The Intellect of Christ
#1
I was looking through my Baltimore Catechism today and started meditating. I'm amazed after really thinking about the truth that Christ has perfect knowledge of all things it. Of course it's a no brainer, he is God, but the thing that I was impressed by was the fact how complicated everything in the entire world is and he gave such simple message when he came to Earth 2000 years ago. Love God and love your neighbor. Divine simplicity, I love it.
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#2
God is perfectly simple and perfectly complex. It's a mystery of our Faith. Even St. Augustine, whose mind reached lofty heights, was not able to comprehend God in His Entirety.
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A Dieu mon ame,
Mon arme au roi,
Mon Coeur a la dame,
Mon honneur a moi!
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#3
(07-31-2018, 05:55 PM)Patmappas28 Wrote: I was looking through my Baltimore Catechism today and started meditating. I'm amazed after really thinking about the truth that Christ has perfect knowledge of all things it. Of course it's a no brainer, he is God, but the thing that I was impressed by was the fact how complicated everything in the entire world is and he gave such simple message when he came to Earth 2000 years ago. Love God and love your neighbor. Divine simplicity, I love it.

Be careful to apply the correct definition of “simple” here. It can mean “plain,” or “without complication,” but that’s not what the Church means when it talks about Divine Simplicity.  

Here is an explanation from the Modern Catholic Dictionary:

SIMPLICITY OF GOD. The absence of any composition or divisibility in God. According to the Fourth Lateran and First Vatican Councils, God is an "absolutely simple substance or nature" (Denzinger 800). His simplicity is absolute. In him there is no composition of any kind, of substance and accidents, of essence and existence, of nature and person, of power and activity, of genus and specific difference. The theological basis of divine simplicity is that God is pure actuality, which is incompatible with any kind of composition.
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#4
The whole of question 9-12 of the Tertia Pars of the Summa Theologica are occupied with the question of Christ's knowledge. It's a pretty impressive study of Christ.

Christ had four types of knowledge, three of which relate to Christ as man.

  1. Divine knowledge, by which he knew everything as God does (Comprehension of everything in its very nature and seen all simultaneously)
  2. The Beatific Vision, by which in his human nature he contemplated God Himself, and saw everything else in God simultaneously, and this from his conception.
  3. An infused knowledge which perfected His possible Intellect and He knew everything that was possible to know in a human way, and this from his conception.
  4. An acquired knowledge which perfected His active Intellect and gave particular knowledge and experience of things in a human way, this growing as He did.
This latter one is why, for instance, the Gospel can say that "Jesus proficiebat sapientia, et ætate, et gratia apud Deum et homines." (Lk 2.52). As God Jesus could not grow in wisdom, nor could he do so through the Beatific Vision or Infused Knowledge, but he gained experiences of things and thus a kind of knowledge and wisdom, even if He knew the things already by another means.
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#5
There were times in the Gospel were it appeared He didn't know things, as with the issue of blood, when He asked,  'Who touched me?' Or with His own mother and Father, 'Did you not know that I had to be in my Father's house?' I always wondered about that.
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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#6
(07-31-2018, 08:28 PM)Jacafamala Wrote: There were times in the Gospel were it appeared He didn't know things, as with the issue of blood, when He asked,  'Who touched me?' Or with His own mother and Father, 'Did you not know that I had to be in my Father's house?' I always wondered about that.

I always understood those to be tests and reminders, respectively. He knew who touched him, but He was testing their faith. Likewise, I’ve always read His comment to Mary and Joseph as a reminder that He was here for a purpose.
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God's love is manifest in the landscape as in a face.  - John Muir

I want creation to penetrate you with so much admiration that wherever you go, the least plant may bring you clear remembrance of the Creator.  A single plant, a blade of grass, or one speck of dust is sufficient to occupy all your intelligence in beholding the art with which it has been made  - Saint Basil

Heaven is under our feet, as well as over our heads. - Thoreau, Walden
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#7
(07-31-2018, 09:12 PM)Jeeter Wrote:
(07-31-2018, 08:28 PM)Jacafamala Wrote: There were times in the Gospel were it appeared He didn't know things, as with the issue of blood, when He asked,  'Who touched me?' Or with His own mother and Father, 'Did you not know that I had to be in my Father's house?' I always wondered about that.

I always understood those to be tests and reminders, respectively. He knew who touched him, but He was testing their faith. Likewise, I’ve always read His comment to Mary and Joseph as a reminder that He was here for a purpose.

That is a possibility. Rather than expressing a lack of knowledge, he was simply asking the person to identify themselves. However, it is just as much possible that he was expressing the lack of actual knowledge. While he would have known something by infused knowledge, the Beatific Vision, or Divine Knowledge, he was expressing his lack of experiential knowledge of the happening before, and his lack of who touched him from this perspective.

He was ignorant in one way, and not in another, and he was expressing this.

It is similar to crying aloud on the Cross, "My God, My God, Why hast thou abandoned me?" when He still had the Beatific Vision in the higher part of his soul and even in His human intellect, saw God as He is in Himself. In one way He was abandoned by God, but in another He was as close as He ever had been, and this is without recourse to His Divine Nature.
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#8
God asks similar questions all throughout the bible. For example in Genesis he asked Adam where he was, he asked Cain what became of Abel etc.

He asked them not because he was lacking in knowledge but for the other persons sake.
Surréxit Dóminus vere, Alleluia!
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