Some Very Old and Noteworthy Photos and Comentary to Peruse
#1
These are some remarkable images here, from an email link I received today.

Enjoy!


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[Image: dcgslogo.png]
Douglas County (of Georgia) Genealogical Society

Encouraging and enhancing genealogical research and knowledge.








More Interesting Old Photographs.  Sorry, no other information is available on these photographs.

[Image: Two Girls Waffle House - 1900.jpeg]

The first Waffle House? - circa 1900-1916. The Two Girls Waffle House was located in the tent city on the north side of Ship Creek in what is now Anchorage, Alaska. More information.

[Image: end-of-old-time-radio.jpg]

An evening at home - date unknown.

[Image: Nome Alaska - 4 July 1916.jpeg]

1916 4th of July Parade, Front Street, Nome Alaska.

[Image: Rural Mail Delivery - 1914.jpeg]

Rural Mail Delivery - circa 1914.

[Image: Pumping Gas - 1925.jpeg]

Pumping gasoline - circa 1925.

[Image: Detroit Opera House - 1906.jpg]

Detroit Opera House - 1906

[Image: Pancho Villa (Josoroteo Arango Arula).jpeg]

José Doroteo Arango Arámbula (Pancho Villa) - circa 1914.

[Image: General Store - 1917.jpeg]

Old General Store - circa 1917.

[Image: Cowboy - 1888.jpeg]

Cowboy - circa 1888.

[Image: Cincinnati Street Car - 1913.jpeg]

Cincinnati Street Car - circa 1913.

[Image: Bea Authur - 1943.jpg]

Bea Arthur (nee Bernice Frankel) (1922-2009) SSgt. USMC 1943-45 WW II
Enlisted and assigned as typist at Marine HQ in Wash DC, then air stations in VA and NC.  Best remembered for her title role in the TV series "Maude" and as Dorothy in "Golden Girls".

[Image: Lucille Ball - 1930.jpg]

Lucille Ball - circa 1930.

[Image: Miss America - 1924.jpg]

Miss America - 1924.  My, my - how our standards of beauty have changed!

[Image: John Fitzgerald Kennedy.jpg]

John Fitzgerald Kennedy - as a boy.

[Image: Emily Todd.jpg]

Emily Todd was Mary Todd Lincoln's half-sister.  In 1856 she married Benjamin Helm, a Confederate general.  After Helm's death in 1863 Emily Helm passed through Union Lines to visit her sister in the White House.  This caused great consternation in the Northern newspapers.  Emily Helm took an oath of loyalty to the Union and was granted amnesty.

[Image: Elder George Bush.jpg]

Three days before his 19th birthday, George H.W. Bush became the youngest aviator in the US Navy.

NOTICE:President Bush became what he believed (at the time) to be the youngest aviator in the U.S. Navy. I also believed that, but lately have learned differently.

For years, the former President, a TBM Avenger torpedo bomber pilot, thought he was the youngest Naval Aviator of the war, but Chuck Downey, of Poplar Grove, Illinois, has the President beat by 11 days, a fact the President has since acknowledged.

Downey was born Aug. 2, 1924, in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and commissioned an Ensign in the U.S. Navy on July 16, 1943.  He earned his Wings of Gold at the tender age of 18 years, 11 months and 14 days and later flew SB2C Helldiver dive bombers off the carrier U.S.S. Ticonderoga.  You can read more about Mr. Downey at The Youngest Naval Aviator of WWII

Mr. Downey passed away on February 19, 2016.

[Image: Walter Reed - 1918.jpg]

Washington, D.C., circa 1919.
Walter Reed Hospital flu ward.  One of the very few images in Washington area photo archives documenting the influenza contagion of 1918-1919, which killed over 500,000 Americans and tens of millions around the globe.  Most victims succumbed to bacterial pneumonia following influenza virus infection.

[Image: San Francisco - 1906.jpg]

Market Street, San Francisco, after the earthquake, 1906.

