Homeschooling?
#11
thanks
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#12
(08-26-2019, 11:56 PM)Moira Wrote: Long time watcher here, don't think I've ever replied on a thread but I had a question for elsewhere and saw this one so thought I'd chime in, even if I'm a little past date.

Going into our tenth year of home schooling, my oldest just graduated and is in college now.

We have been eclectic with our curriculum, we use a lot of different resources, and that really works for us.  Each family will be different, but if you're having fun pulling from lots of different sources, that's not a wrong way to go.  My oldest had no problem being admitted to public and private colleges and getting offers of scholarships and grants even though we didn't pick one program and stick with it (of course, that system works for many families, also).

Congrats on your start, have a ball!

(12-13-2019, 06:15 AM)Lumuss Wrote:
(08-26-2019, 11:56 PM)Moira Wrote: Long time watcher here, don't think I've ever replied on a thread but I had a question for elsewhere and saw this one so thought I'd chime in, even if I'm a little past date.

Going into our tenth year of home schooling, my oldest just graduated and is in college now.

We have been eclectic with our curriculum, we use a lot of different resources, and that really works for us.  Each family will be different, but if you're having fun pulling from lots of different sources, that's not a wrong way to go.  My oldest had no problem being admitted to public and private colleges and getting offers of scholarships and casinority my grants even though we didn't pick one program and stick with it (of course, that system works for many families, also).

Congrats on your start, have a ball!



Please share your secrets of home schooling success and some resources, if possible. I gave up after 7-9 months of homeschooling, because it nearly grew into a nightmare with me being panicky and hot-tempered and my granddaughter crying all the time... My son was skeptical about all that and watched us carelessly. So eventually, we sent her to Kolbe Immaculata School.
Yeah, I am absolutelly agree, that would be very interesting to know..
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#13
I was homeschooled by a patient and wonderful mother, so I can give you a student's perspective on the matter. 

1. Be willing to be flexible. Each kid is different. I was a visual and "touch" learner. My sister was an auditory learner. You will have to find out what works for each kid, and be willing to go through lots of different curriculum and books. It can be helpful to ask friends who are also homeschooling if they will let you try out their books/programs/etc. before you commit to buying something that doesn't work for your child. 

2. READ ALOUD. I cannot stress this enough. Read everything you can get your hands on to the kids. They can color or put together a puzzle while you read to them. My most favorite memories of growing up are of my mother reading to me for hours a day. It taught me a love of books, a love of a good story, and really helped my reading comprehension. 

3. Let the kids have at least one extra-curricular activity, but no more than three. My sister and I both had music lessons and gymnastics. It helped us meet other kids and gave us a little break from the books. 

4. Take lots of field trips. Many local businesses are happy to give a free tour of their facilities if you give them proper advance notice. My mother would organize a group of local kids and tour a bakery, a brewery, a shoe factory, etc. This also helps kids think about what they might like to be later in life. 

5. Finally, perhaps most importantly, give the kids a sense of purpose and direction. Instill in them early the value of hard work, and make them do chores around the house (taking care of animals is great too). So much valuable learning and social conditioning happens on the home front. Teach them basic life skills and how to be a functional adult! And don't pressure them to go to a 4-year college if they don't want to. My one regret is how my folks pressured me into attending a 4-year college where I was miserable and graduated with a worthless degree that I have never used. I wish I could have gone to technical school instead. Encourage the boys to be mechanics, plumbers, carpenters, technicians. Encourage the girls to be nurses, teachers, or CNAs so they can support themselves until they get married. I floated around many different jobs because I didn't have a marketable degree. I ended up taking a job at a grocery store as a cashier and remember crying in the bathroom on my first day because here I had a college degree and I was stocking shelves (it ended up being the best job I'd ever had, but that's another story). 

Homeschooling is hard but oh so worth it. I fully intend to homeschool my kids.


St. Mary of Egypt, Ora Pro Nobis!







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#14
Our Lady of Victory has been publishing a monthly homeschooling newsletter, which occasionally has some nice articles with tips. They post them on their Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/lepantopress/

Or here is the link to the latest issue I received from their email: http://bit.ly/2FrOAQN
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