Women's History Month - the Catholic version
#11
St. Therese of Lisieux, the "Little Flower"

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"Generations of Catholics have admired this young saint, called her the "Little Flower", and found in her short life more inspiration for their own lives than in volumes by theologians.

Yet Therese died when she was 24, after having lived as cloistered Carmelite for less than ten years. She never went on missions, never founded a religious order, never performed great works. The only book of hers, published after her death, was an brief edited version of her journal called "Story of a Soul." (Collections of her letters and restored versions of her journals have been published recently.) But within 28 years of her death, the public demand was so great that she was canonized.

Over the years, some modern Catholics have turned away from her because they associate her with over- sentimentalized piety and yet the message she has for us is still as compelling and simple as it was almost a century ago.

Therese was born in France in 1873, the pampered daughter of a mother who had wanted to be a saint and a father who had wanted to be monk. The two had gotten married but determined they would be celibate until a priest told them that was not how God wanted a marriage to work! They must have followed his advice very well because they had nine children. The five children who lived were all daughters who were close all their lives.

Tragedy and loss came quickly to Therese when her mother died of breast cancer when she was four and a half years old. Her sixteen year old sister Pauline became her second mother -- which made the second loss even worse when Pauline entered the Carmelite convent five years later. A few months later, Therese became so ill with a fever that people thought she was dying.

The worst part of it for Therese was all the people sitting around her bed staring at her like, she said, "a string of onions." When Therese saw her sisters praying to statue of Mary in her room, Therese also prayed. She saw Mary smile at her and suddenly she was cured. She tried to keep the grace of the cure secret but people found out and badgered her with questions about what Mary was wearing, what she looked like. When she refused to give in to their curiosity, they passed the story that she had made the whole thing up.

Without realizing it, by the time she was eleven years old she had developed the habit of mental prayer. She would find a place between her bed and the wall and in that solitude think about God, life, eternity.

When her other sisters, Marie and Leonie, left to join religious orders (the Carmelites and Poor Clares, respectively), Therese was left alone with her last sister Celine and her father. Therese tells us that she wanted to be good but that she had an odd way of going about. This spoiled little Queen of her father's wouldn't do housework. She thought if she made the beds she was doing a great favor!

Every time Therese even imagined that someone was criticizing her or didn't appreciate her, she burst into tears. Then she would cry because she had cried! Any inner wall she built to contain her wild emotions crumpled immediately before the tiniest comment.

Therese wanted to enter the Carmelite convent to join Pauline and Marie but how could she convince others that she could handle the rigors of Carmelite life, if she couldn't handle her own emotional outbursts? She had prayed that Jesus would help her but there was no sign of an answer.

On Christmas day in 1886, the fourteen-year-old hurried home from church. In France, young children left their shoes by the hearth at Christmas, and then parents would fill them with gifts. By fourteen, most children outgrew this custom. But her sister Celine didn't want Therese to grow up. So they continued to leave presents in "baby" Therese's shoes.

As she and Celine climbed the stairs to take off their hats, their father's voice rose up from the parlor below. Standing over the shoes, he sighed, "Thank goodness that's the last time we shall have this kind of thing!"

Therese froze, and her sister looked at her helplessly. Celine knew that in a few minutes Therese would be in tears over what her father had said.

But the tantrum never came. Something incredible had happened to Therese. Jesus had come into her heart and done what she could not do herself. He had made her more sensitive to her father's feelings than her own.

She swallowed her tears, walked slowly down the stairs, and exclaimed over the gifts in the shoes, as if she had never heard a word her father said. The following year she entered the convent. In her autobiography she referred to this Christmas as her "conversion."

Therese be known as the Little Flower but she had a will of steel. When the superior of the Carmelite convent refused to take Therese because she was so young, the formerly shy little girl went to the bishop. When the bishop also said no, she decided to go over his head, as well.

Her father and sister took her on a pilgrimage to Rome to try to get her mind off this crazy idea. Therese loved it. It was the one time when being little worked to her advantage! Because she was young and small she could run everywhere, touch relics and tombs without being yelled at. Finally they went for an audience with the Pope. They had been forbidden to speak to him but that didn't stop Therese. As soon as she got near him, she begged that he let her enter the Carmelite convent. She had to be carried out by two of the guards!

But the Vicar General who had seen her courage was impressed and soon Therese was admitted to the Carmelite convent that her sisters Pauline and Marie had already joined. Her romantic ideas of convent life and suffering soon met up with reality in a way she had never expected. Her father suffered a series of strokes that left him affected not only physically but mentally. When he began hallucinating and grabbed for a gun as if going into battle, he was taken to an asylum for the insane. Horrified, Therese learned of the humiliation of the father she adored and admired and of the gossip and pity of their so-called friends. As a cloistered nun she couldn't even visit her father.

This began a horrible time of suffering when she experienced such dryness in prayer that she stated "Jesus isn't doing much to keep the conversation going." She was so grief-stricken that she often fell asleep in prayer. She consoled herself by saying that mothers loved children when they lie asleep in their arms so that God must love her when she slept during prayer.

