Please help: Two mortal sin related questions.
#11
(07-31-2018, 09:45 AM)FultonFan Wrote: 1.  My grandfather is in palliative care.  He is 93 years old, and is going downhill pretty quick.  He has an advanced stomach cancer, and some clear dementia.  Last night we called the priest for the Last Rites.  He's very weak, and didn't confess any sins, and didn't take Holy Communion (his ability to swallow seems to be very weak at this point).  However, he DID manage to say to the priest that he'd like the Last Rites.  The Last Rites were administered, and it was rather beautiful.  He told my mother that he "felt at peace" now.  Anyway, this morning, he's doing very well physically.  He's even up in a chair watching TV. 

Here is some info on this sacrament from a good old, basic Catechism.  Note how one effect of the sacrament is physical strengthening and comfort (it seemed that happened in your grandfather's case) and that it should be given even when there is still hope of recovery.  

Quote:The Sacrament of Extreme Unction

1 Q. What is Extreme Unction?
A. Extreme Unction is a sacrament instituted for the spiritual as well as for the temporal comfort of the sick in danger of death.

2 Q. What are the effects of Extreme Unction?
A. The sacrament of Extreme Unction produces the following effects: (1) It increases sanctifying grace; (2) It remits venial sins, and also mortal sins which the sick person, if contrite, is unable to confess; (3) It takes away weakness and sloth which remain even After pardon has been obtained; (4) It gives strength to bear illness patiently, to withstand temptation and to die holily; (5) It aids in restoring us to health of body if it is for the good of the soul.

3 Q. When should Extreme Unction be received?
A. Extreme Unction should be received when the illness is dangerous, and after the sick person has received, if possible, the sacraments of Penance and the Blessed Eucharist; it is even well to receive it while he has the use of his senses, and has still some hope of recovery.

4 Q. Why is it well to receive Extreme Unction when the sick person has still the use of his senses, and has still some hope of recovery?
A. It is well to receive Extreme Unction while the sick person retains the use of his senses, and while there remains some hope of his recovery because: (1) He thus receives it with better dispositions, and is hence able to derive greater fruit from it; (2) This sacrament restores health of body (should it be for the good of the soul) by assisting the powers of nature; and hence it should not be deferred until recovery is despaired of.


http://www.ewtn.com/library/catechsm/piusxcat.htm
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#12
(07-31-2018, 10:54 AM)SaintSebastian Wrote:
(07-31-2018, 09:45 AM)FultonFan Wrote: 1.  My grandfather is in palliative care.  He is 93 years old, and is going downhill pretty quick.  He has an advanced stomach cancer, and some clear dementia.  Last night we called the priest for the Last Rites.  He's very weak, and didn't confess any sins, and didn't take Holy Communion (his ability to swallow seems to be very weak at this point).  However, he DID manage to say to the priest that he'd like the Last Rites.  The Last Rites were administered, and it was rather beautiful.  He told my mother that he "felt at peace" now.  Anyway, this morning, he's doing very well physically.  He's even up in a chair watching TV. 

Here is some info on this sacrament from a good old, basic Catechism.  Note how one effect of the sacrament is physical strengthening and comfort (it seemed that happened in your grandfather's case) and that it should be given even when there is still hope of recovery.  

Quote:The Sacrament of Extreme Unction

1 Q. What is Extreme Unction?
A. Extreme Unction is a sacrament instituted for the spiritual as well as for the temporal comfort of the sick in danger of death.

2 Q. What are the effects of Extreme Unction?
A. The sacrament of Extreme Unction produces the following effects: (1) It increases sanctifying grace; (2) It remits venial sins, and also mortal sins which the sick person, if contrite, is unable to confess; (3) It takes away weakness and sloth which remain even After pardon has been obtained; (4) It gives strength to bear illness patiently, to withstand temptation and to die holily; (5) It aids in restoring us to health of body if it is for the good of the soul.

3 Q. When should Extreme Unction be received?
A. Extreme Unction should be received when the illness is dangerous, and after the sick person has received, if possible, the sacraments of Penance and the Blessed Eucharist; it is even well to receive it while he has the use of his senses, and has still some hope of recovery.

4 Q. Why is it well to receive Extreme Unction when the sick person has still the use of his senses, and has still some hope of recovery?
A. It is well to receive Extreme Unction while the sick person retains the use of his senses, and while there remains some hope of his recovery because: (1) He thus receives it with better dispositions, and is hence able to derive greater fruit from it; (2) This sacrament restores health of body (should it be for the good of the soul) by assisting the powers of nature; and hence it should not be deferred until recovery is despaired of.


http://www.ewtn.com/library/catechsm/piusxcat.htm

Amazingly, he's actually after drinking about 4 cups of Pepsi.  This is after days and days of him being unable to drink even a drop. 

One other thing I should add:  Pop's religious background is a bit obscure.  I think he was baptized Anglican, and then converted to Catholicism when he married my grandmother.  When she died, he attended an Anglican Church again for a bit, but hasn't attended ANY Church for the past few years. 

I assume the Sacrament would still be efficacious?
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#13
FultonFan Wrote:2. This next question may be kind of silly, but I want to ask anyway. I have an app. on my phone to order Tim Hortons coffees in advance, so that they're ready for you when you arrive. Anyway, there's a feature on your phone that makes me press "I'm not driving" before I can use it. I took out the phone while driving, pressed the button, and then passed it to my wife to make the order. Is this a mortal sin? I technically lied to my phone, and I guess for a brief moment I was a distracted driver. Does this sound like something needing confession?