[Image: Sacajawea.jpg]

NOTICE: It has come to my attention that this cannot possibly be a real photograph of Sacajawea, as she died prior to the invention of photography.  My best guess is that this is a photo of a wax museum piece, or a staged/posed recreation.

Late Breaking: I have learned that this is a studio portrait owned by the Genealogy Department of the Denver Public Library, and was made in 1884 or 1885.  It is actually Mary Enos, a Native American (Shoshone) woman, and a baby in a cradleboard.  Thanks to Walter Graham.  In any event, I'm leaving it up.

Sacajawea - Stolen, held captive and sold, eventually reunited the Shoshone Indians.  She was an interpreter and guide for Lewis and Clark in 1805-1806 with her husband Toussaint Charbonneau. She navigated carrying her son, Jean Baptiste, on her back.  She traveled thousands of miles from the Dakotas to the Pacific Ocean.  The explorers said she was cheerful, never complained, and proved to be invaluable.  She served as an adviser and caretaker, and she is legendary for her perseverance and resourcefulness.

[Image: Rosie the Riveter.jpg]

Naomi Parker-Fraley, who was the inspiration behind the famous Rosie the Riveter poster.

NOTICE: I must apologize for having used the wrong name (Geraldine Doyle) for this photo for several years.  This was brought to my attention by a visitor, (Julie Jimenez), who offered proof of her contention with this web page from Harpers Bazaar magazine.  As you can see, I was not alone in this mis-identification.  Thank you, Julie!

[Image: Going Home.jpg]

April 1945.  Chief Petty Officer Graham Jackson plays "Going Home" as FDR's body is borne past in Warm Springs, GA, where the President was scheduled to attend a barbecue on the day he died.

[Image: Broad Street.jpg]

Wagon train on Marietta Street, Atlanta.  Citation (Library of Congress): Barnard, George N, photographer. Atlanta, Ga. Wagon train on Marietta Street. Atlanta Georgia United States, 1864. Photograph.
[Image: Bonnie and Clyde Car.jpg]

Bonnie and Clyde's car following the shootout that ended the two outlaws.  The gunfire barrage was so loud that many members of the posse experienced temporary deafness.

[Image: Samuel Decker.jpg]

Civil War veteran Samuel Decker poses with the prosthetic arms he made for himself... somehow.  Perhaps with his teeth?

[Image: Attica Inmates Playing Chess.jpg]

Inmates at Attica play chess.

[Image: American Soldiers in trench.jpg]

American soldiers hunker down in a trench less than a mile away from the detonation of a 43 kiloton nuclear bomb in 1953.

[Image: Mark Twain with Cigar - 1905.jpg]

Mark Twain smokes a cigar in 1906.

[Image: LAPD Officers Undercover - 1960.jpg]

LAPD police officers going undercover in 1960 to catch purse snatchers.

[Image: Children in Iron Lung - 1937.jpg]

Children in iron lungs in 1937, before the advent of the polio vaccine.

[Image: Cincinnati Main Library - 1950.jpg]

Cincinnati's cavernous main library, demolished in 1955.

[Image: Knickerbocker Baseball Club - 1858.jpg]

The first known sports team photo ever taken, the 1858 Knickerbocker Base Ball Club, Hoboken, New Jersey.

[Image: Albert Einstein at Grand Canyon - 1922.jpg]

Albert Einstein visits The Grand Canyon in 1922.

[Image: Eisenhower and Patton inspect art treasures - 1945.jpg]

1945 - Eisenhower. Bradley and Patton examine a trove of stolen artifacts that the Germans hid in salt mine.

[Image: American Field Hospital - 1918.jpg]

An American field hospital in the bombed out remains of a French church in 1918.

[Image: The Louiseville Flood - 1937.jpg]

Waiting in line following the Louisville flood of 1937.

[Image: JFK and Bobby - 1960.jpg]

John F. and Bobby Kennedy in 1960.

[Image: School Children with Bison - 1899.jpg]

A group of school children visit a bison in 1899.

