Women's ordination
#1
Anyone in this forum would agree that women shouldn't be ordained as priests and that they shouldn't preside the Eucharist.

However, what I'm wondering about: is it metaphysically possible form them to do it?

A realistic scenario:
Let's say, the Pope issues another encyclical with an ambiguous footnote which some German bishops interpret as a permission to "ordain" some women as "priestesses"...and decide to so just that. The women "celebrate" an Eucharist...one of the "Hosts"(?) is put on a table in a monstrance.

Do I bow down before it or is it just a piece of bread?
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#2
It is not metaphysically possible for women to be ordained. If a pope, bishop, any other cleric, or anyone at all claims otherwise, they are teaching a false doctrine. Do not follow them.
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#3
Thankfully, one of the few decent things John Paul II did was formally condemn women's ordination in Ordinatio sacerdotalis. So doctrinally, a woman cannot be ordained in the Catholic Church.

And then metaphysically, you are correct, it is impossible for a woman to be ordained. Especially into the priesthood because Christ was not a woman, therefore a priestess could never act in persona Christi.
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

“Behold this Heart which has so loved men that It spared nothing, even going so far as to exhaust and consume Itself to prove to them Its love” - Our Lord to St. Margaret Mary
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#4
But we do have tons of women Eucharistic Ministers and readers - something that I don't know what to say about. I guess any priest or bishop that allows this is "not my favorite".
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#5
(06-11-2019, 09:47 AM)JosefSilouan Wrote: Anyone in this forum would agree that women shouldn't be ordained as priests and that they shouldn't preside the Eucharist.

However, what I'm wondering about: is it metaphysically possible form them to do it?

A realistic scenario:
Let's say, the Pope issues another encyclical with an ambiguous footnote which some German bishops interpret as a permission to "ordain" some women as "priestesses"...and decide to so just that. The women "celebrate" an Eucharist...one of the "Hosts"(?) is put on a table in a monstrance.

Do I bow down before it or is it just a piece of bread?

Metaphysically it is not radically impossible that a woman could have been given that power. There is nothing in the nature of a woman which prevents this. In philosophy that would be called an obediential potency. It would not have been impossible, if God wished it to be that way, so not absolutely impossible.

God didn't set it up that way, however, so with that understood, it is impossible that a woman could become someone who could consecrate the Body and Blood of Our Lord. God's determination of the nature of the priesthood (which could have been different), metaphysically prevents a woman from exercising said priesthood.
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#6
(06-11-2019, 04:19 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: Metaphysically it is not radically impossible that a woman could have been given that power. There is nothing in the nature of a woman which prevents this. In philosophy that would be called an obediential potency. It would not have been impossible, if God wished it to be that way, so not absolutely impossible.

God didn't set it up that way, however, so with that understood, it is impossible that a woman could become someone who could consecrate the Body and Blood of Our Lord. God's determination of the nature of the priesthood (which could have been different), metaphysically prevents a woman from exercising said priesthood.

I thought the teaching was that we don't know if women could be made priests or not - that it may be possible, but because God didn't reveal it that way, we can't presume they would be valid priests, or that the Church doesn't have the authority to say whether women could be valid priests or not.  Is that a faulty understanding?
I have resigned myself to the reality that I shall have no peace or joy should I continue to exist for eternity.  The question of deism or Christianity no longer matters.  I hope that Christianity is a farce, and that when I die, my consciousness will cease to exist.  In the meantime, I ask the Theotokos to be at my side at my judgement and ask her to intercede to, as I beg, Christ to have mercy on me and to allow me to cease to exist when I die.
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#7
It is the teaching of the church that a man is the only valid matter for the sacrament of Holy Orders.  Consequently, it would be impossible for even he Pope to validly ordain a woman to any order of the priesthood.

So, concerning the statement in the original post, it is not a matter of "shouldn't be ordained " but rather "couldn't be ordained".
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#8
George Weigel explains it this way in his 2001 book, The Truth of Catholicism:
Quote:Suppose a Catholic priest is not a set of functions, but an icon? ... The iconography of Christ's spousal gift of self to his Church ... requires, in the Catholic view of things, a priest who can iconographically re-present [sic] Christ in his male donation of himself to his bride, the Church. None of this is easy to engage, much less grasp, in a culture that treats sexual differentiation as accidental, not sacramental... (pp. 65, 68).
And how much further we have gone since 2001: now some children are given "puberty blockers" in the off chance that they may want to select a different sex.
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#9
In the Old Testament,, priesthood was exercised by the Patirarch of the family and passed down to the first born son.

In the New Testament, the (ministerial) priesthood is not hereditary, but through the laying on of hands to men who can then exercise spiritual Fatherhood by Christ's Authority and in His person of being maritally the groom wedded to His bride ( the Catholic Church).

Saint Paul refers to himself as the father of believers in 1 Corinthians 4;14-15, “I am not writing this to make you ashamed, but to admonish you as my beloved children. For though you might have ten thousand guardians in Christ, you do not have many fathers. Indeed, in Christ Jesus I became your father through the gospel.
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