She knew as a Carmelite nun she would never be able to perform great deeds. " Love proves itself by deeds, so how am I to show my love? Great deeds are forbidden me. The only way I can prove my love is by scattering flowers and these flowers are every little sacrifice, every glance and word, and the doing of the least actions for love." She took every chance to sacrifice, no matter how small it would seem. She smiled at the sisters she didn't like. She ate everything she was given without complaining -- so that she was often given the worst leftovers. One time she was accused of breaking a vase when she was not at fault. Instead of arguing she sank to her knees and begged forgiveness. These little sacrifices cost her more than bigger ones, for these went unrecognized by others. No one told her how wonderful she was for these little secret humiliations and good deeds.

When Pauline was elected prioress, she asked Therese for the ultimate sacrifice. Because of politics in the convent, many of the sisters feared that the family Martin would taken over the convent. Therefore Pauline asked Therese to remain a novice, in order to allay the fears of the others that the three sisters would push everyone else around. This meant she would never be a fully professed nun, that she would always have to ask permission for everything she did. This sacrificewas made a little sweeter when Celine entered the convent after her father's death. Four of the sisters were now together again.

Therese continued to worry about how she could achieve holiness in the life she led. She didn't want to just be good, she wanted to be a saint. She thought there must be a way for people living hidden, little lives like hers. " I have always wanted to become a saint. Unfortunately when I have compared myself with the saints, I have always found that there is the same difference between the saints and me as there is between a mountain whose summit is lost in the clouds and a humble grain of sand trodden underfoot by passers-by. Instead of being discouraged, I told myself: God would not make me wish for something impossible and so, in spite of my littleness, I can aim at being a saint. It is impossible for me to grow bigger, so I put up with myself as I am, with all my countless faults. But I will look for some means of going to heaven by a little way which is very short and very straight, a little way that is quite new." "

https://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=105
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#12
St. Joan of Arc

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"St. Joan of Arc is the patroness of soldiers and of France.

On January 6, 1412, Joan of Arc was born to pious parents of the French peasant class in the obscure village of Domremy, near the province of Lorraine. At a very early age, she was said to have heard the voices of St. Michael, St. Catherine, and St. Margaret. At first the messages were personal and general, but when she was 13-years-old, she was in her father's garden and had visions of Saint Michael, Saint Catherine, and Saint Margaret, each of whom told her to drive the English from French territory. They also asked that she bring the Dauphin to Reims for his coronation.

After their messages were delivered and the saints departed, Joan cried, as "they were so beautiful."

When she was sixteen-years-old, she asked her relative, Durand Lassois, to take her to Vaucouleurs, where she petitioned Robert de Baudricourt, the garrison commander, for permission to visit the French Royal Court in Chinon.

Despite Baudricourt's sarcastic response to her request, Joan returned the following January and left with the support of two of Baudricourt's soldiers: Jean de Metz and Bertrand de Poulengy.

Jean de Metz admitted Joan had confided in him, saying, "I must be at the King's side ... there will be no help if not from me. Although I would rather have remained spinning [wool] at my mother's side ... yet must I go and must I do this thing, for my Lord wills that I do so."

With Metz and Poulengy at her side, Joan met Baudricourt and predicted a military reversal at the Battle of Rouvray near Orléans, which were confirmed several days later by a messenger's report. When Baudricourt realized the distance of the battle's location and the time it would have taken Joan to make the journey, he concluded she had seen the reversal by Divine revelation, which caused him to believe her words.

Once she had Baudricourt's belief, Joan was granted an escort to Chinon through hostile Burgundian territory. For her safety, she was escorted while dressed as a male soldier, which later led to charges of cross-dressing, but her escorts viewed as a sound precaution.
Two members of her escort confirmed they and the people of Vaucouleurs gave her the clothing and had been the ones to suggest she don the outfit.

When she arrived in the Royal Court, she met in a private conference with Charles VII and won his trust. Yolande of Aragon, Charles' mother-in-law, planned a finance relief expedition to Orléans and Joan asked to travel with the army while wearing armor, which the Royal government agreed to. They also provided Joan's armor and she depended on donations for everything she took with her.
With a donated horse, sword, banner, armor, and more, Joan arrived to Orléans and quickly turned the Anglo-French conflict into a religious war.

Charles' advisors worried Joan's claims of doing God's work could be twisted by his enemies, who could easily claim she was a sorceress, which would link his crown to works of the devil. To prevent accusations, the Dauphin ordered background inquiries and a theological exam at Poitiers to verify Joan's claims.

In April 1429, the commission of inquiry "declared her to be of irreproachable life, a good Christian, possessed of the virtues of humility, honesty and simplicity." Rather than deciding on whether or not Joan was acting on the basis of divine inspiration, theologians at Poitiers told the Dauphin there was a "favorable presumption" on the divine nature of her mission.

Charles was satisfied with the report but theologians reminded him Joan must be tested. They claimed, "[t]o doubt or abandon her without suspicion of evil would be to repudiate the Holy Spirit and to become unworthy of God's aid."

