How do you afford Catholic school?
#1
At our local parish school it would cost, ballpark, $14,000 per year for two kids to attend the parish school.  That price IS the 'supporting our parish financially' price.  The local high school is about $12,000/year, per child.
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There are "scholarships" available, but the website says they usually amount to about $500 per year.
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If you have kids in Catholic school, do these prices seem normal?
If they are normal, how do you afford this?
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The kids are doing fine academically in public schools, behavior is fine, attendance is fine, they go to Sunday School and Mass, but it would be very, very good to get these kids out of the public school system - they are exposed to behaviors and values that are, well, undesirable.  The negative exposure for one child is getting worse.
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Any info would be helpful.
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#2
Long story short: we can’t afford Catholic high school. The local Catholic high school is run by the diocese and made up of kids from several local parishes. Tuition, after a scholarship, would’ve been $10,000. I wish I had 10K sitting around, lol

Parishes here run elementary and middle schools. We were very fortunate that our pastor is big on restoration of Catholic culture, and has mentioned several times how when he was a kid, it was unheard of for a parishioner to pay for a Catholic school. As such, a lot of the parish’s money goes to the school, so most families don’t pay much. Our oldest boy went there for middle school, and is now in the public high school. The students’ behavior is night and day, but we’ve been fortunate that he and big sis weren’t impacted too much by behavior rubbing off on them.  The younger two boys went to the local public elementary school for help with reading. The school is really good. Currently we homeschool the 6th grade boy, as we weren’t impressed with the middle school, to be polite.

To counter the un-Catholic trash culture we see in the public middle and high school, we try to keep the kids involved with Catholic youth and home school groups in the area. There’s a group here comprised of families from several local parishes that does bbqs, Friday night parties, hiking and ski trips, etc. Yeah, they’re for homeschoolers, but they welcome any Catholic family. anything like that available near you?
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#3
Where I live, the Catholic schools simply aren’t anywhere near as good as the local public schools. Even the teachers that actually have degrees aren’t very good. Quite a few of the teachers don’t have a teaching degree, and some don’t even have a degree at all.

I look at the offerings of my local Catholic schools, and compare them to my local public schools. Even though the local schools’ offerings are so meager they’re laughable, they are wonderful by comparison to the Catholic schools.  And for what?  Most of the people who go to Catholic school don’t even go to Mass anymore. My secular friends knew the Catholic school students because they had the best parties. They got the best drugs and alcohol, and were most eager to have sex. The Catholic schools take time, energy, and money away from the parishes that’s should be used to benefit everyone, not just families, not just children- especially if they’re doing a lousy job at focusing on those.
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#4
Or, you could move to the Diocese of Lincoln! Seriously, it doesn't have to be the way you describe it. The following is taken from 'Why Aren't Other Dioceses Looking to Lincoln?' from Liturgy Guy.


Quote:A Catholic Education

While I have saved this for last, in many ways education is the primary ingredient to Lincoln’s recipe for success. Bishop Glennon Flavin’s vision for a diocese that allowed its children to go to Catholic school at an affordable cost and to be taught authentic Catholicism by religious sisters and priests is integral to the diocesan mission.

While Lincoln’s Catholic population is less than 100,000, they have provided the faithful with 27 elementary schools and 6 high schools to educate the next generation. More importantly, most diocesan schools have at least 1-2 habited sisters and all Catholic schools are staffed by at least one priest.

As noted earlier, high school theology classes are only taught by priests and religious sisters. For example, the Catholic high school in Lincoln, Pius X, has over 1200 students and is staffed by 4 religious sisters (in traditional religious habits) and 15 priests who always wear their clerics. Each newly ordained priest can expect to teach high school for at least 5 years. Priests who are assigned to parishes in smaller towns with a Catholic high school are still expected to teach as well.

Unlike other dioceses which require school masses only once a week, or in some cases once a month, each grade school in the Diocese of Lincoln is required to offer daily mass for the entire school each day.

However, there may be no better example of Lincoln’s commitment to the future than the fact that it’s diocesan schools have some of the lowest tuition costs in the entire country. As an example, St. Teresa’s Catholic School in town has an annual tuition cost of only $100 per student, and yet it is a thriving school with a habited sister as principal.

As one local explained, “These good, solid, Catholic schools are the roots of the diocese and continue to pump out religious vocations and plain good Catholics, thanks to the work of our clergy, diocesan staff, and laity.”

Oh, and our Diocesan seminary is full, too.
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#5
(09-21-2019, 03:49 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: Or, you could move to the Diocese of Lincoln! Seriously, it doesn't have to be the way you describe it. The following is taken from 'Why Aren't Other Dioceses Looking to Lincoln?' from Liturgy Guy.


Quote:A Catholic Education

While I have saved this for last, in many ways education is the primary ingredient to Lincoln’s recipe for success. Bishop Glennon Flavin’s vision for a diocese that allowed its children to go to Catholic school at an affordable cost and to be taught authentic Catholicism by religious sisters and priests is integral to the diocesan mission.

