TEA
#11
ICED TEA FOREVER!!!
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#12
Montreal_Marisa Wrote:I'm not a big tea drinker, but do enjoy it hot or cold depending on the weather outside.  Oh, and always decaf!  That probably cancels my vote out altogether right?  [Image: jestera.gif]

I drink decaf too! I don't like how caffeine affects my mind and energy level.

my Mother my Confidence,
Corinne
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#13
Are we really having this discussion?!?! Peter Funt must be here somewhere....[Image: common037.gif]
 
 
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#14
What a coincidence. I'm drinking tea right now- hot and strong as usual.

I didn't even know there was such a thing as iced tea.:eek:
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#15
Ah, Pinoy, these poor, poor Americans,  whatever shall we do with them? [Image: laff.gif]
 
I am willing to concede that the "Iced tea" may be palatable on certain rare occasions. However, I do not believe it should be falsely dignified with the name of "Tea." It is, in reality, a concoction quite different. "Tea-flavored ice-water," perhaps?
 
No, true Tea is hot, almost to boiling, on occasion. It is prepared by mixing a blend of fine teas together (though I admit that established types, such as Prince of Wales, Darjeeling, and Earl Grey are equally acceptable) and putting said tea into a tea-ball. The ball is then submerged into the mug of heated water, and allowed to steep for between a minute and five. When steeping is complete, cold cream and sugar are added, and tea is consumed.
 
Alternatively, the cold cream may be poured into an empty mug, and hot tea poured over this, if the tea is made in a teapot on the stove, rather than one mugful at a time. I recommend the latter procedure, as one seldom drinks only one cup of tea.
 
In addition, it might be wise to add that a tea-ball is not strictly necessary, though desirable. One could conceivably produce the tea like cocoa, and pour it directly into the water. I've not done this. OR, in a rush, it is possible to use one of the new-fangled "tea bags" which you see in stores sometimes.
 
Jennifer, who is Peter Funt? Also, you didn't express your tea preference!!![Image: smile.gif]
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#16
Quote:No, true Tea is hot, almost to boiling, on occasion. It is prepared by mixing a blend of fine teas together (though I admit that established types, such as Prince of Wales, Darjeeling, and Earl Grey are equally acceptable) and putting said tea into a tea-ball. The ball is then submerged into the mug of heated water, and allowed to steep for between a minute and five. When steeping is complete, cold cream and sugar are added, and tea is consumed.

This is civilisation, to be sure. However, out in the bush, the grand old tradition of black billy tea is appropriate. Boil water in the billy (all purpose cooking-can), pour in a ton of tea, beat billy with a stick, and leave to stand for ten minutes.

I did a google search on black billy tea, and found this from the memoirs of an NZ musician:

Quote:I’ll never forget the sweet black billy tea taken near the top of a hill as the sun came up. My father would put a stick across the top of the billy so that the aromatic smoke from the manuka fire would be drawn into the brew.
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#17
Quote: Jennifer, who is Peter Funt? Also, you didn't express your tea preference!!![Image: smile.gif]
 
Peter Funt is the host of "Candid Camera", and the only time I drink tea is when I am precariously close to death, [Image: gost.gif] and it can only be hot lemon tea with honey.
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#18
JLeigh Wrote:

Quote: Jennifer, who is Peter Funt? Also, you didn't express your tea preference!!![Image: smile.gif]

Peter Funt is the host of "Candid Camera", and the only time I drink tea is when I am precariously close to death, [Image: gost.gif] and it can only be hot lemon tea with honey.


I thought his name was Alan Funt?  [Image: shrug.gif]
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#19
I don't like the caffinated stuff either, not good for my nerves!!
Have any of you tried a french press?  Got one for Christmas.   Its great for loose tea!!  Don't know how we got along without it.    Its a small glass pitcher with a hand press inside.  You put in the loose tea(or coffee grounds), pour in the hot water, put the press inside the pitcher and press!! up and down, up and down.  Kids fight over who gets to do this.   Let sit for 5 or 10 minutes. Give it a few more presses.  When ready to drink press all the loose tea ( or grounds) down to the bottom and ya have clear tea to drink!! 
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#20
Quote:I am willing to concede that the "Iced tea" may be palatable on certain rare occasions. However, I do not believe it should be falsely dignified with the name of "Tea." It is, in reality, a concoction quite different. "Tea-flavored ice-water," perhaps?

If you are to give in on this point, I must make a note about "teas."  I would not admit that Lipton is really tea.  It's just cheap and mass-produced manufactured plants in paper.

Real tea is the no-name Chinese stuff at the market.  =P

Pinoy Monk
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