St. Isidore of Seville and the internet
#1
I know I'm a day late for St. Isidore's feast, but here's some wisdom from Fr. Z's blog on the *unofficial* patron saint of the internet, St. Isidore of Seville (which inspired me to change my avatar to him).
I think we could all use the extra grace in our online interactions with non-Catholics or even fellow Catholics in these times of strife.

http://wdtprs.com/blog/2019/04/4-april-s...r-and-you/

Quote:I often forget to pray before using the internet. I sometimes fail in charity when using the internet.
This tool of social communication and research and entertainment has amazing upsides, but it also has spiritually deadly perils. We all should be very careful in how we use it – and through it – use each other, “use” in the finer sense of “treat” each other.
Today is the feast of St. Isidore of Seville, Bishop and Doctor (+4 April 636). He is not to be confused with St. Isidore the Farmer.
St. Isidore defended the faith against the Arian heresy, which was still around. It is amazing how tenacious heresy can be.  It still is around.
Some years ago there was chat about having St. Isidore proposed as the patron saint of the internet. He has NOT, however, officially been named such. Keep that in mind.
I was asked to write a prayer people could recite before using the internet. I wrote the prayer in Latin and submitted it, with a translation into English, to a bishop who gave it his approval.
This prayer is now all over the same internet (both with and without attribution!).
You will want to know why some people proposed St. Isidore for this role.

St. Isidore’s most notable work, the Etymologiae, us a massive encyclopedic work of 448 chapters in 20 volumes indexing just about everything people thought it was important to know at the time, rather like a primitive database.  I think that’s the connection.
You can, of course, pray to any saint in this matter, and nothing official about any patron for the internet has been handed down from the Congregation for the Causes of Saints (which is the competent dicastery of the Holy See in those matters).
Bottom line: people wanted a prayer for St. Isidore, and I wrote one. You should feel free to change the name to whatever saint you prefer. Others have proposed St. Maximilian Kolbe (+1941), St. Bernadine of Siena (+1444), St. Rita of Cascia (+1457), and the Archangel Gabriel (still around).
I am happy for people to use this prayer. I ask that you give attribution.
To see all the versions of the prayer which are now available, go

HERE

If you can offer a new translation (and audio recording by a native speaker) into a language missing from those I’ve archived, please send it. To email me, click HERE.

I would also like a video of the prayer in ASL, American Sign Language.

Meanwhile, here is the English.

A prayer before logging onto the internet:

Quote:Almighty and eternal God, who created us in Thine image and bade us to seek after all that is good, true and beautiful, especially in the divine person of Thine Only-begotten Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, grant, we beseech Thee, that, through the intercession of Saint Isidore, Bishop and Doctor, during our journeys through the internet we will direct our hands and eyes only to that which is pleasing to Thee and treat with charity and patience all those souls whom we encounter. Through Christ our Lord.   Amen.
Finally, I’m still waiting for an improved version in Klingon.
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

Put not your trust in princes: In the children of men, in whom there is no salvation. - Ps. 145:2-3

"For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables." - 2 Timothy 4:3-4
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#2
(04-05-2019, 05:54 PM)Augustinian Wrote: I know I'm a day late for St. Isidore's feast, but here's some wisdom from Fr. Z's blog on the *unofficial* patron saint of the internet, St. Isidore of Seville (which inspired me to change my avatar to him).
I think we could all use the extra grace in our online interactions with non-Catholics or even fellow Catholics in these times of strife.

http://wdtprs.com/blog/2019/04/4-april-s...r-and-you/

Quote:I often forget to pray before using the internet. I sometimes fail in charity when using the internet.
This tool of social communication and research and entertainment has amazing upsides, but it also has spiritually deadly perils. We all should be very careful in how we use it – and through it – use each other, “use” in the finer sense of “treat” each other.
Today is the feast of St. Isidore of Seville, Bishop and Doctor (+4 April 636). He is not to be confused with St. Isidore the Farmer.
St. Isidore defended the faith against the Arian heresy, which was still around. It is amazing how tenacious heresy can be.  It still is around.
Some years ago there was chat about having St. Isidore proposed as the patron saint of the internet. He has NOT, however, officially been named such. Keep that in mind.
I was asked to write a prayer people could recite before using the internet. I wrote the prayer in Latin and submitted it, with a translation into English, to a bishop who gave it his approval.
This prayer is now all over the same internet (both with and without attribution!).
You will want to know why some people proposed St. Isidore for this role.

