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#1
I don't know if this is quite the right thread to be posting this in, since it deals with a rather...explosive topic about which only one discussion thread was allowed, but that particular topic isn't the focus of this post. Rather, it's the fact that Mr Stephen O'Reilly, the author of the Traditional Catholic blog Roma Locuta Est, graciously posted on his website the text of an email testimony I sent him, making this the first-ever time any words of mine have been included in the corpus of the TradCat Blogosphere - and shall remain there, God-willing, for the education of posterity until Christ returns in glory!

For anyone who would care to see it, the post is here:

https://romalocutaest.com/2019/05/03/the...vacantist/

N.B.: There were a couple small errors in my testimony that I want to correct: 1) The Latin terms munus and ministerium are not "synonymous with 'office,'" but rather synonymous with each other and translatable as "office." 2) Benedict did not say he was renouncing the "office and governance of the Church," but rather the "power of office for the governance of the Church."

Once again, regarding the topic of the testimony, I'd rather not start a debate - I already tried that from the opposite side of the spectrum back in February 2018, and immediately turned crybaby and had the thread deleted when I realized I was in over my head sad I merely put this here as a record of the fact that something I thought would never happen - my words being part of a fairly visible TradCat blog - has happened and I'm very happy about it Smile
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#2
Nice analysis of the Latin!

I do think you were a bit harsh here:

Quote:but the fact that he continues to wear the papal white and continues to use his papal name and title is nothing short of scandalous and raises serious questions about his powers of judgement. The fact that he appears to see nothing wrong with this arrangement after six years only proves to me that – when it comes to erroneous and destructive ideas – Benedict and Francis are merely different in degree, not in kind.

Even if you contend that Pope Benedict ought to discontinue wearing white etc., this prudential gaffe (if it is a gaffe at all - I'm not really convinced) is not exactly the same kind of error as publishing a document that says or insinuates that man isn't able to live according to the moral code. One is a prudential error while the other is possibly an error against faith. In other words, no, they're not merely different in degree.
Filioli mei, non diligamus verbo neque lingua, sed opere et veritate.

Vos omnes amatores pulcherrimae linguae ecclesiae nostrae, videte filum quo de rebus sanctis profanisque colloqui possumus.
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#3
Maybe so. I've already been chided once by a friend of mine for being too hard on Benedict, but I'm still in the 'anger' stage of accepting that he was part of the problem - given that he was Pope when I converted, I felt almost like I had come into the Church under false pretenses sad And you gotta admit, even if it is just a prudential gaffe, it's a pretty serious one considering what people have been able to extrapolate from it - then again, some people will do anything to not have to acknowledge Francis as Pope, so I guess I can't blame Benedict for that.
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#4
I don’t know...Benedict did some things that were not helpful at all, but John Paul II had such poor judgment when it came to selecting bishops and cardinals that Benedict’s share of the blame pales in comparison.
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#5
To be fair, it's not so much anything he did as Pope that got my goat (out of all the Conciliar Popes, I think he was overall the best) - it's more the bizarre and confusing manner in which he resigned (which is part of what pushed me toward Benevacantism in the first place, which kinda makes me feel like he personally duped me) and the fact that he contributed mightily to the Revolution before he became Pope (e.g., advocating basically the same policy as Amoris Laetitia back in 1972).
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