Loud
#1
A neighbor who I have had "issues" with has been blasting his music for the last +2 hours and it's driving me crazy. It's like I can't really even live in my own house and one family has moved already partly because of the noise these people generate.

Basically the guy is a jackass and does what he wants with no care for anyone else around him. Just want him to move out. He also has a very violent temper.

Please pray for him that he will stop blasting his music or move out eventually.


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"The problem with you sir, is that your intelligence enables you to evaluate people critically and when you evaluate people critically, you bring danger upon yourself."   -Lao Tzu

"And God said, “Let the earth bring forth living creatures according to their kinds: [...] creeping things [...] of the earth according to their kinds.” And it was so." -Genesis 1:24 (RSV:CE)

"And what do we say to the god of death?" "...not today."


Vive les Catholiques de la Vendée!
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#2
Call the police.  Noise disturbance calls aren't that uncommon, and most communities have ordinances regarding noise.
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#3
I've actually called the police on him a few times in the past; only for him to come over, start screaming outside our front door, and threatening me (not with violence or intention to harm me, at least) that he would call the city on me.

When I told him I just wanted him to stop blasting his music, he asked me "why do you want quiet?" As if, not listening to his rap music (with a handicapped child living in his house, mind you) for the neighbors to hear is a bad thing. I certainly don't want to listen to it, but at the same time calling the cops would lead to nothing but more threats placed against me specifically.

The HOA doesn't seem to care that he blasts his music.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
"The problem with you sir, is that your intelligence enables you to evaluate people critically and when you evaluate people critically, you bring danger upon yourself."   -Lao Tzu

"And God said, “Let the earth bring forth living creatures according to their kinds: [...] creeping things [...] of the earth according to their kinds.” And it was so." -Genesis 1:24 (RSV:CE)

"And what do we say to the god of death?" "...not today."


Vive les Catholiques de la Vendée!
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#4
Well, you either tolerate it, call the cops, or move. You could also attempt to blast louder music, music that you may like, at times that he may want quiet.  Then he may have a sense of his own error... Even better is to get a good set of earplugs for yourself and blast some nauseating Protestant youth mass church hymns. I know it’s awful, but offer it as an act of penance.
"Why does your teacher eat with tax collectors and sinners?" On hearing this, Jesus said, "It is not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick. But go and learn what this means: 'I desire mercy, not sacrifice.' For I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners."  Matthew 9:10-14
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#5
(08-11-2018, 03:14 PM)Sequentia Wrote: I've actually called the police on him a few times in the past; only for him to come over, start screaming outside our front door, and threatening me (not with violence or intention to harm me, at least) that he would call the city on me.

If you have a cell phone video camera or any other way of recording video, record him when he does this.  Then you can turn that into the cops.  You probably need to be really pushy and persevering with the police department to get them to care about this.  But if he acts like that towards you, especially on your property, you can get him into real trouble and maybe he will take your requests for quiet more seriously.  You can also hire a mediator to sort out a compromise between the two of you.  If there are other neighbors who are really bothered, you should get them in on it so it doesn't look like a solely personal matter.
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#6
Does your municipality have a noise ordinance?
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#7
OP, I have a problem also with this, perhaps not to the level you have, but in my previous residence it was probably as bad as your current situation, and it was a clear ordinance violation because it was way after 10 p.m.  (Usually started about 1:00 a.m., lasted until 6 a.m.)  It gets even more difficult if you live in a city or portion of a city with higher than average crime, because the police will not prioritize noise complaints.

However, in my previous case, what happened is that I started calling each time it happened, consistently, and exactly because the police had other priorities and were annoyed to have to constantly include this call, they "lost it" at one point, became very angry, and handed a citation to the residents, who objected (of course).  I saw the whole encounter.  The citation was a Notice to Appear in court.  Shortly thereafter, the music stopped and I never had a problem with it again.  I believe that the tenants were asked to leave by the landlord.  (See below.)

If there is no recourse to such enforceable ordinances, what I would do is go to the county Public Records and locate the contact information of the owner of the house/apartment building.  Write a letter detailing the obnoxiousness and public nuisance of said person, making sure first that you have kept records.  (When I call the local police about obnoxiously loud and late music, I hold my phone right next to the music so that the dispatchers can hear the volume of it.)  Keep written and audio records, informing the owner that you have those records.

If the owner does not respond to your letter, or does respond but blows you off with "I take no responsibility and I have no control," you reply with, Yes, you do have control because this is your tenant, and he is violating the law, including the right of neighbors to normal peace and quiet.  If he still stalls, go down to the police station with all of your records and ask the police what civil recourse there is, given that no one seems willing to enforce criminal violations.  The District Attorney's office should also be able to direct you to avenues, such as if there is a monetary amount of damages you can claim in Small Claims Court (as a deterrent/punishment only; obviously this is not about a money loss).  If there is a low-fee civil lawsuit option, I would pursue it, and include any loss of wages required for you to skip your job that day to appear in court.
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#8
I will add that some of us work from home, including at non-standard hours, because that involves editing online, Skyping or Zooming clients across the globe, joining a professional meeting within the time frame of global headquarters, etc.  This is not the same as living in a business zone.  Instead, this is the reality of operating a home office in one's residence, which is considered a legitimate activity by the IRS.  

For example, some noise ordinances are tied to local curfews.  Others are established arbitrarily but to conform with the majority of residential sleeping hours.  I have definitely had situations in the last few years where I had a nighttime Skype appointment with someone which I had to stop or cancel entirely because it was impossible to hear the other person.  Those were financial losses.  Those are always recoverable in Small Claims and other low-fee civil courts.
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