They suggested her test should be a test of her claim to lift the siege of Orléans, as she originally predicted would happen.

In response to the test, Joan arrived at Orléans on April 29, 1429, where Jean d'Orléans, the acting head of the ducal family of Orléans, ensured she was excluded from war councils and kept ignorant of battles.

During the five months prior to Joan's arrival to Orléans, the French had only attempted one offensive assault, which resulted in their defeat, but after her arrival, things began to change.

Though Joan claimed the army was always commanded by a nobleman and that she never killed anyone in battle since she preferred only to carry her banner, which she preferred "forty times" better than a sword, several noblemen claimed she greatly effected their decisions since they accepted she gave Divinely inspired advice.

On May 4, the Armagnacs captured the fortress of Saint Loup and the next day led to fortress Saint-Jean-le-Blanc, which was deserted. With Joan at the army's side, English troops approached the army to stop their advance but a cavalry charge was all it took to turn the English away without a fight.

The Armagnacs captured an English fortress build around the Les Augustins monastery and attacked the English stronghold Les Tourelles on May 7. Joan was shot with an arrow between her neck and shoulder as she held her banner outside Les Tourelles, but returned to encourage the final assault to take the fortress. The next day, the English retreated from Orléans and the siege was over.
When Joan was in Chinon and Poitiers, she had declared she would show a sign at Orléans, which many believe was the end of the siege. Following the departure of the English, prominent clergymen began to support her, including the Archbishop of Embrun and the theologian Jean Gerson, each of which wrote supportive treatises.

After the Orléans victory, Joan was able to persuade Charles VII to allow her to march into other battles to reclaim cities, each of which ended in victory. When the military supplies began to dwindle, they reached Troyes, where Brother Richard, a wandering friar, had warned the city about the end of the world and was able to convince them to plant beans, which yields an early harvest. Just as the beans ripened, Joan and the army arrived and was able to restore their supplies.

Following their march to Troyes, Joan and the French military made its way to Paris, where politicians failed to secure Duke Philip of Burgundy's agreement to a truce. Joan was present at the following battles and suffered a leg wound from a crossbow bolt. Despite one failed mission - taking La-Charité-sur-Loire" - Joan and her family were ennobled by Charles VII in reward of her actions on the battlefield.

A truce with England came following Joan's ennoblement but was quickly broken. When Joan traveled to Compičgne to help defend against an English and Burgundian siege, she was captured by Burgundian troops and held for a ransom of 10,000 livres tournois. There were several attempts to free her and Joan made many excape attempts, including jumping from her 70-foot (21m) tower, landing on the soft earth of a dry moat, but to no avail. She was eventually sold to the English for 10,000 gold coins and was then tried as a heretic and witch in a trial that violated the legal process of the time.

Clerical notary Nicolas Bailly, who was responsible to collect testimony against Joan, was unable to find any evidence against her. Without evidence, the courts lacked grounds to initiate trial but one was opened anyway. They denied Joan the right to a legal advisor and filled the tribunal with pro-English clergy rather than meeting the medieval Church's requirement to balance the group with impartial clerics.

When the first public examination opened, Joan pointed out that the partisans were against her and she asked for "ecclesiastics of the French side" to provide balance, but her request was denied.

Jean Lemaitre, the Vice-Inquisitor of Northern France, objected to the trial from the beginning and many eyewitnesses later reported he was forced to cooperate after the English threatened to kill him. Other members of the clergy were threatened when they refused as well, so the trial continued.

The trial record includes statements from Joan that eyewitnesses later claimed astonished the court since she was an illiterate peasant who was able to escape theological traps. The most well-known exchange was when Joan was "[a]sked if she knew she was in God's grace, she answered: 'If I am not, may God put me there; and if I am, may God so keep me.'"

The question is a trap because the church doctrine was that no one could be certain of being in God's grace. If she answered yes, she would have been charged with heresy, but if she answered no, she would have been confessing her own guilt. Notary Boisguillaume later testified that "[t]hose who were interrogating her were stupefied."

Many members of the tribunal later testified important parts of the transcript were altered.

Joan was held in a secular prison guarded by English soldiers, instead of being in an ecclesiastical prison with nuns as her guards per Inquisitorial guidelines. When Joan appealed to the Council of Basel and the Pope to be placed in a proper prison, Bishop Cauchon denied her request, which would have stopped his proceeding.

While imprisoned, Joan wore military clothing so she could tie her clothing together, making it harder to be raped. There was no protection in a dress, and a few days after she started wearing one she told a tribunal member that "a great English lord had entered her prison and tried to take her by force." Following the attempted rape, Joan returned to wearing male clothing as a precaution and to raise her defenses against molestation.

Jean Massieu testified her dress had been taken by the guards and she had nothing else to wear.
When she returned to male clothing, she was given another count of heresy for cross-dressing, though it was later disputed by the inquisitor presiding over court appeals after the war. He found that cross-dressing should be evaluated based on context, including the use of clothing as protection against rape if it offered protection.

