Anger and charity
#1
I don't know if I could have titled this thread better.  I was reading an article on the Fisheaters website and it got me thinking.  It was this article: https://www.fisheaters.com/praeternaturalworld4.html.  I was struck by how utterly corrupted by evil some men can become.  In particular, the heinous monster named Peter Scully and the others mentioned in the article.  I kind of wish that I had paid heed to the clear warning in the article about the graphic nature of the crimes that were about to be described.  But, as I often do, I read anyway and I find myself wanting to see such men suffer the most severe punishments that can be (morally) meted out.  But that's not my question here.  I'm assuming I'm supposed to want to see these heinous murderers repent and avoid Hell.  Okay, with God's help I can do at least that.  However, and this is where my question really comes in, is it permissible to hope or want to see such men spend as long as possible in Purgatory?  What's my Christian duty here?
"For the true friends of the people are neither revolutionaries nor innovators, but traditionalists."
- Pope St. Pius X

"For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables."
- 2 Timothy 4:3-4

"Therefore God shall send them the operation of error, to believe lying: That all may be judged who have not believed the truth, but have consented to iniquity."
- 2 Thessalonians 2:11-12
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#2
I would say hoping for Purgatory definitely stems from charity, while your desire for a long stay there might reflect a desire for justice. Remember that anger is not a sinful emotion, especially when there is injustice. It's your Christian duty to be outraged at sin and its effects. I would say your reaction is healthy.
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

Put not your trust in princes: In the children of men, in whom there is no salvation. - Ps. 145:2-3

"For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables." - 2 Timothy 4:3-4
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#3
Firstly, to suffer a just punishment is a good thing, not an evil thing. It is evil to merit a punishment. That a murderer is executed for his crimes is a good thing (for him and for society). That he is worthy of such a punishment is a evil thing.

With that in mind, to want men who have merited a punishment to suffer that punishment is a good thing. You are wishing a good on them, and by this seeking the good of society. Not only is it good, but it is practicing several virtues : Charity (because you are wishing a good upon this person and society), Justice (because you are wanting to see this person and society receive what is due to each), Mercy (because seeing the harm done to this man's soul and society, you are wanting to relieve those harms) as well as specific parts of each of these.

Since God wants the soul of everyone, even the most wicked, to go to heaven, you must also desire this, even if you desire that the person suffer whatever temporal punishment is just.

This is, in fact, a proper use of anger. Anger is a passion, like fear, which means it can be used badly and well. Just as an unbalanced fear means either acting without the fear that should be necessary (and opening oneself to danger), so it is unbalanced to play the cowardly lion and fear everything. So with anger, it must be balanced.

That said, it is just that you wish them to suffer whatever is just. Every man is meant to be able to go directly to heaven. Purgatory is a safety net. To wish someone to suffer in Purgatory is not the same as wishing their damnation. The latter is a grave sin. However, to wish someone to suffer in Purgatory is to wish that they no correspond with the temporal punishment and penances in this life that can pay off their temporal punishment.

We can hope to at least make it to Purgatory, and we can wish others at least make it to Purgatory, but we cannot wish that they not go to heaven directly and instead have to suffer in Purgatory for as long as possible. This is a sin against Charity, because it is indirectly wishing that someone fail to correspond to the graces God is sending them to not need Purgatory.

It also implicitly undermines the idea of plenary indulgences. If one obtains a plenary indulgence, then all of his temporal punishment is gone. If a terribly evil man converts and does penance (like St Mary Magdalene), and obtains a plenary indulgence, to want him to suffer in Purgatory anyway would be to wish that he fall back into sin, which is a sin against Charity for you.

The balanced perspective is to wish that the person suffer whatever is necessary for their salvation and the good of others, in this life or in the next. To pray and sacrifice for their conversion and their salvation, help them pay back their debt by your sacrifices, and commend all of this to God and let him sort it out.
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#4
(03-29-2019, 09:28 AM)Augustinian Wrote: I would say hoping for Purgatory definitely stems from charity, while your desire for a long stay there might reflect a desire for justice. Remember that anger is not a sinful emotion, especially when there is injustice. It's your Christian duty to be outraged at sin and its effects. I would say your reaction is healthy.

Thank you, I appreciate your contribution to this thread.

(03-29-2019, 09:53 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: Firstly, to suffer a just punishment is a good thing, not an evil thing. It is evil to merit a punishment. That a murderer is executed for his crimes is a good thing (for him and for society). That he is worthy of such a punishment is a evil thing.

With that in mind, to want men who have merited a punishment to suffer that punishment is a good thing. You are wishing a good on them, and by this seeking the good of society. Not only is it good, but it is practicing several virtues : Charity (because you are wishing a good upon this person and society), Justice (because you are wanting to see this person and society receive what is due to each), Mercy (because seeing the harm done to this man's soul and society, you are wanting to relieve those harms) as well as specific parts of each of these.

Since God wants the soul of everyone, even the most wicked, to go to heaven, you must also desire this, even if you desire that the person suffer whatever temporal punishment is just.

This is, in fact, a proper use of anger. Anger is a passion, like fear, which means it can be used badly and well. Just as an unbalanced fear means either acting without the fear that should be necessary (and opening oneself to danger), so it is unbalanced to play the cowardly lion and fear everything. So with anger, it must be balanced.

That said, it is just that you wish them to suffer whatever is just. Every man is meant to be able to go directly to heaven. Purgatory is a safety net. To wish someone to suffer in Purgatory is not the same as wishing their damnation. The latter is a grave sin. However, to wish someone to suffer in Purgatory is to wish that they no correspond with the temporal punishment and penances in this life that can pay off their temporal punishment.

We can hope to at least make it to Purgatory, and we can wish others at least make it to Purgatory, but we cannot wish that they not go to heaven directly and instead have to suffer in Purgatory for as long as possible. This is a sin against Charity, because it is indirectly wishing that someone fail to correspond to the graces God is sending them to not need Purgatory.

It also implicitly undermines the idea of plenary indulgences. If one obtains a plenary indulgence, then all of his temporal punishment is gone. If a terribly evil man converts and does penance (like St Mary Magdalene), and obtains a plenary indulgence, to want him to suffer in Purgatory anyway would be to wish that he fall back into sin, which is a sin against Charity for you.

The balanced perspective is to wish that the person suffer whatever is necessary for their salvation and the good of others, in this life or in the next. To pray and sacrifice for their conversion and their salvation, help them pay back their debt by your sacrifices, and commend all of this to God and let him sort it out.

Your answers are always very thorough and helpful.  Thanks, MagisterMusicae! :)
"For the true friends of the people are neither revolutionaries nor innovators, but traditionalists."
- Pope St. Pius X

"For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables."
- 2 Timothy 4:3-4

"Therefore God shall send them the operation of error, to believe lying: That all may be judged who have not believed the truth, but have consented to iniquity."
- 2 Thessalonians 2:11-12
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