Was Mary married?
#1
There is a hymn heard in the Greek Church regarding the Ever-Virgin. "Agni Parthene" (I believe), is what it is called. It's opening lines follow (English translation), "O Virgin Pure, Immaculate. Rejoice, O Bride unwedded."

So in theological nuance, she and St. Joseph never had conjugal intercourse which is generally considered necessary to complete the marital bond. So in the full sense of marriage, can an Ever-Virgin actually be married?
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#2
Tradition teaches that both she and St. Joseph took their own vows of chastity before they were married. And this is further illustrated if you read the Mystical City of God by Ven. Mary of Agreda. You also have to keep in mind that it wouldn't have been possible to consummate the marriage anyway because Mary was pregnant with Our Lord by the time their wedding came around. St. Joseph grieved over this information in the Gospel of St. Luke when he realized she was pregnant.
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#3
(06-12-2019, 07:16 PM)newenglandsun Wrote: There is a hymn heard in the Greek Church regarding the Ever-Virgin. "Agni Parthene" (I believe), is what it is called. It's opening lines follow (English translation), "O Virgin Pure, Immaculate. Rejoice, O Bride unwedded."

So in theological nuance, she and St. Joseph never had conjugal intercourse which is generally considered necessary to complete the marital bond. So in the full sense of marriage, can an Ever-Virgin actually be married?

She was espoused to St. Joseph according to Mosaic law.  This was before the divine Redeemer restored marriage to its original dignity. 

...and Yes, it is possible for a person to minister the sacrament of holy matrimony and remain perpetually virgin.  It would simply be an unconsummated bond between the two.

As a side note, Divna Ljubojevic's recording of the Agni Parthene is my favorite:

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#4
Marriage is a contract between spouses by which they give to the other the right over their own bodies for acts proper to generation, as well as promise mutual assistance and support.

This applies to all marriages, Sacramental or not.

Just because by contract someone is given a right does not mean that they must exercise that right. A marriage is perfectly valid even if the spouses always remain virginal, but for this to be permissible, it must be for a higher purpose.

Clearly the union of St Joseph and the Blessed Virgin was for the good of the legitimacy of Jesus Christ, as well as his natural protection, etc. so for a higher purpose.

Some couples have imitated this Josephite marriage for a higher purpose as well.

Historically this was also the case for the clergy who were married. They vowed perpetual continence.
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#5
(06-12-2019, 10:34 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: Some couples have imitated this Josephite marriage for a higher purpose as well.

St Edward, K&C, and Queen Edith.
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#6
(06-12-2019, 10:34 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: Marriage is a contract between spouses by which they give to the other the right over their own bodies for acts proper to generation, as well as promise mutual assistance and support.

There is a difference between marriage according to the Mosaic law, natural marriage after the restoration of Holy Matrimony, and Holy Matrimony itself, though.

St. Joseph thought to "put away" his wife.  Under Mosaic law, this would have allowed St. Joseph to take another woman to wife due to the hardness of the hearts of the Jews.  He may not ever have done so, but it would have been allowed.  After the restoration of Holy Matrimony, even in a natural marriage, a man cannot "put away" his wife and take another.  (This is notwithstanding the pauline privilege which requires action on the part of an authority to dissolve a natural marriage in favor of the faith.)
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#7
(06-13-2019, 08:54 AM)yablabo Wrote:
(06-12-2019, 10:34 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: Marriage is a contract between spouses by which they give to the other the right over their own bodies for acts proper to generation, as well as promise mutual assistance and support.

There is a difference between marriage according to the Mosaic law, natural marriage after the restoration of Holy Matrimony, and Holy Matrimony itself, though.

St. Joseph thought to "put away" his wife.  Under Mosaic law, this would have allowed St. Joseph to take another woman to wife due to the hardness of the hearts of the Jews.  He may not ever have done so, but it would have been allowed.  After the restoration of Holy Matrimony, even in a natural marriage, a man cannot "put away" his wife and take another.  (This is notwithstanding the pauline privilege which requires action on the part of an authority to dissolve a natural marriage in favor of the faith.)

Was the putting away of wives only allowed during the "kichah" (betrothal) period?  Or was it also allowed after "chuppah" (actual marriage)?
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#8
(06-13-2019, 03:48 PM)mpk1987 Wrote:
(06-13-2019, 08:54 AM)yablabo Wrote:
(06-12-2019, 10:34 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: Marriage is a contract between spouses by which they give to the other the right over their own bodies for acts proper to generation, as well as promise mutual assistance and support.

There is a difference between marriage according to the Mosaic law, natural marriage after the restoration of Holy Matrimony, and Holy Matrimony itself, though.

St. Joseph thought to "put away" his wife.  Under Mosaic law, this would have allowed St. Joseph to take another woman to wife due to the hardness of the hearts of the Jews.  He may not ever have done so, but it would have been allowed.  After the restoration of Holy Matrimony, even in a natural marriage, a man cannot "put away" his wife and take another.  (This is notwithstanding the pauline privilege which requires action on the part of an authority to dissolve a natural marriage in favor of the faith.)

Was the putting away of wives only allowed during the "kichah" (betrothal) period?  Or was it also allowed after "chuppah" (actual marriage)?

Even after the chuppah/nuptials, divorce and remarriage was allowed.  The only stipulation was that if the woman remarried and was divorced a second time, the first husband could not have her back.
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#9
Thanks, yablabo! I enjoy the scholarship here. It's very edifying.
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