Is there any sin in taking someone else’s medication?
#11
I they are prescribed to you, some spiritual writers have said that it is your moral duty to follow the directives of your physician to the letter.

We must always exercise prudence in everything, however. That is my view.
"He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom."

                             -Gandalf the Grey
Reply
#12
(05-18-2019, 12:28 PM)FultonFan Wrote: It does help, thank you very much.
How about medications taken as prescribed for certain conditions?

I sincerely hope this doesn't sound rude, but this proves my point.

Your initial question, your "itch," was, "Is there any sin in taking someone else's medication?" Someone scratched that itch, and it became, "How about medications taken as prescribed for certain conditions?" This is not a question that a non-scrupulous mind would ask, because of course there is no harm in taking a medication your doctor prescribes for a valid health condition. You would not tell someone suffering from a heart condition not to take his Bayer. You would not tell someone with chronic headaches not to take her Tylenol.

Scruples are not content with these kinds of answers, so more questions will come, and more answers will come, and more questions will come, until you decide to take it up with a confessor and stick to the advice he gives you. You cannot, I repeat, cannot give scrupulosity any measure of what it wants. It does not help. It serves to make your brain ill for a longer period of time and trapped in an endless cycle.

God is not a tyrant or a dictator. He took on flesh and dwelt among us for love of you. He gave you His Mother from the cross, and then He died on that cross for you. He gave His last drop of blood for you. He went to prepare a place for you in Heaven. He waits for you in the Eucharist. He waits for you to pray to Him. He makes you more receptive to grace through sacramentals. He gives you grace in the Sacraments. He has done everything possible to prove His love. 

I repeat, please seek help.

God bless.
[-] The following 2 users Like In His Love's post:
  • jovan66102, MagisterMusicae
Reply
#13
(05-18-2019, 03:13 PM)In His Love Wrote:
(05-18-2019, 12:28 PM)FultonFan Wrote: It does help, thank you very much.
How about medications taken as prescribed for certain conditions?

I sincerely hope this doesn't sound rude, but this proves my point.

Your initial question, your "itch," was, "Is there any sin in taking someone else's medication?" Someone scratched that itch, and it became, "How about medications taken as prescribed for certain conditions?" This is not a question that a non-scrupulous mind would ask, because of course there is no harm in taking a medication your doctor prescribes for a valid health condition. You would not tell someone suffering from a heart condition not to take his Bayer. You would not tell someone with chronic headaches not to take her Tylenol.

Scruples are not content with these kinds of answers, so more questions will come, and more answers will come, and more questions will come, until you decide to take it up with a confessor and stick to the advice he gives you. You cannot, I repeat, cannot give scrupulosity any measure of what it wants. It does not help. It serves to make your brain ill for a longer period of time and trapped in an endless cycle.

God is not a tyrant or a dictator. He took on flesh and dwelt among us for love of you. He gave you His Mother from the cross, and then He died on that cross for you. He gave His last drop of blood for you. He went to prepare a place for you in Heaven. He waits for you in the Eucharist. He waits for you to pray to Him. He makes you more receptive to grace through sacramentals. He gives you grace in the Sacraments. He has done everything possible to prove His love. 

I repeat, please seek help.

God bless.

Good point.
"He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom."

                             -Gandalf the Grey
Reply
#14
(05-16-2019, 09:45 PM)FultonFan Wrote: Thanks all. 
I’ll stop this!

Then DO! (See post #10)
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
  “Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog also.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'


[-] The following 1 user Likes jovan66102's post:
  • In His Love
Reply
#15
(05-18-2019, 11:59 AM)Telchar Wrote: I have done this before with the permission and invitation of the holder of the prescription.  It is not a sin.

For the taking of any medication to be a sin, the following conditions have to be met:

1. It has to be reckless and uninformed.  Any medication, especially prescription medication, can really do harm to your body.  You should always consider this well.

2. It has to be for the wrong reason.

As long as you can be reasonably certain that you are not going to harm yourself by taking medication, then you should take it if you need it.

If you don't have a good reason to take medication, then you should not.

If you ever find yourself taking medication to feel better habitually, without any good reason for doing so, then you are sinning.  That's the only time it is a sin.  Same thing goes for alcohol.

