TEA
#41
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I just smoked a pipe a few minutes ago, and another will follow my supper.  Chimay is indeed the nectar of Heaven, but the bit about being a closet Brit is really uncalled for.  En guard, you Scandinavian rogue! [Image: duel.gif]
 
Mate, pronounced mah-tay, is a South American tea, and is very good (both in the taste and the positive effects).  Coffee, as good as some tastes, is not actually very good for the body, nor for the mind.
 
Port happens to be bloody good, Varus.  Too good, maybe.  Incidentally, if you have any on hand, I would love a glass.
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[Image: duel.gif]I pick up the glove and join the duel. Might Thou be of Irish descendancy, Sir? In that case, you have my sympathy.
 
As much as I adore a glass of fine port, I believe the word bloody to be  charachteristic of the British and, hence, I  stand by my words pertaining to the closet.
However, in the midst of this duel, I will gladly offer Thou a glass of the best port during the pause. En chanté!
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#42
I picked up the usage of bloody from my best friend, who is an Aussie (hardly a lover of the English).  I do not use it often, as I am not actually Aussie.  I am mostly Irish, the rest being Swedish (and maybe a smidge of this or that).
 
Thanks for the drink, and there really is no need to address me as Thou; thou, with the lower case 't' will do just fine.
 
 
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#43
Let's watch our language... "b!**dy" used to be one of my most oft-used expletives, probably since it carries few negative connotation in America, but A) it can be highly offensive to British Empire folks, and B) I have read that the reason it is so offensive is because it refers to the sacred blood of Christ, shed for our sins on Calvary. Consequently, as Catholics and as polite gentlemen I don't think we should use it.
 
(Sorry boys, they tell me I'm a moderator, so I better say things like that!)
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#44
Sorry, the T came due to habitual use.[Image: doh.gif]
 
Irish-Swedish? Interesting!
When I was in London a week ago, an Irish lady sitting by my table in the church hall after Mass asked me : Where do you come from, Mick?
-When I told her that I was not Irish, she refused to believe it at first. She said she was never mistaken in recognizing Irishmen based on looks.
I replied that it was not that much mistaken, since we were masters on the island for quite a while and left an ethnic impact very visible today.
 
Do you know where in Sweden your ancestors came from? 
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#45
From Word-Detective:
 
The inexplicable expletive. Dear Word Detective: I am wondering about the English expletive "bloody." I understand it's derived from "By Our Lady" Is this true? -- Mizoe, via the Internet. Almost certainly not. No one knows for sure where "bloody" came from, and although many theories have been proposed over the past few hundred years, no solid evidence has ever emerged to settle the question. That mystery about the origin of the word, however, doesn't stop the story of "bloody" from being one of the stranger word tales around. To Americans, "bloody" means next to nothing -- it's simply a word we hear in British movies and vaguely recognize as some sort of intensifier ("It's this bloody heat that's driving the men mad, Colonel."). To a Briton, however, "bloody" is a heavy-duty expletive, one that even in these liberal times could probably not be used in polite society without shocking at least a few of those present. There's really no equivalent to "bloody" in American English, but if there were I'd probably not be able to print it in this column. Even today, British newspapers usually will only print "bloody" if it is contained safely within a direct quotation. Among the working class of Britain, however, "bloody" is as popular as our familiar four-letter expletives are on American loading docks (or in certain Oval Offices). "Bloody" is even more popular Down Under, where it is known as "The Great Australian Adjective." What is truly odd about upper-class Britons' "bloody" squeamishness is that until about 1750, "bloody" was considered a acceptable if somewhat unpleasant word, often used as an intensifier in everyday conversation. The emergence of violent gangs of aristocratic thugs known as "bloods" (probably from "blood thirsty") in the 18th century may have been the impetus for the public banishment of "bloody" from polite speech, but in any case the exile lasted for more than 200 years and is only now easing. All of which proves that the history of words is every bit as irrational as the people who use them.
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#46
JLeigh,
 
Thank you! I knew it!
 
Gladius,
I rest my case. [Image: biggrin.gif]
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#47
Varus Wrote:Gladius,
I rest my case. [Image: biggrin.gif]
Based on what?  The bit from JLeigh exonerates me of your trumped up charge, if it does anything. 
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#48
Green Tea - Hot only
 
All others teas - I reserve my right to have it any way i darn well please.
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#49
Just had a cup of Green Tea, whilst I smoked my pipe on a beautiful night here in NE FL.  Ah!
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#50
My good man,
 
"it's simply a word we hear in British movies and vaguely recognize as some sort of intensifier ("It's this bloody heat that's driving the men mad, Colonel."). "
 
Aha! You are just trying to avoid the issue, because you know I've penetrated and exposed your conspiratory masquearade, trying to hide the britishness!
Everybody knows that "bloody" is British. Try saying "bloody"  to a secret agent. He would report back that he had met a Brit in disguise.
 
En avant, M´sieur!   Le Bastille!
 
 
gladius_veritatis Wrote:
Varus Wrote:Gladius,
I rest my case. [Image: biggrin.gif]
Based on what?  The bit from JLeigh exonerates me of your trumped up charge, if it does anything. 
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