In accordance to the inquisitor's doctrine, Joan would have been justified in wearing armor on a battlefield, men's clothing in prison and dressing as a pageboy when traveling through enemy territory.

The Chronique de la Pucelle states it deterred molestation when Joan was camped in the field but she donned a dress when men's garments were unnecessary.

Clergy who testified at the posthumous appellate trial confirmed that she wore male clothing in prison to deter molestation.

Though the Poitiers record did not survive the test of time, Joan had referred the court to the Poitiers inquiry when questioned about her clothing and circumstances indicate the Poitiers clerics approved the practive. She had also kept her hair short through the military campaigns and during her imprisonment, which Inquisitor Brehal, theologian Jean Gerson and all of Joan's supporters understood was for practical reasons.

Despite the lack of incriminating evidence, Joan was condemned and sentenced to die in 1431.

Eyewitness accounts of Joan's execution by burning on May 30, 1431 describe how she was tied to a tall pillar at the Vieux-Marché in Rouen. She asked Fr. Martin Ladvenu and Fr. Isambart de la Pierre to hold a crucifix before her and an English soldier made a small cross she put in the front of her dress. After she died, the English raked the coals to expose her body so no one could spread rumors of her escaping alive, then they burned her body two more times to reduce it to ashes so no one could collect relics. After burning her body to ash, the English threw her remains into the Seine River and the executioner, Geoffroy Thérage, later said he "... greatly feared to be damned."

In 1452, during an investigation into Joan's execution, the Church declared a religious play in her honor at Orléans would let attendees gain an indulgence by making a pilgrimage to the event.

A posthumous retrial opened following the end of the war. Pope Callixtus III authorized the proceeding, which has also been called the "nullification trial," after Inquisitor-General Jean Bréhal and Joan's mother Isabelle Romée requested it.

The trial was meant to determine if Joan's condemnation was justly handled, and of course at the end of the investication Joan received a formal appeal in November 1455 and the appellate court declared Joan innocent on July 7 1456.

Joan of Arc was a symbol of the Catholic League during the 16th century and when Félix Dupanloup was made bishop of Orléans in 1849, he pronounced a panegyric on Joan of Arc and led efforts leading to Joan of Arc's beatification in 1909. On May 16, 1920, Pope Benedict XV canonized her.

Centuries after her death, Joan became known as a semi-legendary figure. There were several sources of information about her life, time on the battlefield and trials, with the main sources being chronicles.

Many women have seen Joan as a brave and active woman who operated within a religious tradition that believed a person of any class could receive a divine calling.

Joan of Arc has been depicted in several works by famous writers such as William Shakespeare (Henry VI, Part 1), Voltaire (The Maid of Orleans), Mark Twain (Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc), and many many more.

Images depicting Joan of Arc often show her with short hair adorned in armor.

There are several prayers to Joan of Arc, including the "Prayer of Thanks and Gratitude to St. Joan of Arc," written by Andrea Rau:

Dear Patron Saint,

Thank you for accompanying me throughout the day, and in the work that I did. Thank you also for your guidance and your counsel. 
Please help me to listen to God and to you, dear Saint, that I may do what I am called to do. Please intercede on my behalf and beg God to take all my faults and turn them into virtues. I thank you for all you have done for me, and all the things you have interceded for on my behalf. Please continue to pray for me and for all the souls who need it.

St. Joan of Arc, Pray for us.

Amen."

https://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=295
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#13
Empowering Women in Holiness: The 4 Female Doctors of the Church

From ChurchPOP
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Many women throughout salvation history have represented signs of holiness, love, and service to God.
But only four of them earned the title “Doctor of the Church.”


The Church gives this title to those who “have advanced the Church’s knowledge of our faith” “through their research, study, and writing.


There are only four female Doctors of the Church: St. Teresa of Avila, St. Catherine of Siena, St. Thérèse of Lisieux, and St. Hildegard of Bingen.


Pope Paul VI declared St. Teresa of Avila and St. Catherine of Siena the first female Doctors of the Church in 1970.


St. John Paul II declared St. Therese of Lisieux a Doctor of the Church 1997, and Pope Benedict XVI declared St. Hildegard of Bingen a Doctor in 2012.


St. Teresa of Avila
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Teresa of Avila was born in Avila, Spain in 1515. This Carmelite nun, writer and mystic was the great reformer of the Carmelite Order.

Her official title is the “Doctor of Prayer,” or “Doctor Orationis.”

During Pope Paul VI’s 1970 homily declaring St. Teresa as a Doctor of the Church, he said:


“It was already admitted, we can say by unanimous consent, this prerogative of Saint Teresa, to be a mother, to be a teacher of spiritual people.


“A mother full of enchanting simplicity, a teacher full of wonderful depth.


“The suffrage of the tradition of the saints,
of the theologians,
of the Faithful,
of the scholars had already assured her;
we have now validated it,
making sure that,
adorned with this magisterial title,
she has a more authoritative mission to accomplish,
in her religious family and in the praying Church and in the world,
with her perennial and present message: the message of prayer.”


