambivalent at first about participating in the black graduation. (Don't succumb, Sibanda. You're better than that.)

“In an attempt at inclusivity, we don’t want to end up introducing exclusivity,” he said. “You don’t want to end up where this black commencement overshadows the entire commencement of the school. You don’t want to blow away the glory.” (No! You're not suppose to say that! /s)

Then Mr. Sibanda remembered how a professor had asked if he wanted to drop a class, when all he wanted was help. “It’s good to be able to take this time for solidarity and identity,” he said, “to celebrate what we’ve achieved.”
(This doesn't make sense. You grew up in Africa, possibly more disadvantaged than black Americans; honestly you don't have much in common besides being black. In fact, you have more in common with first-generation college grads regardless of their race and ethnicity.)

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/02/us/bl...rvard.html

Quote:Multicultural Affairs collaborates with student organizations, alumni groups, and other offices to organize multicultural graduation ceremonies that celebrate the accomplishments of students who have engaged in one or many of Columbia's diverse communities.
Unfortunately I don't have any "fun facts" about me unless being a practicing Catholic counts.

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#2
All of the university emphasis on “diversity” doesn’t seem to have prevented voluntarily resegregating everyone. The obsession with diversity was so ridiculous in the early 2000’s, when I was in college, that I almost found it unbearable. It’s so much worse now. I’m so glad I was done before this insanity.
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#3
This is such a joke. They pay 70k per year for this BS
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#4
Can you imagine Asian colleges in an Asian country sitting around discussing what they can do to make themselves less Asian..?
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#5
(07-27-2018, 08:41 AM)JEvolian18 Wrote: This is such a joke. They pay 70k per year for this BS

Some do; some don't. Places like Harvard have such a large endowment that many receive financial aid in forms of grants  or scholarships, severely cutting down the overall tuition cost. In the end it becomes affordable or at least manageable. Those who do pay out of pock at near or full price tend to come from families who can spare the cash. Of course this isn't the same for every elite university/college; it's mostly found in the Ivy League. Many top publics you're paying full price if you aren't a superstar or on an athletic scholarship.

source: https://college.harvard.edu/financial-aid
Unfortunately I don't have any "fun facts" about me unless being a practicing Catholic counts.

Trying to get better every day week.
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#6
(07-27-2018, 11:32 AM)BC Wrote: Can you imagine Asian colleges in an Asian country sitting around discussing what they can do to make themselves less Asian..?

Ha! From my observations and readings they view these types of stuff as kinda weird. I get the feeling that those who do attend the Asian ceremony at Harvard, probably at least half are foreign students seeing it as a get together, not something political.
Unfortunately I don't have any "fun facts" about me unless being a practicing Catholic counts.

Trying to get better every day week.
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#7
(07-27-2018, 07:53 AM)Credidi Propter Wrote: All of the university emphasis on “diversity” doesn’t seem to have prevented voluntarily resegregating everyone. The obsession with diversity was so ridiculous in the early 2000’s, when I was in college, that I almost found it unbearable. It’s so much worse now. I’m so glad I was done before this insanity.

That's the great irony to this. If a survey was given to ask those who participated in these "diversity" and "inclusion" stuff, asking how many people of other races and religions they have as friends compared to freshmen year , I bet there wouldn't be a stark difference when compared to students who don't participate in such events and/or groups. Their knowledge of other cultures wouldn't necessarily be anymore insightful than those who just choose to seek to understand another culture out of interest.
Unfortunately I don't have any "fun facts" about me unless being a practicing Catholic counts.

Trying to get better every day week.
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#8
It's always interesting how 'diversity' never includes diversity of thought or opinion. Most universities are mostly liberal, but see nothing wrong with that. If you had a Christian graduation or Republican graduation or conservative graduation, you'd never hear the end of how racist and exclusive it was.
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#9
They need to study their math at Harvard.


65 to 70% of the top performing high schoolers are white.

Whites make up 12% of entering freshmen at Harvard.



1.7% of a particular ethnic group makes up 67% of Harvard graduates.

Can you guess what ethnic group?

Watch:



What ethnic group does this situation anger the most?  

No, not whites.  Asians!
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#10
(07-28-2018, 11:55 AM)Sacred Heart lover Wrote: Watch:



What ethnic group does this situation anger the most?  

No, not whites.  Asians!

An interesting vid (only watched through the first guy interviewed) but I'm not sure about the math and the Jew thing.

I looked up the class of 2021 at Harvard and this is what I've found:

Matriculation: 1,687


International: 12.4% (209)

Ethnicity
 
African American, 14.6% (246.6)

Asian American, 22.2% (374.5)

Hispanic or Latino, 11.6% (195.6)

Native American or Pacific Islander, 2.5% (42)

This means non-white Americans makeup 50.9 % of the student body. Add in internationals and that leaves about 37% as white Americans. If there's a survey asking the incoming white Americans if they were Jewish I haven't found it, so I can't comment on whether the Jews are over represented at Harvard.

If we just use the statistics the link provides us we can extract that white Americans are a minority at Harvard where they are a majority in raw numbers in America, though in terms of race they are the largest accepted.

We also have to remember the incoming classes at Harvard are quite small; for 2021, admissions allotted 1, 687 freshmen seats (total undergrad population is around 22, 000).

Quote: 65 to 70% of the top performing high schoolers are white.

This is slightly meaningless because it gives no context. There many, many good private and public universities in the States and not all of the 75% apply to HYPS (Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Stanford) while many are mirror images of each other with no unique features (mostly every admitted person will have an ACT above a 32, be in the top 1-2% of the graduating class, and be a president of a club). Admittance at such places, as the priest in the movie Rudy states, "You never can tell with those admissions people. They're a funny bunch of squirrels." With that said it's intensively competitive and splitting hairs is often done, and out of many good students there might be one that's absolutely grand. A good student that's rejected at Harvard and Yale may be accepted at Dartmouth or UPenn. A student accepted at Yale may be rejected at Stanford and UChicago.

A valedictorian may want a school with big school spirit, sports, and Greek life, which many elite universities don't offer, so they may look at schools like Vanderbilt and Northwestern, or top publics like Michigan or Berkeley. Others might want more personalized attention from professors and a more intimate atmosphere with classmates and so they look at liberal arts schools (LAS) like Bowdoin or Carleton or Harvey Mudd.

What would be more interesting is breaking down the entrance exam scores (ACT/SAT) of each ethnicity and race and comparing that to past averages while seeing the average household income of each student (e.g., how many households are making less than 120K? How many are within each household?).
Unfortunately I don't have any "fun facts" about me unless being a practicing Catholic counts.

Trying to get better every day week.
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