Conversion Process
#11
What Augustinian said. Plus, if you haven't already, check out the 'Being Catholic' page on the main FE website.
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#12
(03-30-2019, 09:32 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: What Augustinian said. Plus, if you haven't already, check out the 'Being Catholic' page on the main FE website.

I have and thanks for the answers.

My wife and I were going to start going through that together this evening actually but I browsed through it  last night.

I appreciate the effort that went into that.
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#13
(03-30-2019, 09:37 PM)Pathfinder Wrote:
(03-30-2019, 09:32 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: What Augustinian said. Plus, if you haven't already, check out the 'Being Catholic' page on the main FE website.

I have and thanks for the answers.

My wife and I were going to start going through that together this evening actually but I browsed through it  last night.

I appreciate the effort that went into that.

Maybe going through the old Baltimore Catechisms --  -- and then going through this page once without clicking the links -- and then going back over it, clicking on the links as you go might help you get a pretty solid understanding of the Faith and the problems you might find in the average parish, what you should be looking out for, etc.

You can definitely attend Mass any time (do all you can to find a traditional Latin Mass, commonly called "the Extraordinary Form" or "EF"), but don't receive Communion. When others go up to receive, just sit in the pew and you'll be fine. As to what to do at the Mass, just sit toward the back and follow the people in front of you. I promise you it will be fine, you won't stand out or anything (and there are pages on the FE site about the Mass, etiquette, etc.). After a few visits, things will click into place.
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#14
I've been meeting with the priest almost every weekend, since we go to a very small church that has no adult program for converts.  I honestly prefer it to a class setting, and my husband comes along with me as support.  There was a bunch of paperwork we had to go through to make sure we weren't like previously married or part of a secret society, etc.  Our one obstacle was that we were not married in a Catholic church (husband was not a practicing Catholic at the time).  I didn't know about the convalidation thing, but we're taking care of that right now.  In the meantime, we were asked to abstain from marital relations and live as "brother and Sister," treating it like a Lenten penance (apparently even some validly married couples practice this for Lent).  It was a bit of a shock.  Poor husband felt bad for not knowing about it.  However, I had done enough my own personal research for a couple years on the teachings of the church that I was determined to do whatever it took to get through the process.  This part is easy, actually.  The hard part will be how certain members of my family will react.  No one knows that I've finally bit the bullet yet.

~Lily~
I may wander, but I'm not lost!  :bee: 
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#15
(03-30-2019, 11:15 PM)JoyLily Wrote:  Our one obstacle was that we were not married in a Catholic church (husband was not a practicing Catholic at the time).  I didn't know about the convalidation thing, but we're taking care of that right now.

On a side note, I'm a little confused about convalidation. So I entered the Church a year ago, my wife and I were married in a civil union a couple years before that. While I am a Catholic, my wife is still an agnostic/atheist with an aversion to religion (she claims it makes her "uncomfortable" and "she doesn't care about that stuff"). My RCIA director said our marriage is acceptable in the eyes of the Church, but given my own research over the past year I've begun to question if it actually is...

If it isn't valid, I am going to go through hell to even try to convince my wife to agree to convalidation. Although, my confessor has expressed no concerns when I've brought marital relations to his attention.
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

Put not your trust in princes: In the children of men, in whom there is no salvation. - Ps. 145:2-3

"For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables." - 2 Timothy 4:3-4
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#16
(03-30-2019, 11:23 PM)Augustinian Wrote: On a side note, I'm a little confused about convalidation. So I entered the Church a year ago, my wife and I were married in a civil union a couple years before that. While I am a Catholic, my wife is still an agnostic/atheist with an aversion to religion (she claims it makes her "uncomfortable" and "she doesn't care about that stuff"). My RCIA director said our marriage is acceptable in the eyes of the Church, but given my own research over the past year I've begun to question if it actually is...