That depends on the circumstances. If you consciously and actively put someone's life at risk by doing so, and upon death they would go to hell, then yes, it was a mortal sin. Since we cannot know the full circumstances, I suggest you confess it.
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#14
(07-31-2018, 12:08 PM)ServusDei Wrote:
FultonFan Wrote:2.  This next question may be kind of silly, but I want to ask anyway.  I have an app. on my phone to order Tim Hortons coffees in advance, so that they're ready for you when you arrive.  Anyway, there's a feature on your phone that makes me press "I'm not driving" before I can use it.  I took out the phone while driving, pressed the button, and then passed it to my wife to make the order.  Is this a mortal sin?  I technically lied to my phone, and I guess for a brief moment I was a distracted driver.  Does this sound like something needing confession?

That depends on the circumstances. If you consciously and actively put someone's life at risk by doing so, and upon death they would go to hell, then yes, it was a mortal sin. Since we cannot know the full circumstances, I suggest you confess it.

I'm not so sure I put anyone's life at risk.  It's not as if I wasn't controlling the vehicle.  I just unlocked the phone's lock screen so my wife could use it.
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#15
FultonFan Wrote:I'm not so sure I put anyone's life at risk. It's not as if I wasn't controlling the vehicle. I just unlocked the phone's lock screen so my wife could use it.

Ok, that doesn't sound too terrible.
:monstrance:Deo Gratias et Ave Maria! :monstrance:
Pray the Rosary

A Dieu mon ame,
Mon arme au roi,
Mon Coeur a la dame,
Mon honneur a moi!
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#16
(07-31-2018, 10:11 AM)Melkite Wrote: It is, in my opinion, an odd practice that the Latin tradition reserves holy unction to near death.

We don't reserve Extreme Unction for "near death" but the validity of the Sacrament requires that there be a "danger of death". Whenever there is a new danger of death we can anoint again.

Thus, someone who is simple aged can receive Extreme Unction for this. A woman just diagnosed with a relatively serious cancer can be anointed (since serious forms of cancer can carry a danger of death). If the woman has a metastasis which causes other more acute dangers (e.g. a new tumor in the brain), she could be anointed again.

If it is the same danger, but just a development of the conditions, the person cannot be anointed again.

It must be done for a danger of death which is internal to the person. A soldier going into war cannot be anointed, but if shot, he could be.

In short, the ritual does not reserve it for right before death, but there must be some present internal cause of a danger of death in order to give it. That danger can be fairly remote, or quite near, but the ritual is clear as well that it is best done when a disease first appears, to help strengthen the soul to fight and perhaps to then cause a bodily healing.

That is in keeping with St. James' admonition in his Epistle (5.14-15) : "Is any man sick among you? Let him bring in the priests of the church, and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord. And the prayer of faith shall save the sick man: and the Lord shall raise him up: and if he be in sins, they shall be forgiven him."

There has to be a true sickness and, clearly this has to be such that it's not just an ordinary cold, thus tradition has said this is reserved for a serious illness, such that there is at least some danger of death. This also tells us too that the effect is principally to forgive sins, but also possibly heal the sick man.
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#17
(07-31-2018, 11:06 AM)FultonFan Wrote: Amazingly, he's actually after drinking about 4 cups of Pepsi.  This is after days and days of him being unable to drink even a drop. 

One other thing I should add:  Pop's religious background is a bit obscure.  I think he was baptized Anglican, and then converted to Catholicism when he married my grandmother.  When she died, he attended an Anglican Church again for a bit, but hasn't attended ANY Church for the past few years. 

I assume the Sacrament would still be efficacious?

If he was legitimately unable to Confess (and it sounds like he was), the Sacrament would be efficacious in forgiving even mortal sins, so long as he was contrite.

This is one reason that we do offer the Sacrament when people are dying, since it can forgive sins.

If he has the chance to make a confession, he must mention any mortal sins he has not yet mentioned in Sacramental Confession, just like what happens when we forget a sin in confession. We have to mention it in a future confession by the commandment of the Church. When doing so, he would mention that he's received Extreme Unction and could not confess beforehand and then list the mortal sins only. The priest will treat these just as he does legitimately forgotten mortal sins.

If he has dementia, he would only do so, or be allowed to confess when he was certainly lucid.
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#18
(07-31-2018, 10:05 AM)Jeeter Wrote:   Mostly, I'm just a tad envious that I can't get Tim Horton's down here. :D

An envy I share. Oh, for a Timmy's double double and a maple glazed doughnut! Just give my Timmy's and nobody gets hurt!

Seriously, Jeeter, you know that you can order the coffee online? Unfortunately they don't sell the addictive sugar syrup. :LOL:
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#19
One thing nobody mentioned was that it was very likely that the your grandfather's reception of the sacrament may have had some part in his getting better. This has happened on more than one occasion to people in my family.
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#20
(08-01-2018, 12:07 AM)Poche Wrote: One thing nobody mentioned was that it was very likely that the your grandfather's reception of the sacrament may have had some part in his getting better. This has happened on more than one occasion to people in my family.

Poche, do you ever bother to read a thread before commenting? Saint Sebastian specifically said,

Quote:Note how one effect of the sacrament is physical strengthening and comfort (it seemed that happened in your grandfather's case) and that it should be given even when there is still hope of recovery.  

This is not the first time that you have made a point that was made just a few posts before.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
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My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


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