Your Favorite Scriptural Verses At The Moment : And Why ?
#11
Amice, ad quod venisti?

In the RSV-CE (and most English translations, I think), this verse is translated from the Greek as "Friend, why have you come?", or something to that effect.

The Douay-Rheims provides a very literal translation of the Vulgate; "Friend, whereto art you come?"

The Latin can be read, "Friend, to what end [that is, "why"] have you come?", and this is likely Jerome's intended meaning, given the (to my knowledge) general consent in translations directly from the Greek (full disclosure, I have no Greek). However, a literal translation of the Latin into modern English would be, "Friend, to what have you come?" So one could interpret Christ's words to Judas as a different kind of admonition from the one apparently meant in the RSV-CE.

The rendition, "Why have you come" seems to be Christ forcing Judas to admit that he has come to the garden to betray the Son of Man, and thus to admit that he's a traitor. It also invites Judas to consider his motives and what he's getting in return. It, too, is an opportunity for repentance.

But the other sense which is allowed by the Latin seems more personal between Christ and Judas. Of course whichever sense of the words is taken, Christ still calls Judas "amice", friend, despite His knowledge of Judas' betrayal. However, in this second sense Christ's words can be read as saying something like, "Friend, look what you've come to! Look at the state of your soul! I pity you because I love you." This reading feels more like John's Gospel than Matthew's, but the lamentation over Jerusalem in Matthew provides some precedent for this kind of sentiment from Christ.

Christ says this to each of us when we sin, too. We offend His adorable heart, and He responds by granting us further chances for repentance, mildly admonishing us each; Amice, ad quod venisti?
Filioli mei, non diligamus verbo neque lingua, sed opere et veritate.

Vos omnes amatores pulcherrimae linguae ecclesiae nostrae, videte filum quo de rebus sanctis profanisque colloqui possumus.
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#12
Mine is the last verse in the parable of the Prodigal Son: "But it was fit that we should make merry and be glad, for this thy brother was dead and is come to life again; he was lost and is found." It sums up so completely God's inexhaustible forgiveness and mercy. He brings us back to life from the death of sin, and then rejoices at our return. I've been finding a lot of comfort there lately.
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#13
My favorite is when Jesus says there's no marriage in heaven. It's one of those things that folks of all walks of life can agree on, from every faith, believers and unbelievers. Because after spending lifetimes with another person, few if any folks would include marriage in their idea of heaven.
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#14
(09-07-2019, 09:31 PM)LionHippo Wrote: My favorite is when Jesus says there's no marriage in heaven. It's one of those things that folks of all walks of life can agree on, from every faith, believers and unbelievers. Because after spending lifetimes with another person, few if any folks would include marriage in their idea of heaven.

lol
Jesus to St Faustina:

"For you I descended from heaven to earth; for you I allowed myself to be nailed to the cross; for you I let my Sacred Heart be pierced with a lance, thus opening wide the source of mercy for you. Come, then, with trust to draw graces from this fountain. I never reject a contrite heart." (Diary, 1485)

"Remember My Passion, and if you do not believe My words, at least believe My wounds." (Diary, 379)

"It is in My Passion that you must seek light and strength." (Diary, 654)
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