St. Teresa of Avila is the patron saint of bodily illnesses and headaches. She died in Avila in 1582. Her feast day is October 15.


St. Catherine of Siena
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St. Catherine of Siena was born in 1347 in Italy and lived until 1380. She was a Dominican nun, theologian, philosopher, and mystic.

She firmly defended the Church and the pope, especially in a period when many conflicts arose against him.
In his homily declaring her a Doctor, Pope Paul VI said that she addressed “cardinals and many Bishops and priests, she…did not spare strong reproaches, but always in all humility and respect for their dignity as ministers of the Blood of Christ.”


He added, “How then can we not remember the intense work carried out by the Saint for the reform of the Church?


“It is mainly to the sacred shepherds that she addresses her exhortations, disgusted with holy indignation by the ignorance of not a few of them, quivering for their silence, while the flock entrusted to them was dispersed and ruined.”


He then referenced Saint Catherine of Siena, who said, “The world is rotten because of silence.”


What an example of strength and bravery!


St. Catherine is the co-patroness of Italy, Rome, and Europe. Her feast day is April 29.


Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus
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St. Thérèse lived from 1873-1897 in France. She entered the Carmelite cloister as a postulant at age 15. She greatly desired to be a missionary.

When declaring her a Doctor of the Church in 1997, St. John Paul II said:

“Jesus himself showed her how she could live this [missionary] vocation. By fully practicing the commandment of love, she would immerse herself in the very heart of the Church’s mission, supporting those who proclaim the Gospel with the mysterious power of prayer and communion.

“Thus she achieved what the Second Vatican Council emphasized in teaching that the Church is missionary by nature (cf. Ad gentes, n. 2). Not only those who choose the missionary life but all the baptized are in some way sent ad gentes.

“This is why I chose this missionary Sunday to proclaim St Thérèse of the Child Jesus and the Holy Face a doctor of the universal Church: a woman, a young person, a contemplative.”

St. Thérèse is the patron saint of missionaries. She died from tuberculosis at age 24. Her feast day is October 1.
St. Hildegard of Bingen


Saint Hildegard of Bingen was born in Germany, and lived between 1098 and 1179.


Saint Hildegard was a Benedictine nun, mystic, and theologian. She also worked in medicine and natural sciences. St. John Paul II described her as a “light for her people and her time” .


When Pope Benedict XVI declared Saint Hildegard a doctor of the Church, he said in his Apostolic Letter:
“Hildegard has great significance for today’s world and an extraordinary importance for women.


“In Hildegard are expressed the most noble values of womanhood: hence the presence of women in the Church and in society is also illumined by her presence, both from the perspective of scientific research and that of pastoral activity.


“Her ability to speak to those who were far from the faith and from the Church make Hildegard a credible witness of the new evangelization.”


St. Hildegard’s feast day is September 17.


Sts. Teresa of Avila, Catherine of Siena, Therese of Lisieux, & Hildegard of Bingen, please pray for all women!
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
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“Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog.)” 
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#14
(03-10-2019, 04:51 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: Empowering Women in Holiness: The 4 Female Doctors of the Church

And who else talks about "empowering women"? I don't think it's any coincidence that we didn't get female Doctors (Doctrices?) of the Church until 1970, the same time that we got "women's lib" and the sexual revolution and abortion. The title of Doctor had always been one for Confessors, which is why St. Ignatius of Antioch isn't one. Was the Church really so sexist that it completely ignored women, until St Paul VI the Great came along and struck a blow for equality?

"Let women keep silence in the churches: for it is not permitted them to speak, but to be subject, as also the law saith. But if they would learn any thing, let them ask their husbands at home. For it is a shame for a woman to speak in the church", says the Apostle. But I guess Vatican II got rid of the idea that Scripture's the word of God, not just merely human. Or at least that's the impression one gets from listening to liberal Catholics, distinguishing between what God revealed and all that sexist stuff St Paul wrote in his letters. Not that he could help it, you know, being a product of his culture.

Yes, I suppose the title could be extended, since these saints didn't publicly teach, but it sends the wrong message to the faithful, that there's no distinction between men and women, furthering the argument for women priests and for the equivalence of the sexes in wider society. Valid, yes, but like so much else since 1970, imprudent.
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#15
(03-10-2019, 08:13 PM)Paul Wrote:
(03-10-2019, 04:51 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: Empowering Women in Holiness: The 4 Female Doctors of the Church

And who else talks about "empowering women"? I don't think it's any coincidence that we didn't get female Doctors (Doctrices?) of the Church until 1970, the same time that we got "women's lib" and the sexual revolution and abortion. The title of Doctor had always been one for Confessors, which is why St. Ignatius of Antioch isn't one. Was the Church really so sexist that it completely ignored women, until St Paul VI the Great came along and struck a blow for equality?

"Let women keep silence in the churches: for it is not permitted them to speak, but to be subject, as also the law saith. But if they would learn any thing, let them ask their husbands at home. For it is a shame for a woman to speak in the church", says the Apostle. But I guess Vatican II got rid of the idea that Scripture's the word of God, not just merely human. Or at least that's the impression one gets from listening to liberal Catholics, distinguishing between what God revealed and all that sexist stuff St Paul wrote in his letters. Not that he could help it, you know, being a product of his culture.

