Catechism of Trent?
#1
Is it just me, or does the paperback, green CCC they gave me at confirmation seem a little watered-down?

I have heard about this Catechism of Trent and want to know exactly what it is. Is it the catechism they used before VII? Are the teachings in it still to be followed or are they now null and void thanks to the new CCC?


St. Mary of Egypt, Ora Pro Nobis!







Reply
#2
We should be careful to clarify what a catechism is: a catechism is an educational summary of (important parts of) the faith, not a source of authority in itself. The use often made of St. John Paul II's Catechism of the Catholic Church has tended to give it a different role to previous catechisms as a sort of final word in the adjudication of disputes, but this is largely a mistake, as Cardinal Ratzinger made clear at the time of its composition. So it's probably best not to think in terms of the Catechism, but rather different efforts to summarise the teachings of the Church, which succeed to greater or lesser degrees.

The Catechism of Trent was one of many educational texts in use before VII (some others that people still use: the Catechism of St. Pius X, the Baltimore Catechism, the Shorter Catechism of St. Robert Bellarmine...). It has the advantage of being composed at the command of the Council of Trent, though it's worth clarifying that the text itself wasn't formally approved by the Council—since it was finished after it had already ended—so it isn't, technically, an authoritative pronouncement by the Council like its Canons. You'll also notice on reading it that its structure is much more narrowly focused than John Paul's CCC: it strictly follows the Apostles' Creed, the Seven Sacraments, the Ten Commandments, and the Lord's Prayer, commenting on each item within these.

So, with that background, to answer your questions: Yes, the Catechism of Trent was in wide use before VII and recommended by many popes up to the 20th century. No, it has never been suppressed or superseded. You will benefit from reading it.
[-] The following 2 users Like Telecreon's post:
  • In His Love, SaintSebastian
Reply
#3
(04-16-2019, 12:35 PM)Telecreon Wrote: So, with that background, to answer your questions: Yes, the Catechism of Trent was in wide use before VII and recommended by many popes up to the 20th century. No, it has never been suppressed or superseded. You will benefit from reading it.

Especially the passages referring to the 'marriage debt.'  Wink
[-] The following 1 user Likes Bonaventure's post:
  • SacraCor714
Reply
#4
The "Catechism of Trent" or "Roman Catechism" was ordered by the Council of Trent to guide priests in their preaching.  

Here it is online:
http://www.catholicapologetics.info/thec...trentc.htm

Even if not originally designed for laity to use as a reference, I still think it's great for that purpose.  It's a lot more compact than the CCC--I wouldn't say that is so much watered down as almost overly comprehensive--it can be a slog, even finding what you're looking for (the CCC itself cites from the Roman Catechism extensively).  The CCC was primarily designed for bishops to then develop more simple Catechisms, but I don't think much of value came of that.

The creation of a simple Catechism for the laity was proposed at the First Vatican Council.  Due to being cut short by the  usurpation of Rome, like various other things proposed at that Council, it was taken up by subsequent Popes.  The Catechism of St. Pius X is its realization, although it sadly did not spread as wide as had been hoped and was pretty much just used in Italy.

https://www.ewtn.com/library/CATECHSM/PIUSXCAT.HTM
[Image: catherinesiena-1.jpg]
[-] The following 1 user Likes SaintSebastian's post:
  • MagisterMusicae
Reply
#5
And, here you go! The Catechism of Trent.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


[-] The following 1 user Likes jovan66102's post:
  • In His Love
Reply
#6
If you want a good, concise, question and answer format catechism, I recommend the Penny Catechism. You can buy it on The Catholic Company’s website for very little money.
Reply
#7
Penny Catechism
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


[-] The following 1 user Likes jovan66102's post:
  • In His Love
Reply
#8
(04-16-2019, 03:10 PM)SaintSebastian Wrote: The "Catechism of Trent" or "Roman Catechism" was ordered by the Council of Trent to guide priests in their preaching.  

I think this is an important point.

It was never intended for use by the laity as such, and this is why you find things like the Baltimore Catechism which was drawn up by the Council of Baltimore for the purpose of providing the faithful with an instructional summary. The Roman Catechism is not therefore, primarily meant as a teaching tool for the faithful, but a reference for priests and those who have to teach the faith. 

As a result, those who are not firstly trained in theology will have some difficulties in properly understanding some aspects of it, and will be ignorant of some of the theological background which is not provided in the Tridentine Catechism. In short, there is no single book that outlines in precise detail everything that the Church teaches, and all of the various theological opinions.

To say, however, as telecron has, that a Catechism is an educational summary and not a source of authority is true, but that is not what the Tridentine Catechism is. It is meant to be such a source, because that was the intention. It is an incomplete source, but a summary for those who are meant to be the teachers, and thus an authoritative source. The Catechisms meant for the faithful are more properly called this "educational summary" which in themselves are not meant to be an authority in themselves.

The Roman Catechism is meant to be more of an authority on doctrinal matters (and can be quoted as such), since it was meant to be a point-by-point guide for priests to use in systematic preaching of the Faith to the faithful.

The CCC was, in fact, meant to be precisely a new replacement for the Roman Catechism, to found religious teaching authority upon a man-centered approach just like the Novus Ordo was a novel replacement for the Mass, meant to found worship on a man-centered approach.
[-] The following 2 users Like MagisterMusicae's post:
  • CaptCrunch73, jovan66102
Reply
#9
You can find the Catechism of Trent (and the Baltimore Catechisms) here: https://fisheaters.com/catholiclibrary.html
T h e   D u d e t t e   A b i d e s
[-] The following 3 users Like VoxClamantis's post:
  • Bonaventure, CaptCrunch73, In His Love
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)