Mass in Latin?
#11
(04-10-2019, 10:24 PM)Augustinian Wrote: Off the top of my head, it has to do with the standardization of the Mass after the Council of Trent, when the Roman Rite was established as the standard rite to be celebrated in the Church. And since the Roman rite is traditionally in Latin, as well as Latin being the official ecclesiastical language, that is why its usage is seen as the norm.
There are various other rites since the dawn of Christianity that use different languages, such as the Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom being presented in the common vernacular of the region as you find in Eastern Catholicism and Orthodoxy.


Thanks. So it was not done in Latin universally until Trent?
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#12
It was done in Latin universally in the West, from the first century.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

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#13
(04-11-2019, 05:36 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: It was done in Latin universally in the West, from the first century.

I might be wrong, but I remember reading (perhaps it was Fortesque, or maybe Sire's book I really cannot remember) that the mass was in Greek up until the time of Augustine and Pope Damasus.
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#14
Refer to post number 8, above.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
“Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'
FishEaters Group on MeWe
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