Vox's recent tweet.
#41
(09-30-2020, 01:30 AM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(09-29-2020, 10:56 PM)Renee Thérèse13 Wrote: Where are the files? I can not seem to find them at all..

She meant the main site: https://www.fisheaters.com/

It's an absolute treasure trove of information about the Faith. Heck, it even has recipes for traditional dishes for feastdays, like Michaelmas goose.


Hmm must be missing over it, can't find recipes
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#42
Look for major feast days. Christmas, Easter, Pentecost, St Michael's Day, etc. After an explanation of the feast, the readings from the Liturgy for the day, etc. there'll be a section on customs. It often has recipes that are traditionally prepared for the feast day meal.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
“Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'
FishEaters Group on MeWe
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#43
For instance, here are the recipes from the St Michael's Day page:

As to foods, geese were, at least at one time, plentiful during this time of year, so roast goose dinners are traditional (eating them on this day is said to protect against financial hardship, according to Irish and English folk belief). It was also the time (at least in Ireland) when the fishing season ended, the hunting season began, and apples were harvested, so eating apples today with that goose would be a nice touch.
Quote:
Roast Goose with Apples (serves 8)

1 13-lb. goose, giblets and neck discarded (you'll need 1 lb per person)
3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
8 golden delicious apples, peeled, each cut into 6 wedges
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
6 TBSP sugar
1/4 cup calvados (apple brandy)
1 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

Position rack in bottom third of oven and preheat to 350°F. Rinse goose inside and out; pat dry with paper towels. Sprinkle inside and out with salt and pepper. Using knife, cut small slits all over goose; place garlic slices into slits. Place goose on rack, breast side down, in large roasting pan. Roast goose 2 hours 45 minutes, basting occasionally with drippings and removing excess fat; reserve 6 tablespoons fat. Turn goose over. Roast until brown and thermometer inserted into thickest part of thigh registers 175°F, basting occasionally with drippings, about 45 minutes longer. Meanwhile, toss apples and lemon juice in large bowl. Pour 6 tablespoons goose fat into 15 x 10 x 2-inch glass baking dish. Using slotted spoon, transfer apples to baking dish; toss apples in goose fat. Add sugar, Calvados and cinnamon to apples; toss. Bake apples alongside goose until very tender and golden, about 1 hour. Serve goose with caramelized apples and a Bordeaux wine.
When you cut up your apples, cross-section a few and show your children how the 5 seeds inside the 5-pointed star found inside represent the Five Wounds of Christ. Another fun thing to do with apples is to make those little apple dolls that always resemble old people: [Image: cleardot.gif]
Quote:
Apple Dolls

Peel an apple (Granny Smith or Golden Delicious apples work well), cutting away any bruises (some people say to core the apple, others say not to. Experiment for yourself). Carve as life-like a face as possible into the apple (don't cut too deeply so as to avoid rotting). Don't forget the little things that make a face so human -- the little lines running from nose to mouth, the hollows of the eyes, the depressions caused by cheekbones, etc. Depending on the "skin" tone desired, soak the carved apple for about 45 minutes in a mixture of lemon juice (or cider vinegar) and water (the longer you soak, the lighter the "skin" tone will be).

Hang the apple up in the dryest, darkest room of your home. Come back in 3 to 4 weeks to see what you have (Hallowe'en would be perfect time for the unveiling if these are made on Michaelmas). It should have shrunk by about two thirds its original size, darkened some, and show the wizened features of an old woman or man. When thoroughly dry, decorate using very diluted food colorings for rouge; corn silk, cotton, or yarn for hair; cloves or food colorings for eyes; fabric triangles for scarves, etc. Secure onto a "body" made of a bottle, styrofoam cone, wooden dowel, etc., and make clothes as desired.
[Image: apples22.gif]
For the Irish, the next food du jour is St. Michael's Bannock, a scone-like bread, cooked in a frying pan.
Quote:
St. Michael's Bannock

1 1/3 C. barley flour
1 1/3 C. oat meal
1 1/3 C. rye meal
1 C. flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 scant tsp baking soda
2 1/2-3 C. buttermilk
3 TBSP honey or brown sugar
2 eggs
1 C. cream
4 TBSP melted butter

Mix the barley flour, oat meal, and rye meal. Add flour and salt. Mix the soda and buttermilk (start with the 2 1/2 C) and then add to the dry mixture. Stir in honey. Turn out onto floured board and mix (as with all breads, don't over-mix), adding more buttermilk if too dry, or more flour if too sticky).

Divide dough in half, and roll each, on a floured board, into an 8" circle (about 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch thick). While heating a lightly greased skillet, mix the eggs, cream, and melted butter. Spread onto one of the bannocks and place the bannock, egg-side down, in the skillet and cook til the egg-side is browned. Put the egg mixture on the top side, flip the bannock and cook 'til the second side is golden. Repeat this application of the egg wash and flipping and cooking until each side has been cooked three times. Do the same with the second bannock. Serve warm with butter and honey.
According to an old Irish folk tale, blackberries were supposed to have been harvested and used up by this date, too, since it is told to children that when Satan was kicked out of Heaven, he landed in a bramble patch -- and returns each year to curse and spit on the fruits of the plant he landed on, rendering them inedible thereafter. So a dessert with blackberries would be perfect.
Quote:
Blackberry Crumble

6 cups fresh blackberries
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
2/3 cup old-fashioned oats
1/2 cup dark brown sugar
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
3 tbsp butter, softened
1 tbsp vegetable oil
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp table salt

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. In a large bowl, gently combine blackberries, 1/3 c. granulated sugar and 1/3 c. all-purpose flour. Transfer to an 8 x 8 baking dish. For the crumble topping, combine remaining ingredients in a medium bowl and work together with your hands until the ingredients resemble a crumble. Sprinkle over the blackberry mixture. Bake crumble until the the topping is golden brown and blackberries are bubbling, about 40 minutes. Let cool for 15 minutes before serving. Serve warm or at room temperature, with ice cream if desired.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
“Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'
FishEaters Group on MeWe
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#44
Oh the goose sounds soooo good
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#45
Old thread but I just subscribed to thank Vox for her work. Found you by Divine Providence while looking for personality tests, your site is one of many gifts who started me on the path to conversion and repentance.

