Protestant Greek Bibles?
#1
I was in a used bookstore the other day. I saw a Greek New Testament published by Zondervan, a big evangelical publisher. Alongside it there was also a New Testament Grammar which was also published by a Protestant publisher, SPCK. 

Since Catholics shouldn't used unapproved translations of the Bible, would that apply to the original language?
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#2
(05-22-2019, 10:46 AM)Alphonse il Segundo Wrote: I was in a used bookstore the other day. I saw a Greek New Testament published by Zondervan, a big evangelical publisher. Alongside it there was also a New Testament Grammar which was also published by a Protestant publisher, SPCK. 

Since Catholics shouldn't used unapproved translations of the Bible, would that apply to the original language?

I'd do a little digging.  Is it a reproduction of an original Greek New Testament (or as original as can be)?  Or is it a Protestant New Testament translated back into Koine Greek?
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#3
I heard a 'story' once, that after St. Jerome finished the Vulgate, many of the Greek Christians wanted a Greek version for themselves. St. Jerome was quite a character and had frequently complained, as he did his translations, that many of the original texts were badly deteriorated, even in his time, and he had to revert to copies. It is said he fulfilled the request and it is from this 'version' of the Bible, that the so-called 'original' copies that the King James edition was compiled and were the source of their claims of original 'copies' they used to make their 'Reader's Digest'/King James Version.

I don't know how true that story is, but it has always stuck with me and it certainly seems plausible, at least.


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#4
(05-22-2019, 01:26 PM)Melkite Wrote:
(05-22-2019, 10:46 AM)Alphonse il Segundo Wrote: I was in a used bookstore the other day. I saw a Greek New Testament published by Zondervan, a big evangelical publisher. Alongside it there was also a New Testament Grammar which was also published by a Protestant publisher, SPCK. 

Since Catholics shouldn't used unapproved translations of the Bible, would that apply to the original language?

I'd do a little digging.  Is it a reproduction of an original Greek New Testament (or as original as can be)?  Or is it a Protestant New Testament translated back into Koine Greek?

I think it is original. From what I read it was the manuscript that is used to translate to NIV.
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#5
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#6
(05-22-2019, 10:46 AM)Alphonse il Segundo Wrote: Since Catholics shouldn't used unapproved translations of the Bible, would that apply to the original language?

Without an imprimatur, how do you know it's an accurate version?

Can. 825 §1. Books of the sacred scriptures cannot be published unless the Apostolic See or the conference of bishops has approved them. For the publication of their translations into the vernacular, it is also required that they be approved by the same authority and provided with necessary and sufficient annotations.
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#7
(05-24-2019, 12:53 PM)Paul Wrote:
(05-22-2019, 10:46 AM)Alphonse il Segundo Wrote: Since Catholics shouldn't used unapproved translations of the Bible, would that apply to the original language?

Without an imprimatur, how do you know it's an accurate version?

Can. 825 §1. Books of the sacred scriptures cannot be published unless the Apostolic See or the conference of bishops has approved them. For the publication of their translations into the vernacular, it is also required that they be approved by the same authority and provided with necessary and sufficient annotations.

If it is in the original language, why would it need an imprimatur? Also, in recent decades the Imprimatur has kind of been cheapened. NAB has an imprimatur... Novus ordo books have imprimaturs.
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#8
(05-24-2019, 02:54 PM)Alphonse il Segundo Wrote: If it is in the original language, why would it need an imprimatur? Also, in recent decades the Imprimatur has kind of been cheapened. NAB has an imprimatur... Novus ordo books have imprimaturs.

Just because it's in the original language doesn't mean it's an accurate copy. Words could have been changed - the original manuscripts don't exist anymore, so it's not like there's a single Greek New Testament that all the others are copies of.
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