Reasonable usage is not the same as appetite driven abuse.

Does that help at all?

And what qualification do you have to advise people on moral theology?
[-] The following 1 user Likes MagisterMusicae's post:
  • jovan66102
Reply
#16
(05-16-2019, 08:49 PM)josh987654321 Wrote:
(05-16-2019, 06:33 PM)FultonFan Wrote: I took someone else’s Anaprox for a headache.
That’s prescription only.
Is there any sin in that?

Also not a good idea to take other peoples prescriptions, as perhaps they could have dangerous side effects on you, hence why they are prescription for said people.

God Bless You

Yeah...I can vouch for this. I did this last spring and wound up in the ER.
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

'And he shall be as a tree that is planted by the waters, that spreadeth out its roots towards moisture: and it shall not fear when the heat cometh.' - Jeremias 17:8

[Image: 180px-SA_160-Jeremia_op_de_puinhopen_van_Jeruzalem.jpg]
Reply
#17
(05-19-2019, 01:25 AM)MagisterMusicae Wrote:
(05-18-2019, 11:59 AM)Telchar Wrote: I have done this before with the permission and invitation of the holder of the prescription.  It is not a sin.

For the taking of any medication to be a sin, the following conditions have to be met:

1. It has to be reckless and uninformed.  Any medication, especially prescription medication, can really do harm to your body.  You should always consider this well.

2. It has to be for the wrong reason.

As long as you can be reasonably certain that you are not going to harm yourself by taking medication, then you should take it if you need it.

If you don't have a good reason to take medication, then you should not.

If you ever find yourself taking medication to feel better habitually, without any good reason for doing so, then you are sinning.  That's the only time it is a sin.  Same thing goes for alcohol.

Reasonable usage is not the same as appetite driven abuse.

Does that help at all?

And what qualification do you have to advise people on moral theology?

None.  People can take my  advice or leave it. I know for a fact that I'm a reasonably well-informed individual on a variety of topics, and I try to be careful. That's the best we can do now.

Is there some trustworthy Catholic moral theology certification that you know of?  If so, please do advise me because you speak as though there is such a thing nowadays. Unless, of course, you think you're qualified to pass judgment on what constitutes trustworthy moral advice and trustworthy living experts.  In which case, what makes you qualified to do that?
"He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom."

                             -Gandalf the Grey
Reply
#18
(05-19-2019, 04:54 PM)Telchar Wrote: People can take my  advice or leave it.  I know for a fact that I'm a reasonably well-informed individual on a variety of topics, and I try to be careful.  That's the best we can do now.

Problem is that when we give advice, we participate in (indirectly) and influence the the decisions of others. We become in a certain degree responsible for their sins. It's not just case we have to use, but extreme care.

I'd suggest that after a slew of posts suggesting that the OP has some issues of a scrupulous conscience, to swoop in and declare "not a sin" is not "careful".

(05-19-2019, 04:54 PM)Telchar Wrote: Is there some trustworthy Catholic moral theology certification that you know of?  If so, please do advise me because you speak as though there is such a thing nowadays.

Generally, traditional priests are trustworthy resources, and those that have studied in a formal way moral theology or ethics.

Any ethicist who is trained in Scholastic ethics can generally be trusted. That includes laymen as well, who are so trained. There are still good moral theologians in the Church today, but it's not like all are, especially those who have not had classical training, since many are trained in situational ethics, or a shifting morality.

(05-19-2019, 04:54 PM)Telchar Wrote: Unless, of course, you think you're qualified to pass judgment on what constitutes trustworthy moral advice and trustworthy living experts.  In which case, what makes you qualified to do that?

I'm no expert, nor would I claim to be the "resident moral theologian" here (I think forums like this are bad places to hash out moral theology questions), but I did pass three years of moral theology in a traditional seminary, so I'd say I'm more qualified than most. Also, with a 13 year track record here, I think people could easily investigate if I've written anything questionable, and thus take issue with it or distrust my opinion as a result (and probably I'd be called out by the moderators or senior members here if that were the case).
[-] The following 1 user Likes MagisterMusicae's post:
  • jovan66102
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)