[Image: Old and New Mail Delivery.jpg]

Although not a true historical photo, this is intended to illustrate the advances in communications technology in the space of a mere 57 years (less than my life time).  For thousands of years, the horse was the fastest way to send a written message.  But then, due to technology, the pace increased by more than 2000 times.  This happened as we moved from 40 miles per day on horseback, at end of the Pony Express in 1861 to 100 miles per hour in an airplane, with the inception of Air Mail service in 1918.

[Image: First Hospital Ambulance - 1869.jpg]

The first ambulance: Bellevue Hospital Center, NY, 1869.

[Image: Abraham Lincoln - 1862.jpg]

Abraham Lincoln inspects the battlefield in 1862.

[Image: Bison Skull Pile - 1870s.jpg]

A mountain of bison skulls ready to be ground into fertilizer.  This picture was taken in the 1880s at the Michigan Carbon Works in Detroit, and the original of this image is at the Burton Collection of the Detroit Public Library.  This additional information thanks to Le Roy G. Barnett, PhD.

[Image: Michigan Loggers - 1890.jpg]

Michigan loggers in 1890.

[Image: Pouring Liquor - 1921.jpg]

Prohibition begins and alcohol is poured down the drain in 1921.

[Image: 12th Street Miami - 1908.jpg]

12th Street in Miami, Florida in 1908.

[Image: Alabama School House - 1935.jpg]

An Alabama schoolhouse in 1935.

[Image: Sitting Bull and Buffalo Bill - 1885.jpg]

Sitting Bull and Buffalo Bill pose together in 1885.

[Image: Road to Woodstock - 1969.jpg]

The road leading to Woodstock in 1969.

[Image: Lewis Powell - 1865.jpg]

Lewis Powell, taken by Alexander Gardner just before Powell's execution on 7 July 1865. for being a co-conspirator in Lincoln's Assassination.

[Image: valid-html401]
Page Last Updated: 12/14/2018

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One should have an open mind; open enough that things get in, but not so open that everything falls out
 
A democracy which makes or even effectively prepares for modern, scientific war must necessarily cease to be democratic. No country can be really well prepared for modern war unless it is governed by a tyrant, at the head of a highly trained and perfectly obedient bureaucracy
Huxley
 
The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil, but by those who watch them without doing anything  
Einstein
 
Its no wonder truth is stranger than fiction.
Fiction has to make sense
Mark Twain
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#2
(01-10-2019, 04:41 PM)Zedta Wrote: These are some remarkable images here, from an email link I received today.

Enjoy!

[Image: Old and New Mail Delivery.jpg]

Although not a true historical photo, this is intended to illustrate the advances in communications technology in the space of a mere 57 years (less than my life time).  For thousands of years, the horse was the fastest way to send a written message.  But then, due to technology, the pace increased by more than 2000 times.  This happened as we moved from 40 miles per day on horseback, at end of the Pony Express in 1861 to 100 miles per hour in an airplane, with the inception of Air Mail service in 1918.

Fascinating. This picture reminds me of a story. In July 1969, I was visiting my grandmother when the Apollo 11 mission returned to Earth after the moon landing. She was born in Sweden in 1876, the year of the Battle of the Little Bighorn, the same year that Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone.

I asked her what she thought about there having been men on the moon, mentioning that Colonel Aldrin was of Swedish descent. She sort of shrugged her shoulders, 'so what?' In her lifetime, she had seen the development of the automobile, airplane, and space travel. She had seen the development of radio and television, and the beginnings of the computer age, so men on the moon was no big deal.

However, about five minutes later, she turned to me and said, 'Do you mean there was a Swede on the moon?' Men on the moon was no big deal, but that one of her people had made it was a bit different.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

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#3
[Image: Sacajawea.jpg]

Sacajawea - Stolen, held captive and sold, eventually reunited the Shoshone Indians.  She was an interpreter and guide for Lewis and Clark in 1805-1806 with her husband Toussaint Charbonneau. She navigated carrying her son, Jean Baptiste, on her back.  She traveled thousands of miles from the Dakotas to the Pacific Ocean.  The explorers said she was cheerful, never complained, and proved to be invaluable.  She served as an adviser and caretaker, and she is legendary for her perseverance and resourcefulness

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Sacagawea's son Pomp led amazing life after traveling with Lewis and Clark
ED KEMMICK.
 
