Canon 844.3
#1
§3. Catholic ministers administer the sacraments of penance, Eucharist, and anointing of the sick licitly to members of Eastern Churches which do not have full communion with the Catholic Church if they seek such on their own accord and are properly disposed. This is also valid for members of other Churches which in the judgment of the Apostolic See are in the same condition in regard to the sacraments as these Eastern Churches.

How can this be reconciled with what the church has always taught?
Reply
#2
(02-05-2019, 01:39 AM)For Petes Sake Wrote: How can this be reconciled with what the church has always taught?

Define "properly disposed".
Reply
#3
(02-05-2019, 01:50 AM)Paul Wrote:
(02-05-2019, 01:39 AM)For Petes Sake Wrote: How can this be reconciled with what the church has always taught?

Define "properly disposed".

How can you be out of communion and be properly disposed? 
Isn't this infallible?
Reply
#4
AFAIK Canon Law isn't infallible, if that's what you're asking. Also, don't be too worried. No Orthodox will approach the Catholic sacraments since it would lead directly to their excommunication. Paragraph 2 is the flip side, granting Catholics the right to seek the same sacraments from EO Priests, not that they would ever give Holy Communion to a Catholic!
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


Reply
#5
Canon Law is disciplinary, not infallible.

Law is an ordinance of reason promulgated by the proper authority for the purpose of promoting the common good. Church Law has as its common (and ultimate) good the salvation of souls. If a law does not foster or promote this, it does not seek the common good, and therefore isn't a good law.

The only way to reconcile this with the Catholic Faith is to follow Canon 21


Quote:In a case of doubt, the revocation of a pre-existing law is not presumed, but later laws must be related to the earlier ones and, insofar as possible, must be harmonized with them.

The corresponding canon from 1917 Code is canon 731 §2 (emphasis mine):


Quote:It is forbidden to administer the sacraments of the Church to heretics or schismatics, even though they err in good faith and ask for them, unless they have first renounced their errors and been reconciled with the Church.


The only way of interpreting this law in light of the Faith and previous law is to say that "properly disposed" means they have "first renounced their errors and been reconciled with the Church." That is, at the very least, in danger of death, a schismatic or heretic says he wants to become Catholic and there is no time to properly instruct him and go through the usual channels. Outside of danger of death or extreme circumstances, then, "properly disposed" would mean they have properly renouced their schism or heresy and have become Catholics, in which cases the Canon does not apply.

That's the only way to reconcile it with the Faith.
[-] The following 2 users Like MagisterMusicae's post:
  • Ginnyfree, jovan66102
Reply
#6
(02-08-2019, 08:07 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: Canon Law is disciplinary, not infallible.

Law is an ordinance of reason promulgated by the proper authority for the purpose of promoting the common good. Church Law has as its common (and ultimate) good the salvation of souls. If a law does not foster or promote this, it does not seek the common good, and therefore isn't a good law.

The only way to reconcile this with the Catholic Faith is to follow Canon 21


Quote:In a case of doubt, the revocation of a pre-existing law is not presumed, but later laws must be related to the earlier ones and, insofar as possible, must be harmonized with them.

The corresponding canon from 1917 Code is canon 731 §2 (emphasis mine):


Quote:It is forbidden to administer the sacraments of the Church to heretics or schismatics, even though they err in good faith and ask for them, unless they have first renounced their errors and been reconciled with the Church.


The only way of interpreting this law in light of the Faith and previous law is to say that "properly disposed" means they have "first renounced their errors and been reconciled with the Church." That is, at the very least, in danger of death, a schismatic or heretic says he wants to become Catholic and there is no time to properly instruct him and go through the usual channels. Outside of danger of death or extreme circumstances, then, "properly disposed" would mean they have properly renouced their schism or heresy and have become Catholics, in which cases the Canon does not apply.

That's the only way to reconcile it with the Faith.

Bingo!  Give that man the teddy bear!  I also think it gives some legs to the individual priest's own discernment at the time each instance occurs.  If a woman who's lived say as an Orthodox believer all her married life to please her husband but was never really practicing and is now a widow, desire reconciliation just after finding out she's got terminal cancer and goes to the Rectory, Father has the ability to reconcile her on his own time.  No need to send her down to the RCIA group to wait for an Easter Vigil night.  She can meet with him privately and no one can say one little word.  God bless.  Ginnyfree.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)