I thank you from the bottomest of my heart and will pray for you (and donate).
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#46
Quote:I thank you from the bottomest of my heart and will pray for you (and donate).
 

Thanks, houseonarock. It means a lot.
T h e   D u d e t t e   A b i d e s
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#47
(10-07-2020, 12:59 PM)VoxClamantis Wrote:
Quote:I thank you from the bottomest of my heart and will pray for you (and donate).
 

Thanks, houseonarock. It means a lot.

I'm new here, and in the process of converting. (Attending RCIA at a NO parish and attending Mass at a TLM parish out of town.)
I just wanted to say thank you so much for everything you've done here. I'm going to be downloading every single thing I can from this site and keeping it on an external hard drive in case anything ever happened to it. This is such an incredible deposit of our Faith and you should be so proud of yourself for the info here, as well as the eloquent and cheerful way that you present it. Please don't ever stop. Thank you so much!
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#48
Muffinman145, thanks. I really can't tell people how MUCH hearing such things means. I tend to get periodically very discouraged and feel like giving up b/c of the lack of support and links and all that sort of thing, all of which can make me feel as if I'm wasting my time. But then I get insanely nice emails (I store them in a folder called "Love Notes" so I can re-read them once in a while), and posts like yours, and it buoys me up for another round.

I got a PM recently from someone who wrote a long, gorgeous note that included this:


Quote:I tell you this, not just to give you my biography, but to let you know that Fisheaters has played a HUGE role in my very slow evolution to traditional Mass.  And it has not impacted not just myself, but my husband and the six of my seven daughter that are still living at home.  That is 8 people just here.  I also talked to another homeschool Mom and she and her family are making the switch as well. They are a family of 7. You may not see tangible numbers in your ministry, but you are making an impact.  I will do my part and remember to share your site with those that I meet.  Finances are tight right now but I will see if we can help financially as well. I would hate to see this site come down. I have been drawn to it on and off for a decade.  
 

I can live emotionally off of that for the rest of the year! (Just to note, though: I don't think of what I do as a "ministry" -- a word I associate with folks who have authority, which I don't -- but a "personal mission"). 

(Also note, I don't want financial support from people like the above -- e.g., folks of average means who have six kids living at home. I'm not starving yet or anything!)

So, again: thanks.
T h e   D u d e t t e   A b i d e s
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#49
(10-19-2020, 01:04 AM)VoxClamantis Wrote: Muffinman145, thanks. I really can't tell people how MUCH hearing such things means. I tend to get periodically very discouraged and feel like giving up b/c of the lack of support and links and all that sort of thing, all of which can make me feel as if I'm wasting my time. But then I get insanely nice emails (I store them in a folder called "Love Notes" so I can re-read them once in a while), and posts like yours, and it buoys me up for another round.

I got a PM recently from someone who wrote a long, gorgeous note that included this:


Quote:I tell you this, not just to give you my biography, but to let you know that Fisheaters has played a HUGE role in my very slow evolution to traditional Mass.  And it has not impacted not just myself, but my husband and the six of my seven daughter that are still living at home.  That is 8 people just here.  I also talked to another homeschool Mom and she and her family are making the switch as well. They are a family of 7. You may not see tangible numbers in your ministry, but you are making an impact.  I will do my part and remember to share your site with those that I meet.  Finances are tight right now but I will see if we can help financially as well. I would hate to see this site come down. I have been drawn to it on and off for a decade.  
 

I can live emotionally off of that for the rest of the year! (Just to note, though: I don't think of what I do as a "ministry" -- a word I associate with folks who have authority, which I don't -- but a "personal mission"). 

(Also note, I don't want financial support from people like the above -- e.g., folks of average means who have six kids living at home. I'm not starving yet or anything!)

So, again: thanks.

I appreciate the company of the people here, even though I am not Catholic. I hope God continues to bless us with people like you.
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#50
First post on here, though have been acquainted with this site and forum for a bit. An older thread but wanted to still share my story a little, hope that helps you Vox.

I have been a professional lurker on here for the last about 5 or 6 years (time flies). Had gotten into debates with my girlfriend (now wife) about religion and theology, and was unable to answer her. This started a long rabbit path of going from NO based understanding of the faith to learning there was a church before the 60's, that there was this amazing thing called the Summa Theologica, etc. It was during this time I stumbled onto your website for the first time. It opened my eyes alot to just how narrow my view/understanding of the faith was, that there was far more to it then what I had been taught. I would read and re-read alot of the content, look at the forums a bit, and soak it all in.

Life happens, married, kids, moved to a few states and started a career. Upon moving back to the midwest and finally in a state that has more then just one TLM full time (Sorry Utah, beautiful place by far but not the most welcoming when it comes to Catholics), I am once again getting into active faith discussions, this time family and a number of friends, bringing me back to this site.

As I have a growing passion now for the faith, and want to see it spread in my immediate area and beyond, I plan on being a semi- active member of the forums and will utilize the material on the main page alot. Father of two young daughter, a job and most importantly a wife, will be on when I can.

Thank you for the website, has helped myself and my wife alot in our faith journey, and we are utilizing it as an aid for others.
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