One of the most eventful lives in American history began on Feb. 11, 1805, in the Mandan Indian villages where the men of the Lewis and Clark Expedition were spending the winter.

Capt. Meriwether Lewis recorded the event in his journal: "about five oclock this evening one of the wives of Charbono was delivered of a fine boy."

The boy was Jean Baptiste Charbonneau, who would travel from Fort Mandan near the joining of the Missouri and Yellowstone rivers to the Pacific Coast and back again. His mother was Sacagawea, the Shoshone Indian woman who became, after the two captains, the best-known member of the expedition.

One of his earliest accomplishments was winning the heart of Capt. William Clark, who used the boy's nickname, Pomp, to christen the sandstone landmark where Clark carved his name and the date, July 25, 1806, on the return voyage from the Pacific. Called Pompy's Tower by Clark, it later became Pompey's Pillar and is now known officially as Pompeys Pillar National Monument.

For all the legends that attached themselves to Sacagawea, even the most fanciful imaginings of her life could hardly compare to the real-life adventures of her son. Educated in St. Louis, polished in the royal courts of Europe, Jean Baptiste would go on to be a companion of some of the most famous mountain men of the early 1800s.

He seems pretty much like a man for all seasons. The Shakespeare-quoting mountain man completely at home in the wilderness and also completely at home in aristocratic European culture.

After his travels in Europe and his life as a mountain man, Jean Baptiste went on to serve as a guide in the deserts of the Southwest and as the administrator of a mission in California. He was also a '49er, one of those who tried to cash in on the California Gold Rush. At 61, he died a lonely death in the southeast corner of Oregon, en route to the new gold fields around Montana's Virginia City.

Baby on board

Jean Baptiste was the son of Sacagawea and Toussaint Charbonneau, a French-Canadian fur trapper who signed on with the Lewis and Clark Expedition as an interpreter. Clark, in listing the members of the party, wrote, "Shabonah and his Indian Squaw to act as Interpreter & interpretess for the Snake Indians," as the Shoshone were also called.

There are scattered references to the child throughout the journals. Two of the longest mentions were written on May 22, 1806, when Lewis and Clark both noted Jean Baptiste's alarming illness. "Shabonoes Son a Small child is, dangerously ill," Clark wrote in his sometimes disjointed way. "[H]is jaw and throat is much Swelled. we apply a poltice of Onions. after giveing him Some creem of tarter &c."

On Aug. 4, 1806, Clark noted that poor Pomp "has been so much bitten by the musquetors that his face is much puffed up and swelled."

The presence of Sacagawea and her baby also did much to calm the fears of many tribes along the route of the expedition. The presence of a woman and child signified that the expedition was not a war party.

Imagine what it must have been like for the men of the expedition hearing a baby crying at night, hearing a mother's lullaby in a language they can't understand and Pomp taking his first steps, with 30 uncles standing around clapping.

Clark's fondness recorded

There is no need to imagine how strongly Clark became attached to Pomp. On Aug. 17, 1806, the day he paid off Toussaint Charbonneau for his services, Clark wrote in his journal that he offered to take Charbonneau's son, "a butifull promising Child who is 19 months old," and "raise the Child for him in Such a manner as I thought proper." Charbonneau and Sacagawea agreed to the proposal, but they wished to wait a year, until Pomp had been weaned.

Having left the parents at the Mandan villages, Clark found he wasn't through with them yet. He sent a letter back to Charbonneau with some traders on Aug. 20, thanking him for his services and saying he wished he had done more to secure his future prospects. And then he added: "As to your little Son (my boy Pomp) you well know my fondness for him and my anxiety to take and raise him as my own child. I once more tell you if you will bring your son Baptiest to me I will educate him and treat him as my own child."

