Conversion of agnostics
#1
My wife is a Baptised Anglican(Church Of England) but is agnostic. Since amending my life, or at least beginning to, three years ago, my wife has been as good as I could have hoped about it. She attends Mass every week, prays the Rosary every night and never fails to be a Catholic mother to our daughter, answering her questions as if she really believed the answers.
 
She is a brilliant mother and very good at it, but she was a reluctant one. She has become completely open to more children in every way. She has been better than I could have ever hoped about it all. When I think about it I am amazed. So I now, for all intensive purposes have this Catholic wife, with one unfortunate exception, she isn't. My wife has been bought up in a non religious family and is not sure one way or another about the existence of God. She can see the problems of the world and how they relate to the dethroning of Christ as King. We have 3 terrific Priests in our SSPX Parish with sermons to match every week and monthly conferences. She gets it as far as the social applications go, she listens and understands, but doesn't know if God is real. I'm glad she is honest. We all know of people in the novus ordo who convert to please Lovey and go on to a life of sacrilege. My wife understands this is not right and why, so there is no danger of this happening.
 
My problem is this. There is a million stories of conversion out there and a convert to go along with all of them. They are all about people who believed in God and then found His True Church. These stories are never about atheists or agnostics. One thing we are both sick of lately is being told about this convert and that convert, all of them from another "Christian" sect. It doesn't take Einstein to figure out that someone who believes in God doesn't take a whole lot of convincing that God exists.
 
So can anyone share their own personal story of conversion from atheism or agnosticism? Or share a true story they know of? Opinions and ideas are nice and I repect the charity with which they are delivered, but I really want the facts from someone who has been through it and preferably come out the other side, or knows of a true story of the like.
 
I really want to know what to say to my wife to help her believe.
 
Thanks in advance.
 
 
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#2
Greetings,

I am a convert from atheism, but I fear that my conversion story may not be of real help to you …

I was a typical atheist teenager (having stopped practicing the Catholic religion before my teenage years) but one pretty interested in politics. I refused to believe in God despite my maternal grandmother’s pleas in February, but soon thereafter I started to go on political blogs delivering a Catholic point of view and then on myriad other Catholic sites; I was touched by the site owners’ attachment to the faith, the assuredness with which they believed, and recall finding the Catholic faith beautiful. Upon reading the Gospels I believed, God taking from me the blindfold of prejudice and ignorance that I had up to then so dearly clung to. I remember the Sermon on the Mount particularly reaching out to my deepest self. I believed without needing a proof of the texts’ authenticity and verifiability; I consider my conversion to be an action of the Holy Ghost.

I shall pray for your wife’s conversion.

PS:
Daniel Wrote:

So I now, for all intensive purposes have this Catholic wife, with one unfortunate exception, she isn't.


Did you mean “for all intents and purposes”? [Image: laff.gif]

Also, can any of you please send me a private message if you have any idea on how I should go about, besides prayer, obtaining the conversion of my 24-year-old sister whom I see every few months and who wears a “healing stone”, consults the fortune teller, is interested in Buddhism, does not care one bit about monotheistic religion and therefore does not have a great attention span when spoken to of these matters.
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#3
Daniel Wrote:So can anyone share their own personal story of conversion from atheism or agnosticism? Or share a true story they know of?

I'd recommend Now I See (1938) by Sir Arnold Lunn. I, too, was an agnostic for a while in my youth, but I found it terribly unsatisfactory to regard my own life as a dead end with no firm hope of happiness beyond. On looking around at various claims about what might lie beyond, I found the Christian claims to be by far the best in quality, as well as the most rationally believable on investigation. After a delay of some years while I strove earnestly to be pretty much any kind of a Christian other than a Catholic, I decided to sit down and read the New Testament in its entirety, in hope that it might shed some light on what was really the right church to join. Lo and behold ... now I see ... the right church turned out to be a hierarchical one, founded on Peter as the chief of the Apostles, with a strong belief in the Real Presence and the necessity of visible unity! This really was not looking good for any Christian who was determined not to be a Catholic. My determination failed--thanks be to God!--and I joined the Church.