St. Isidore’s most notable work, the Etymologiae, us a massive encyclopedic work of 448 chapters in 20 volumes indexing just about everything people thought it was important to know at the time, rather like a primitive database.  I think that’s the connection.
You can, of course, pray to any saint in this matter, and nothing official about any patron for the internet has been handed down from the Congregation for the Causes of Saints (which is the competent dicastery of the Holy See in those matters).
Bottom line: people wanted a prayer for St. Isidore, and I wrote one. You should feel free to change the name to whatever saint you prefer. Others have proposed St. Maximilian Kolbe (+1941), St. Bernadine of Siena (+1444), St. Rita of Cascia (+1457), and the Archangel Gabriel (still around).
I am happy for people to use this prayer. I ask that you give attribution.
To see all the versions of the prayer which are now available, go

HERE

If you can offer a new translation (and audio recording by a native speaker) into a language missing from those I’ve archived, please send it. To email me, click HERE.

I would also like a video of the prayer in ASL, American Sign Language.

Meanwhile, here is the English.

A prayer before logging onto the internet:

Quote:Almighty and eternal God, who created us in Thine image and bade us to seek after all that is good, true and beautiful, especially in the divine person of Thine Only-begotten Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, grant, we beseech Thee, that, through the intercession of Saint Isidore, Bishop and Doctor, during our journeys through the internet we will direct our hands and eyes only to that which is pleasing to Thee and treat with charity and patience all those souls whom we encounter. Through Christ our Lord.   Amen.
Finally, I’m still waiting for an improved version in Klingon.

Thanks for this.  I used to have the good saint's prayer card above my monitor, but it migrated to my daughter's room somehow.  Anyway, she is about to enter her third year of ASL in high school, so I'll see if she's interested in tackling the video translation.
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#3
Yes, St. Isidore was a great Saint, and imho, he's sometimes underappreciated today, but in the Middle Ages, he was widely venerated. St. Isidore mastered all of Hebrew, Greek and Latin in such a short time, which many felt to be miraculous. The Councils of Toledo praise St. Isidore in glowing words, as the CE relates, "He was undoubtedly the most learned man of his age and exercised a far-reaching and immeasurable influence on the educational life of the Middle Ages. His contemporary and friend, Braulio, Bishop of Saragossa, regarded him as a man raised up by God to save the Spanish people from the tidal wave of barbarism that threatened to inundate the ancient civilization of Spain, The Eighth Council of Toledo (653) recorded its admiration of his character in these glowing terms: "The extraordinary Doctor, the latest ornament of the Catholic Church, the most learned man of the latter ages, always to be named with reverence, Isidore". This tribute was endorsed by the Fifteenth Council of Toledo, held in 688." http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08186a.htm

One of St. Isidore's great accomplishments was synthesizing all fields of learning that were in any way true or good or useful to Christianity and humanity, and discarding all the rest that was corrupted by heathenism or other such errors, especially in Etymologiae. As New advent puts it: "As a writer, Isidore was prolific and versatile to an extraordinary degree. His voluminous writings may be truly said to constitute the first chapter of Spanish literature ... The most important and by far the best-known of all his writings is the "Etymologiae", or "Origines", as it is sometimes called. This work takes its name from the subject-matter of one of its constituent books. It was written shortly before his death, in the full maturity of his wonderful scholarship, at the request. of his friend Braulio, Bishop of Saragossa. It is a vast storehouse in which is gathered, systematized, and condensed, all the learning possessed by his time. Throughout the greater part of the Middle Ages it was the textbook most in use in educational institutions. So highly was it regarded as a depository of classical learning that in a great measure, it superseded the use of the individual works of the classics themselves. Not even the Renaissance seemed to diminish the high esteem in which it was held, and according to Arévalo, it was printed ten times between 1470 and 1529. Besides these numerous reprints, the popularity of the "Etymologiae" gave rise to many inferior imitations. It furnishes, abundant evidence that the writer possessed a most intimate knowledge of the Greek and Latin poets. In all, he quotes from one hundred and fifty-four authors, Christian and pagan. Many of these he had read in the originals and the others he consulted in current compilations. In style this encyclopedic work is concise and clear and in order, admirable."

He also did much to support religious life and the seminaries in his dioceses. Truly, an extraordinary Saint and a man raised up by God for His Church. Archbishop St. Isidore of Seville, pray for us.
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