Yes, I suppose the title could be extended, since these saints didn't publicly teach, but it sends the wrong message to the faithful, that there's no distinction between men and women, furthering the argument for women priests and for the equivalence of the sexes in wider society. Valid, yes, but like so much else since 1970, imprudent.
Wow that's insightful & thought provoking, Paul, thanks. 

My take might be since we are in the Marian Age, (1830), maybe the Church was lead to empower women, be it a little late, and as far the awful 70's stuff, Satan never misses a trick, especially when it comes to Our Lady. 

It kind of supernatural physics: for every Holy action there is an opposite and equal evil reaction.


The whole world will be plunged into confusion through all sorts of incidents. The cross will be treated with contempt; it will be cast to the earth. Beside of Our Lord will be pierced again. - Blessed Virgin Mary to Sister Catherine Laboure
Oh, where are the snows of yesteryear!
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#16
(03-10-2019, 09:15 PM)Blind Horus Wrote: Wow that's insightful & thought provoking, Paul, thanks.

Thanks. I don't know if I'm just way off here - certainly "the world" would think so. At least you're thinking about it instead of just dismissing it as sexist nonsense. I don't know if the common Collect for virgin martyrs survived in the new Mass and Office, (I don't see it in the Common in the Liturgia Horarum), but I highly doubt it.

Quote:Deus, qui inter cétera poténtiæ tuæ mirácula étiam in sexu fragíli victóriam martýrii contulísti: concéde propítius: ut, qui beátæ N. Vírginis et Mártyris tuæ natalítia cólimus, per ejus ad te exémpla gradiámur. Per Dóminum.

O God, who among the other miracles of thy power hast granted even to the frail sex the victory of martyrdom: propitiously grant: that, we who honour the birthday of thy Virgin and Martyr N., may advance to thee by her example. Through our Lord.

(03-10-2019, 09:15 PM)Blind Horus Wrote: My take might be since we are in the Marian Age, (1830), maybe the Church was lead to empower women, be it a little late, and as far the awful 70's stuff, Satan never misses a trick, especially when it comes to Our Lady.

True, times change, and so does the structure of society, but the Church has always held Our Lady in the highest honour, even before her husband St Joseph, and this is the same Church that, for centuries before 1970, read "Wives, be subject to your husbands, as to the Lord" in its wedding liturgy. And at every Mass, the martyrs are invoked: "Felicity, Perpetua, Agatha, Lucy, Agnes, Cecilia, Anastasia", all of whom willingly chose death rather than sin. You don't get more "empowered" than that. How many 13-year-old girls today would stand up for the faith if threatened with death - or for that matter, jail - by any government today? Of course, if what she was asking for was the right to murder her unborn child, all we hear about is how "empowering" it is that she's allowed to even without parental consent. St Agnes stood up to the Roman Empire, the superpower of its day, and won the greatest prize there is, even if in the eyes of the world it's foolishness. The female martyrs listed in the Canon are some of my favourite saints, but it's also the tradition of the Church going back to the earliest times. Of course, their Offices are completely different from the male martyrs, recognising the differences between the sexes. (Interesting, no, that you don't see anyone clamouring for the title of Virgin to be given to men?)

Maybe if a 19th-century Pope, one thoroughly orthodox, declared a female saint a doctor of the Church, your take might be more likely, but the only Popes who have are the same ones who have given us all the novelties, including female altar boys. 

(03-10-2019, 09:15 PM)Blind Horus Wrote: It kind of supernatural physics: for every Holy action there is an opposite and equal evil reaction.

Mors est malis, vita bonis
Vide paris sumptionis
Quam sit dispar exitus.

St Thomas Aquinas's Sequence, while literally about the reception of the Eucharist, could also apply to the words of the Sacrament: "This is my body". Death to the evil, life to the good, see how equal reception has an unequal end. Use that phrase for good, you make God present on earth and all the grace that comes with that; use it for 'empowerment' and for 'women's rights', and you end up with millions of dead babies and souls lost forever.

(03-10-2019, 09:15 PM)Blind Horus Wrote: The whole world will be plunged into confusion through all sorts of incidents. The cross will be treated with contempt; it will be cast to the earth. Beside of Our Lord will be pierced again. - Blessed Virgin Mary to Sister Catherine Laboure

Wise words from Our Lady - often connected in the liturgy with divine wisdom (the Common reading for her feasts is Ego sapientia, Proverbs 8, which begins "I wisdom dwell in counsel, and am present in learned thoughts." And yet Our Lady has never been declared a Doctor of the Church. She's Queen of Doctors, but not one herself. You don't really get more empowered than queen, but everything our Queen does always points to her Son, our King, and her Queenship is rooted in obedience and motherhood, not violent conquest.
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#17
(03-11-2019, 01:55 AM)Paul Wrote:
(03-10-2019, 09:15 PM)Blind Horus Wrote: Wow that's insightful & thought provoking, Paul, thanks.