Blessings,

Don McMaster
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#4
I wasn't brought up a Catholic, and remained an atheist for much of my early life. It wasn't till I was 19 that I came to Catholicism and I was 20 when I was received into the Church last year. To read my full conversion story click here: http://scottmichael.blogspot.com

It was only this year that I became truly traditional, realising that this is the only way Catholicism is meant to be.


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#5
I was atheist.  As a child I was very curious about God and always asked my parents.  My mom was agnostic and gave some Christian-type answers.  My dad didn't really say his views.  Later, after my mom's adultery my parents divorced and my sister and I lived our teenage years with my dad.  At this time Dad told us his atheist views and we both adopted these views and began following our parents' example of a sinful lifestyle.  In my late 20's I met my husband who is Baptist.  I thought I would convince him of atheism, but he and his dad converted me to Christianity. I think I always wanted to be Christian, but my father always ridiculed Christians so much it was not an option for me.  But my father-in-law is an intelligent man of honor, who is a fine Christian example for his son.  He talked to me about God- never in a pushy way-but he could tell I was interested.  I just hope that I will be able to be the same kind of example to him as a Catholic and perhaps bring him to the true Church some day.
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#6
My conversion story may not help, but it should st least show how God's grace comes when least expected.

I was baptized Catholic, but other than that, I was not brought up practicing, since everyone else in my house was not practicing either. We only went to Mass on Christmas, Easter and Filipino fiestas. There were some religious objects in the home, but true respect for them was never taught, it seemed more something cultural that all Filipinos (who were Catholic, at least in name only) had (i.e. the Infant Jesus or "Santo Nino"; Blessed Virgin). Sometimes, things like crucifixes were given a more superstitious look (especially by vampire stories).
I had a friend who was baptist, and brought me with him to Vacation Bible School one time. I almost took in baptist ideas, but thank God it did not happen. Later on in my life, when I was about 12 or 13, my desire for wealth got me believing in a heresy that was at the same time a big money-making scheme- the so-called "hundredfold heresy" that made me believe that the more I gave to certain quck protestant "preachers" the bigger my monetary reward from God would be. Caught up with this was evangelical "faith healing" from entities like Benny Hinn.
Seeing that it did not work, I then turned to candle spells for wealth and prosperity, but it did not last long. After that I was in sort of a limbo status, just going with things of the world.
Around 8th grade, somehow after doing some internet browsing, I got more interested in learning about the Catholic faith and even decided to make my first confession. I would go to Mass, but often wondered why the Real Presence was no longer talked about and why there was watered-down teaching on Purgatory. Still, I was duped into thinking ecumenism was good and didn't anything about Traditional Catholicism.
10th grade came and while looking for an exorcised Saint Benedict Medal (since the priests would not give them proper blessings/exorcisms for some unknown reason, one priest even substituting the word "bless" in place of "exorcise"), I stumbled on a site that offered one per person. On that same site, I forgot which, said stuff about the Traditional Latin Mass and was stupefied at why the changes happened. There was one nearby, but back then it was too far from mom, and in addition I got misleading info about the SSPX.
It was in 2003 that I finally started attending the Traditional Latin Mass with my mom (though still indifferent to this day, though she likes it better than the NO, now she doesn't attend because she's "too busy"). After 10th grade I stopped going to the pre-Confirmation classes at the nearby NO parish simply because they didn't teach anything fruitful. Now, while I like many struggle with sin, have found Traditional Catholicism home.

Sorry for the long post, but have confidence in God's grace as you pray for your wife, for I am still praying for my parents, my sister and her "husband" whom she married outside the church before a prot minister/judge when I was young (7), as well as many friends from school. Sometimes I feel like giving up, but thank the Lord I haven't. Try sparking some interest in the Faith (To this day I don't know exactly what led to my conversion other than Divine Providence). Btw, I am the only trad in my family, and being 18, persecutions are tough.


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#7
I just find it interesting, and very heartening!, that many converts to Catholicism end up being traditionalists.
 
It just proves there are men of goodwill who love Christ everywhere, and God draws them to the incomparable TLM which pleases Him greatly.
 
You are truly proof of God's love for us in that He reaches out and brings us closer to Him!
 
 
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