He closed the letter by "Wishing you and your family great suckcess & with anxious expectations of seeing my little danceing boy Baptiest."

It would actually be three more years before Pomp's parents brought their son to St. Louis, where he was baptized by a Trappist monk in December 1809. His education began in 1811, when Clark enrolled him at a Catholic Brothers seminary, where students were taught French, English, Latin, Greek, classical literature, history, science and mathematics.

He lived in a boarding house for half-Indian boys, his tuition and lodging paid for by Clark. After receiving news of the death of Sacagawea, most likely in 1812, Clark became the legal guardian of Jean Baptiste.

Sometime around 1821, Jean Baptiste was said to have left St. Louis for a settlement on the Kansas River, where he worked as a guide and interpreter. It was there, in June 1823, that Jean Baptiste met Prince Duke Paul Wilhelm of Wurttemberg, Germany, who was on a scientific expedition in the United States.

Questionable status

Duke Paul, with Clark's permission, invited Jean Baptiste to live with him in Germany as his "Gunstling," or servant. There is some debate as to Jean Baptiste's status during his years with Duke Paul, but one of Pomp's most recent biographers, Albert Furtwangler, believes Jean Baptiste and a Mexican servant of the duke's "led confined lives in Germany," serving "at his command, afraid of his displeasure, surrounded by his realm."

However it was, Jean Baptiste traveled with the duke into various palaces of Germany, France and England, and he accompanied him on a trip to North Africa. The duke was said to have referred to him as his "hunter extraordinary," and one historian reported that an American minister visiting Stuttgart in 1927 saw an oil painting titled "Price Paul and his Indian boy." There is no other record of such a painting, and no known contemporary depiction of Jean Baptiste, either in paintings or photographs.

A German researcher discovered less than 10 years ago that Jean Baptiste fathered a child in Germany with the unmarried daughter of a soldier. Baptismal records listed the father as "Johann Baptist Charbonnau of St. Louis, 'called the American in the service of Duke Paul.'" The child lived only three months.

Jean Baptiste and the duke returned to the United States in 1829 and ascended the Missouri together, after which they parted ways. Jean Baptiste spent the next 15 years as a mountain man, crossing paths and working with Jim Bridger, Kit Carson, James Beckwourth and Andrew Sublette, among others.

He must have been one of the most unusual men in that collection of extraordinary characters — the boy who traveled with Lewis and Clark, who had been to Europe, who spoke German, French, Spanish, English and several Indian languages. One traveler said he was "well stored with choice reading, and enriched by extensive travel and observation."

With the Mormon battalion

In 1846, Jean Baptiste signed on as a guide for Col. Philip St. George Cooke and his Mormon battalion, marching to fight in the Mexican War. Jean Baptiste led the battalion from New Mexico to San Diego, and he was frequently mentioned in the diaries of the trip. One of the favorite stories from that expedition involved Jean Baptiste's encounter with three bears. Col. Cooke recounted how "the bold hunter" pursued the bears among the rocks of a pass. Two shots were heard in quick succession, then "loud fierce cries," including those of the hunter.

"I much feared he was lost," Cooke wrote, "but soon, in his red shirt, he appeared on a rock; he had cried out, in Spanish, for more balls. The bear was rolled down, and butchered before the wagons passed."

Having arrived in California, Jean Baptiste was appointed alcalde for the mission of San Luis Rey, north of San Diego, in November 1847. The alcalde was a kind of mayor or administrator, one of whose duties was to tend to the needs of the Indians, who it's said were kept as virtual slaves of the rancheros, or land owners.

Jean Baptiste resigned the next year. An official report said he did a good job, but being "a half-breed Indian of the U.S. is regarded by the people as favoring the Indians more than he should do, and hence there is much complaint against him."

Heading north from San Diego, Jean Baptiste spent many years in Northern California, mining for gold with Beckwourth and later working as a clerk at the Orleans Hotel in Auburn, Calif. At the age of 61 he heard of new goldfields discovered in Montana. Once more, accompanied by two others, he set out on an adventure.

