Exploring Byzantine spirituality
#1
Does anyone here have any ideas how I can begin to explore Byzantine Catholic spirituality or that of a similar rite. I've long had an interest but I'm much too "Latinate" to actually get into it. I find it difficult and not nearly as "neat" and as I would like.

I know most of you will say that the best way is to attend the liturgy but currently that's not an option as all of the churches around here are Roman Catholic, mostly NO.

I also would rather not get book suggestions right now as I am currently broker than a tooth fairy in a house full of meth addicts and have FAR too many books as it is.

Any other suggestions are appreciated.
Surréxit Dóminus vere, Alleluia!
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#2
Since most of the prayers, etc. are common to both Eastern Catholicism and Orthodoxy, there are lots of sites with Orthodox prayers. If you'd like, I could email the ones I have book marked if you'd like. Just PM me your email addy.

However, I would suggest starting with the Akathist Hymn to the Most Holy Theotokos. It is amazing and carries the same indulgences as recitation of the Rosary.
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#3
(08-17-2018, 02:58 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: Since most of the prayers, etc. are common to both Eastern Catholicism and Orthodoxy, there are lots of sites with Orthodox prayers. If you'd like, I could email the ones I have book marked if you'd like. Just PM me your email addy.

However, I would suggest starting with the Akathist Hymn to the Most Holy Theotokos. It is amazing and carries the same indulgences as recitation of the Rosary.

Thank you Jovan. I've prayed the akathist before but I've never really gotten into it. Will try.
Surréxit Dóminus vere, Alleluia!
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#4
(08-17-2018, 03:08 AM)Dominicus Wrote:
(08-17-2018, 02:58 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: Since most of the prayers, etc. are common to both Eastern Catholicism and Orthodoxy, there are lots of sites with Orthodox prayers. If you'd like, I could email the ones I have book marked if you'd like. Just PM me your email addy.

However, I would suggest starting with the Akathist Hymn to the Most Holy Theotokos. It is amazing and carries the same indulgences as recitation of the Rosary.

Thank you Jovan. I've prayed the akathist before but I've never really gotten into it. Will try.
Peace.....yes, this is something I would like too so I will do it and thankyou!  angeltime :heart:
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#5
(08-17-2018, 02:58 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: Since most of the prayers, etc. are common to both Eastern Catholicism and Orthodoxy, there are lots of sites with Orthodox prayers. If you'd like, I could email the ones I have book marked if you'd like. Just PM me your email addy.

However, I would suggest starting with the Akathist Hymn to the Most Holy Theotokos. It is amazing and carries the same indulgences as recitation of the Rosary.

Have you explored the Jesus Prayer? There are a lot of resources online. Many consider it to be the foundation of EAstern spiritual practice
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#6
Are there any Orthodox churches near you?  You could always go for vespers on a Saturday evening.  In some ways, I prefer vespers over the liturgy itself.  I think it's due to the melancholy in me, but there is just something about the prayers and chant in a darkened church only lit by candles that really makes me feel closer to God.

You could also watch the liturgy on youtube.  It could be a good way to quickly see the differences between Greco-Arabic style chanting and prayers, and the various Slavic forms.  It kind of shows you where the heart of each people is, where they're praying from, if that makes sense.
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#7
(08-17-2018, 09:00 AM)Melkite Wrote: Are there any Orthodox churches near you?  You could always go for vespers on a Saturday evening.  In some ways, I prefer vespers over the liturgy itself.  I think it's due to the melancholy in me, but there is just something about the prayers and chant in a darkened church only lit by candles that really makes me feel closer to God.

You could also watch the liturgy on youtube.  It could be a good way to quickly see the differences between Greco-Arabic style chanting and prayers, and the various Slavic forms.  It kind of shows you where the heart of each people is, where they're praying from, if that makes sense.
Peace.....It seems that Vespers and Tridentine Mass draw more contemplative people.  There are others who just dont realize they have a contemplative side to their nature, because we live in such a noisy world.  God bless, angeltime :heart:
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#8
(08-17-2018, 03:08 AM)Dominicus Wrote:
(08-17-2018, 02:58 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: Since most of the prayers, etc. are common to both Eastern Catholicism and Orthodoxy, there are lots of sites with Orthodox prayers. If you'd like, I could email the ones I have book marked if you'd like. Just PM me your email addy.

However, I would suggest starting with the Akathist Hymn to the Most Holy Theotokos. It is amazing and carries the same indulgences as recitation of the Rosary.

Thank you Jovan. I've prayed the akathist before but I've never really gotten into it. Will try.

Try singing it. The Pochaiv melody for the refrains is a really simple melody that repeats every four lines. It really "lands" a bit more when it's sung. It's probably mostly due to familiarity, but I think the Slavic melodies are much easier than the Greco-Arab ones. The Byzantine Catholic text and music of the service can be found here. It is a full version of the service. The only difference from more common usage is that very often kontakion 13 is sung three times, and then ikos 1 and kontakion one are repeated before the ending prayers. Russians usually insert psalm 50 and the Creed before the akathist itself. If you look for a Russian or Ukrainian video version online, the ikos melodies will be the same, but the kontakion melody will differ.
O unashamed intercessor of Christians, ever loyal advocate before the Creator, do not disregard the prayerful voice of sinners but in your goodness hasten to assist us who trustfully cry out to you: Intercede always, O Mother of God, in behalf of those who honor you!
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#9
(08-17-2018, 09:22 AM)angeltime Wrote: Peace.....It seems that Vespers and Tridentine Mass draw more contemplative people.  There are others who just dont realize they have a contemplative side to their nature, because we live in such a noisy world.  God bless, angeltime :heart:

I could see that being true about the low mass...not so much with a high mass.  But then again, I've only gone to a handful in my lifetime.
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#10
(08-17-2018, 11:12 AM)Melkite Wrote:
(08-17-2018, 09:22 AM)angeltime Wrote: Peace.....It seems that Vespers and Tridentine Mass draw more contemplative people.  There are others who just dont realize they have a contemplative side to their nature, because we live in such a noisy world.  God bless, angeltime :heart:

I could see that being true about the low mass...not so much with a high mass.  But then again, I've only gone to a handful in my lifetime.

It can be true for the high Mass as well. Many people seem to think they always have to be doing something or saying something at Mass. The rubrics just direct the server to say the responses, and at least most of the people’s postures and gestures are customs, not rubrics.

Personally, I prefer a low Mass. so often, at high Masses, the musicians are distracting to me.
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