Thanks. I don't know if I'm just way off here - certainly "the world" would think so. At least you're thinking about it instead of just dismissing it as sexist nonsense. I don't know if the common Collect for virgin martyrs survived in the new Mass and Office, (I don't see it in the Common in the Liturgia Horarum), but I highly doubt it.

Quote:Deus, qui inter cétera poténtiæ tuæ mirácula étiam in sexu fragíli victóriam martýrii contulísti: concéde propítius: ut, qui beátæ N. Vírginis et Mártyris tuæ natalítia cólimus, per ejus ad te exémpla gradiámur. Per Dóminum.

O God, who among the other miracles of thy power hast granted even to the frail sex the victory of martyrdom: propitiously grant: that, we who honour the birthday of thy Virgin and Martyr N., may advance to thee by her example. Through our Lord.

(03-10-2019, 09:15 PM)Blind Horus Wrote: My take might be since we are in the Marian Age, (1830), maybe the Church was lead to empower women, be it a little late, and as far the awful 70's stuff, Satan never misses a trick, especially when it comes to Our Lady.

True, times change, and so does the structure of society, but the Church has always held Our Lady in the highest honour, even before her husband St Joseph, and this is the same Church that, for centuries before 1970, read "Wives, be subject to your husbands, as to the Lord" in its wedding liturgy. And at every Mass, the martyrs are invoked: "Felicity, Perpetua, Agatha, Lucy, Agnes, Cecilia, Anastasia", all of whom willingly chose death rather than sin. You don't get more "empowered" than that. How many 13-year-old girls today would stand up for the faith if threatened with death - or for that matter, jail - by any government today? Of course, if what she was asking for was the right to murder her unborn child, all we hear about is how "empowering" it is that she's allowed to even without parental consent. St Agnes stood up to the Roman Empire, the superpower of its day, and won the greatest prize there is, even if in the eyes of the world it's foolishness. The female martyrs listed in the Canon are some of my favourite saints, but it's also the tradition of the Church going back to the earliest times. Of course, their Offices are completely different from the male martyrs, recognising the differences between the sexes. (Interesting, no, that you don't see anyone clamouring for the title of Virgin to be given to men?)

Maybe if a 19th-century Pope, one thoroughly orthodox, declared a female saint a doctor of the Church, your take might be more likely, but the only Popes who have are the same ones who have given us all the novelties, including female altar boys. 

(03-10-2019, 09:15 PM)Blind Horus Wrote: It kind of supernatural physics: for every Holy action there is an opposite and equal evil reaction.

Mors est malis, vita bonis
Vide paris sumptionis
Quam sit dispar exitus.

St Thomas Aquinas's Sequence, while literally about the reception of the Eucharist, could also apply to the words of the Sacrament: "This is my body". Death to the evil, life to the good, see how equal reception has an unequal end. Use that phrase for good, you make God present on earth and all the grace that comes with that; use it for 'empowerment' and for 'women's rights', and you end up with millions of dead babies and souls lost forever.

(03-10-2019, 09:15 PM)Blind Horus Wrote: The whole world will be plunged into confusion through all sorts of incidents. The cross will be treated with contempt; it will be cast to the earth. Beside of Our Lord will be pierced again. - Blessed Virgin Mary to Sister Catherine Laboure

Wise words from Our Lady - often connected in the liturgy with divine wisdom (the Common reading for her feasts is Ego sapientia, Proverbs 8, which begins "I wisdom dwell in counsel, and am present in learned thoughts." And yet Our Lady has never been declared a Doctor of the Church. She's Queen of Doctors, but not one herself. You don't really get more empowered than queen, but everything our Queen does always points to her Son, our King, and her Queenship is rooted in obedience and motherhood, not violent conquest.

I've read Mary is considered the greatest teacher, so why wouldn't her students become Doctors be they women or men? 

 I hate to quibble over words, and I was apprehensive about empowered, but went ahead anyway. Its one of those over-used misguided words that make you want to turn and run when you hear it, like enlightened. If someone tells you they're enlightened, do run. 

Altar girls have nothing to do with who is a Doctor of the Church. Red herrings?

 One other point, most of the more renowned seers have been women, so in this Marian Age wouldn't you think it may be pleasing to Someone to make them Doctors of Her Son's Church?
Oh, where are the snows of yesteryear!
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#18
Bl. Margaret of Castello

[Image: xBlMargaretofCastello.jpg.pagespeed.ic.5x_X-dmpbF.jpg]

"It must have been about the year 1293 when some women of Citta-di-Castello in Umbria, who had gone one day to pray in their parish church, found within, a destitute blind child of about six or seven, who had been abandoned there by her parents. The kind souls were filled with pity for the little waif, and, poor though they were, they took charge of her - first one family and then another, sheltering and feeding her until she became practically the adopted child of the village. One and all declared that, far from being a burden, little Margaret brought a blessing upon those who befriended her. Some years later, the nuns of a local convent offered her a home. The girl rejoiced at the prospect of living with religious, but her joy was short-lived. The community was lax and worldly; Margaret's fervor was a tacit reproach to them, nor did she bring them the profit they had anticipated. Neglect was succeeded by petty persecution, and then by active calumny. Finally she was driven forth ignominiously to face the world once more.