If you weren't Catholic when you married, a civil marriage is valid. It's not sacramental, though, since you aren't both baptised. And that assumes neither of you have been married before.
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#17
I've been through the RCIA process and my mother is currently in the last weeks of the program at our parish.  My own experience is that it was not really burdensome.  I didn't mind the once a week class that ran from September to my baptism and confirmation the following Spring.  However, I was also a 19-year-old college student at the time, so maybe it seemed more or less like other classes that I was taking at the time.  My mother's experience has been different.  I've attended all the classes with her.  For the first half of the program, she was able to attend the classes at our own parish.  Then, for the last half of the classes, I've had to drive her to a parish in a neighboring town (during some lousy winter weather and the sometimes dangerous road conditions).  Why?  Because both parishes have had the same priest for a number of years and so they've decided, after having separate programs for years, to integrate them into one single program for both parishes.  Its been kind of inconvenient, especially since they have not planned out the integrated program in advance but seem to make decisions about when they'll be doing this or that part of the process and the many details involved about a week or so beforehand. 

It's not all bad, though, and there have been a number of positives.  For the most part, I've found that the instructors are conservative NO types and seem to present the Faith as accurately as one can hope for an NO parish.  Our priest is also very involved in the process and, while not always teaching the class, has been present at most of them, answering questions, etc.  The most inconvenient parts for my mother have been the travel involved and the length of time required.  She has stuck with it, though, because I sat down with her before the program started (actually, before she decided to convert) and went over Scriptural proofs for the Papacy and the Church, helping her to realize that Our Lord founded His Church on St. Peter as the Rock and that this Church is the Catholic Church.  We also went over extra Ecclesiam nulla salus, which she was able to understand pretty well for someone who just months before had been skeptical that the Catholic Church was even really Christian.  So, she has known from the start that, however inconvenient it has been, it is important to follow through and join the Church.  Whether changes should be made, I can't say for sure.  Not everyone needs to attend these classes for nearly a year, while others might need such preparation.  Maybe a program based more on where each potential convert is at in their knowledge of the Faith and their own faith and spiritual development might be a good idea.
"For the true friends of the people are neither revolutionaries nor innovators, but traditionalists."
- Pope St. Pius X

"For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables."
- 2 Timothy 4:3-4

"Therefore God shall send them the operation of error, to believe lying: That all may be judged who have not believed the truth, but have consented to iniquity."
- 2 Thessalonians 2:11-12
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#18
I did RCIA almost two full times. Length was not bad - but content was terrible. Headed by a liberal deacon, I couldn't expect to much I guess.

It was boring, and dry, and not concerned with the individuals themselves hardly at all. Run them thru the institution mill, get out the rubber stamp - next.

That this the theme of my whole dioceses however. I try to post less, as I don't have much good to post about the Church where I am.
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#19
My RCIA went through the full gamut of questions a person could ask, from "Why should I believe in God?" to the more specific elements of Catholicism. We had, to my knowledge, two reference books, met weekly, and sometimes watched video clips. The man who headed our RCIA later became a permanent deacon. When we finished, we got a box of items, including a "How to pray the Rosary" booklet, a Rosary, a pocket New Testament (Confraternity Bible), holy water, and I think there were other things that I can't recall.

Mine was solid, thank goodness.
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#20
RCIA I believe is a automated conversion process that does a disservice to the Faith and the Faithful. Its treated more like a "check the box" type class and at the end you get to graduate. THis is the wrong thinking to take.

I think a better avenue to take would be anyone who is wanting to convert to the Catholic Church meets with the Priest. THe Priest speaks to them and gauges their interest and their knowledge about the faith. After speaking with the Priest initially, and the Priest judges their interest genuine, should be baptized immediately. Then he assigns an experienced Parishioner who has brought up children in the faith using orthodox means such as the Baltimore Catechism or Catechism of St. Pius X. They are to meet with that Parishioner for instruction, and occasional meals with the Parishioner and their family to see how the faith is lived practically. Perhaps even having the Parishioners children involved in helping this person learn the faith as well. The Parishioner and the Convert meet with the Priest periodically to determine where they are at. When they have reached a sufficient milestone in their education in the faith, they receive the Sacraments of Reconciliation, Eucharist, and Confirmation.
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