He made it as far as Oregon, where after crossing the frigid Owyee River he supposedly died of pneumonia at Inskip Station in southeastern Oregon. He died there on May 16, 1866, and he was buried near the town of Danner. His grave there has been restored by the Oregon chapter of the Lewis and Clark Heritage Trail Foundation.

On July 7, 1866, the Placer Herald in Auburn carried his obituary, describing him as having been "born in the western wilds, and grew up a hunter, trapper, and pioneer." It said reports of the gold discoveries in Montana "excited the imagination of the old trapper, and he determined to return to the scenes of his youth."

"Though strong of purpose, the weight of years was too much for the hardships of the trip undertaken, and he now sleeps alone by the bright waters of the Owyhee."

Note that the obituary made no mention of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, which would have been sufficient as a claim to fame for most people.

At the end of his life, he wasn't living on that reputation anymore, he was living on his own reputation.

Rest in peace Pomp


https://billingsgazette.com/news/state-a...06562.html


Oh, where are the snows of yesteryear!
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#4
Wonderful photos, Zedta. May I suggest a site to you? Shorpy.com has spent quite a bit of time digitizing the glass negatives in the National Archives, and high resolutions. Here's an example at full size:[Image: SHORPY-8c03777a.jpg]
Eternal Father, I offer Thee the most precious blood of Thy Divine Son, Jesus, in union with the Masses said Throughout the world today, for all the holy souls in Purgatory. Amen.
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#5
WOW!!

Amazing detail  and resolution considering the source was a glass plate photo!
One should have an open mind; open enough that things get in, but not so open that everything falls out
 
A democracy which makes or even effectively prepares for modern, scientific war must necessarily cease to be democratic. No country can be really well prepared for modern war unless it is governed by a tyrant, at the head of a highly trained and perfectly obedient bureaucracy
Huxley
 
The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil, but by those who watch them without doing anything  
Einstein
 
Its no wonder truth is stranger than fiction.
Fiction has to make sense
Mark Twain
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#6
(01-12-2019, 11:48 PM)Zedta Wrote: WOW!!

Amazing detail  and resolution considering the source was a glass plate photo!

I'm just curious as to why they were using glass plates in the 1930s or 40s (clothes and cars)?
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


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#7
I recently came across a YouTube channel that features restored black and white moving pictures with an added sound track. The one I am linking to is of Paris (it says 1896-1900, though I don't see anybody doing the can-can). The channel does have some American tracks though - and from other countries.
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#8
(01-10-2019, 04:41 PM)Zedta Wrote: These are some remarkable images here, from an email link I received today.

Enjoy!

Wow, great pictures, Zedta.

That Cincinnati Library one is inspiring/amazing.

What a travesty it was torn down.  

Seriously,  the loss of edifying housing for books is just tragic.  

One can imagine a Distopian future of only Ipads and kindles...
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#9
Not sure if this has been posted before, but here is a mesmerizing video of San Francisco in 1906 before the huge earthquake that destroyed most of the city and caused a lot of deaths.

Amazing to see this point in time where one can see horses about in the city as the motor car is slowly getting introduced.

Everybody is well dressed and dignified, poor and rich alike.

Just fascinating to think about who these people were.

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#10
(01-13-2019, 12:04 AM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(01-12-2019, 11:48 PM)Zedta Wrote: WOW!!

Amazing detail  and resolution considering the source was a glass plate photo!

I'm just curious as to why they were using glass plates in the 1930s or 40s (clothes and cars)?

Perhaps for the same reason some photographers still use black and white or color film today?
One should have an open mind; open enough that things get in, but not so open that everything falls out
 
A democracy which makes or even effectively prepares for modern, scientific war must necessarily cease to be democratic. No country can be really well prepared for modern war unless it is governed by a tyrant, at the head of a highly trained and perfectly obedient bureaucracy
Huxley
 
The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil, but by those who watch them without doing anything  
Einstein
 
Its no wonder truth is stranger than fiction.
Fiction has to make sense
Mark Twain
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