However, her old friends rallied around her. One couple offered her a settled home, which became her permanent residence. At the age of fifteen, Margaret received the habit of a tertiary from the Dominican fathers, who had lately established themselves in Citta-di-Castello, and thence forth, she lived a life entirely devoted to God. More than ever did God's benediction rest upon her. She cured another tertiary of an affliction of the eyes which had baffled medical skill, and her mantle extinguished a fire which had broken out in her foster parents' house. In her desire to show her gratitude to the people of Citta-di-Castello, she undertook to look after the children while their parents were at work.

Her little school prospered wonderfully, for she understood children, being very simple herself. She set them little tasks which she helped them to perform; she instructed them in their duty to God and to man, instilling into them her own great devotion to the sacred Childhood, and she taught them the psalms which, inspite of her blindness, she had learned by heart at the convent. We are told that when at prayer she was frequently raised a foot or more from the ground, remaining thus for a long time. Thus she lived, practically unknown outside her own neighborhood, until the age of thirty-three, when she died amidst the friends who loved her, and was buried by their wish in the parish church, where many remarkable miracles took place. The cult of Blessed Margaret was confirmed in 1609."

https://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=233

Bl. Margaret's body is incorrupt.

[Image: e0ff9fd82ba4f0f35d45818253dace6b.jpg]
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#19
St. Catherine Laboure, recipient of the Miraculous Medal apparitions

[Image: saint-catherine-laboure.jpg]

"St. Catherine Laboure, virgin, was born on May 2, 1806. At an early age she entered the community of the Daughters of Charity, in Paris, France. Three times in 1830 the Virgin Mary appeared to St. Catherine Laboure, who then was a twenty-four year old novice.

On July 18, the first apparition occurred in the community's motherhouse. St. Catherine beheld a lady seated on the rightside of the sanctuary. When St. Catherine approached her, the heavenly visitor told her how to act in time of trial and pointed to the altar as the source of all consolation. Promising to entrust St. Catherine with a mission which would causeher great suffering, the lady also predicted the anticlerical revolt which occurred at Paris in 1870.

On November 27, the lady showed St. Catherine the medal of the Immaculate Conception, now universally known as the "Miraculous Medal." She commissioned St. Catherine to have one made, and to spread devotion to this medal. At that time, only her spiritual director, Father Aladel, knew of the apparitions. Forty-five years later, St. Catherine spoke fully of the apparitions to one of her superiors. She died on December 31, 1876, and was canonized on July 27, 1947. Her feast day is November 28."

https://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=266

St. Catherine's body is incorrupt.

[Image: St_Catherine_Laboure_1.jpg]
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#20
St. Philomena

[Image: philomena.gif]

"Little is known about the life of St. Philomena. However, it is believed she was a Greek princess who became a virgin martyr and died at 13-years-old.

Remains of a young lady were discovered in May 1802 at the Catacombs of Priscilla on the Via Salaria Nova with three tiles reading "Peace be to you, Philomena."

All that is known about St. Philomena's life comes from a Neapolitan nun's vision. Sister Maria Luisa di Gesu claims St. Philomena came to her and told her she was the daughter of a Greek king who converted to Christianity. When Philomena was 13-years-old, she took a vow of consecrated virginity.

After her father took his family to Rome to make peace, Emperor Diocletian fell in love with Philomena. When she refused to marry him, she was subjected to torture.

St. Philomena was scourged, drowned with an anchor attached to her, and shot with arrows. Each time she was attacked angels took to her side and healed her through prayer.

Finally, the Emperor had Philomena decapitated. According to the story, her death came on a Friday at three in the afternoon, the same as Jesus.

Two anchors, three arrows, a palm symbol of martyrdom, and a flower were found on the tiles in her tomb, interpreted as symbols of her martyrdom.

The nun's account states Philomena was born on January 10 and was killed on August 10.

Devotion for Philomena began to spread once her bones were exhumed and miracles began to occur. Canon Francesco De Lucia of Mugnano del Cardinale received relics of St. Philomena and had them placed in the Church of Our Lady of Grace in Mugnano, Italy.

Soon after her relics were enshrined, cancers were cured, wounds were healed and the Miracle of Mugnano, when Venerable Pauline Jaricot was cured of a severe heart issue overnight, were all attributed to St. Philomena.

Other Saints began to venerate Philomena and attributing miracles in their lives to the young martyr, including St. John Marie Vianney and St. Peter Louis Marie Chanel.

Although controversy sometimes surrounds the truth behind St. Philomena's life and sainthood, many believers all around the world continue to see her as a miraculous saint, canonized in 1837.

St. Philomena is the patron saint of infants, babies, and youth. She is often depicted in her youth with a flower crown, a palm of martyrdom, arrows, or an anchor.

Her feast day is celebrated on August 11."

https://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=98
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