The First Pope After Peter.....
#1
Peace.....My understanding is that Peter was the first Bishop of Rome however he didn't live in Rome but in other areas.  So, who was the next Bishop after him and how did he become called POPE?  Did he appoint himself or was there some indication by Peter that he appointed or mentioned someone to be next after him?  Tks and God bless, angeltime Heart
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#2
(08-25-2018, 07:53 PM)Hi angeltime Wrote: Peace.....My understanding is that Peter was the first Bishop of Rome however he didn't live in Rome but in other areas.  So, who was the next Bishop after him and how did he become called POPE?  Did he appoint himself or was there some indication by Peter that he appointed or mentioned someone to be next after him?  Tks and God bless, angeltime Heart

Linus

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pope_Linus
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#3
Peter did indeed live in other places before he moved to Rome, but he lived there before his martyrdom on the Vatican Hill where the Basilica dedicated to him stands.

His successor was St Linus, who reigned for approximately ten years before his martyrdom. (lengths of reigns in the early Church are uncertain.)

'Pope' simply means 'Father'. The Patriarch of Alexandria traditionally was called Pope of Alexandria, which is why the Orthodox and many ECs refer to the Successor of Peter as the 'Pope of Rome'. Every Priest in the Orthodox Church is a 'pope', giving rise to the  to the surnames Papadopulos (Greek) Popov, Popovski, and Popovic (Slavic languages), all meaning 'son of a Priest'.

Pope is just an affectionate title. The Universal Primacy resides in the Bishop of Rome, not in the title.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

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#4
(08-25-2018, 08:18 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: Peter did indeed live in other places before he moved to Rome, but he lived there before his martyrdom on the Vatican Hill where the Basilica dedicated to him stands.

His successor was St Linus, who reigned for approximately ten years before his martyrdom. (lengths of reigns in the early Church are uncertain.)

'Pope' simply means 'Father'. The Patriarch of Alexandria traditionally was called Pope of Alexandria, which is why the Orthodox and many ECs refer to the Successor of Peter as the 'Pope of Rome'. Every Priest in the Orthodox Church is a 'pope', giving rise to the  to the surnames Papadopulos (Greek) Popov, Popovski, and Popovic (Slavic languages), all meaning 'son of a Priest'.

Pope is just an affectionate title. The Universal Primacy resides in the Bishop of Rome, not in the title.

Peace.....the article I read, stated that Peter consecrated Linus and another to become Bishops overseeing more than Rome because he was retiring to a life of prayer.  This is what I wanted to get to the bottom of - who and how they or in particular Linus were officially Bishops or called Pope.  How did the authority grow so far over to the west?  God bless, angeltime Heart  tks for your info too!
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#5
The Pope is by definition the Bishop of Rome. Peter was the first Bishop of Rome, Linus was second. Por Francis is the 266th Bishop of Rome.

The word "Pope" only came to be used later and was not always exclusively used for the Bishop of Rome. It's more of a nickname than an actual title. Originally it was used for all western bishops.

His official title is 
"Bishop of RomeVicar of Jesus Christ, Successor of the Prince of the Apostles,Supreme Pontiff of the Universal Church, Primateof Italy, Archbishop and Metropolitan of the RomanProvinceSovereign of theVatican City StateServant of the servants of God."
Surréxit Dóminus vere, Alleluia!
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#6
(08-25-2018, 08:29 PM)Dominicus Wrote: The Pope is by definition the Bishop of Rome. Peter was the first Bishop of Rome, Linus was second. Por Francis is the 266th Bishop of Rome.

The word "Pope" only came to be used later and was not always exclusively used for the Bishop of Rome. It's more of a nickname than an actual title. Originally it was used for all western bishops.

His official title is 
"Bishop of RomeVicar of Jesus Christ, Successor of the Prince of the Apostles,Supreme Pontiff of the Universal Church, Primateof Italy, Archbishop and Metropolitan of the RomanProvinceSovereign of theVatican City StateServant of the servants of God."
Peace.....correct me if I am wrong - as we know there have been bad bishops (Popes) who have been put out of office.  Doesn't this cause a break in the lineage?  I mean a serious break - because we can't really just pick up and start over....??  God bless, angeltime Heart
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#7
I'm not sure what you mean. There have been bad popes but theyve never been kicked out of office. When a Pope dies or resigns the Church enters into a period of sede vacante where there is no bishop of Rome. During this time the new Bishop is decided, today this is done by the cardinals. The longest sede vacante in history that we know of was about 3 years.
Surréxit Dóminus vere, Alleluia!
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#8
(08-25-2018, 11:37 PM)Dominicus Wrote: I'm not sure what you mean. There have been bad popes but theyve never been kicked out of office. When a Pope dies or resigns the Church enters into a period of sede vacante where there is no bishop of Rome. During this time the new Bishop is decided, today this is done by the cardinals. The longest sede vacante in history that we know of was about 3 years.
Peace.....I am sure I heard of a pope or two that either had to resign which is the same as being asked to leave/kicked out.  I will check my info again.  Tks!  angeltime Heart
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#9
(08-26-2018, 02:06 AM)angeltime Wrote:
(08-25-2018, 11:37 PM)Dominicus Wrote: I'm not sure what you mean. There have been bad popes but theyve never been kicked out of office. When a Pope dies or resigns the Church enters into a period of sede vacante where there is no bishop of Rome. During this time the new Bishop is decided, today this is done by the cardinals. The longest sede vacante in history that we know of was about 3 years.
Peace.....I am sure I heard of a pope or two that either had to resign which is the same as being asked to leave/kicked out.  I will check my info again.  Tks!  angeltime Heart

There were popes that were pressured into resigning but ultimately they resigned because of their own choice. They weren't kicked out. Pope Benedict XVI for one.
Surréxit Dóminus vere, Alleluia!
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#10
Ironically, the last Pope to abdicate before Benedict XVI was a bad Pope, but a very holy man, Pope St Celestine V. Elected in the last non-conclave election after a sede vacante of two years, he was a hermit monk, the founder of the Celestine Reform of the Benedictines. He didn't want to be Pope, but was pressured into it as a compromise candidate.

He was pope for just over five months and voluntarily resigned after decreeing, as Pope, that a Pope could resign. It was that decree, ultimately incorporated into Canon Law, that allowed Benedict to resign. Almost all his other decrees were abrogated by his successor, Boniface VIII, of Unam sanctum fame.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


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