While Lincoln’s Catholic population is less than 100,000, they have provided the faithful with 27 elementary schools and 6 high schools to educate the next generation. More importantly, most diocesan schools have at least 1-2 habited sisters and all Catholic schools are staffed by at least one priest.

As noted earlier, high school theology classes are only taught by priests and religious sisters. For example, the Catholic high school in Lincoln, Pius X, has over 1200 students and is staffed by 4 religious sisters (in traditional religious habits) and 15 priests who always wear their clerics. Each newly ordained priest can expect to teach high school for at least 5 years. Priests who are assigned to parishes in smaller towns with a Catholic high school are still expected to teach as well.

Unlike other dioceses which require school masses only once a week, or in some cases once a month, each grade school in the Diocese of Lincoln is required to offer daily mass for the entire school each day.

However, there may be no better example of Lincoln’s commitment to the future than the fact that it’s diocesan schools have some of the lowest tuition costs in the entire country. As an example, St. Teresa’s Catholic School in town has an annual tuition cost of only $100 per student, and yet it is a thriving school with a habited sister as principal.

As one local explained, “These good, solid, Catholic schools are the roots of the diocese and continue to pump out religious vocations and plain good Catholics, thanks to the work of our clergy, diocesan staff, and laity.”

Oh, and our Diocesan seminary is full, too.

They have to go where the work is....but I would have no problem with Lincoln.  Yes, I know it is in Nebraska.
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I do agree that the Church is missing the boat with tuition being so high.  Keeping the kids within "the Catholic system" makes being Catholic much easier in this society.  It is hard enough to keep them Catholic without surrounding the kids with the stuff they have to deal with in public school.
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#6
Quote:Jeeter wrote:

Parishes here run elementary and middle schools. We were very fortunate that our pastor is big on restoration of Catholic culture, and has mentioned several times how when he was a kid, it was unheard of for a parishioner to pay for a Catholic school. As such, a lot of the parish’s money goes to the school, so most families don’t pay much. Our oldest boy went there for middle school, and is now in the public high school. The students’ behavior is night and day, but we’ve been fortunate that he and big sis weren’t impacted by essay writing service too much by behavior rubbing off on them.  The younger two boys went to the local public elementary school for help with reading. The school is really good. Currently we homeschool the 6th grade boy, as we weren’t impressed with the middle school, to be polite.



Here's the list of scholarships for elementary schools:
  • Josephine C. Conolly Achievement Award;
  • St. Thomas More Association;
  • Vianney Scholars Program;
  • The Charles Ellis Trust Scholarships For Girls;
  • Archdiocesan Scholarships;
  • Neumann program
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#7
I strongly recommend that if possible, you homeschool your children. I've been homeschooled with Seton (setonhome.org) and their curriculum couldn't be more Catholic, nor could their tuition be better -- they even offer financial aid. A word of warning though: it's tough for both parent and child. Their curriculum is solid, the grammar is top-notch, and I've been more than prepared for college.

If you can't do that, make sure they understand their faith or you shall lose them. Get a copy of the Baltimore Catechism (vol. I for < 8 years, vol. II for 8+). Make sure they're involved in the Church. Make it a point to instill in them a desire to die rather than sin -- that life's meaning is nil without God Who Is its whole and entirety. Make sure they're prepared to defend their Faith and to die for it: let them learn Plato, Augustine, and Aquinas -- that their knowledge of the scholastic tradition may enable them to know truly and reason -- or their inability to reason shall cause them to be blinded and ensnared by the devil.
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#8
Relatively speaking, the amount you cite is about on par with what my Dear Departed Wife and I had to spend to keep our three kids in Catholic Elementary schools back in the 80s. We were able to send two of our kids through Catholic High School, but sadly, not our youngest. Pat and I had to work many overtime hours, equivalent to nearly two full time jobs each. It was really hard and she lost her second job and my OT got throttled back when it was time for our youngest to go to HS. She ended up in a rather decent Public HS, but finding such these days would be a serious challenge.

Bottom line: We sacrificed a lot to get them a Catholic Education and I am very proud and happy that we did. I think they were largely, better educated and with a good moral foundation that even in the 80s and 90s, they couldn't have gotten at a public school.
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#9
(09-21-2019, 02:38 PM)Credidi Propter Wrote: Where I live, the Catholic schools simply aren’t anywhere near as good as the local public schools. Even the teachers that actually have degrees aren’t very good. Quite a few of the teachers don’t have a teaching degree, and some don’t even have a degree at all.

I look at the offerings of my local Catholic schools, and compare them to my local public schools. Even though the local schools’ offerings are so meager they’re laughable, they are wonderful by comparison to the Catholic schools.  And for what?  Most of the people who go to Catholic school don’t even go to Mass anymore. My secular friends knew the Catholic school students because they had the best parties. They got the best drugs and alcohol, and were most eager to have sex. The Catholic schools take time, energy, and money away from the parishes that’s should be used to benefit everyone, not just families, not just children- especially if they’re doing a lousy job at focusing on those.

I agree with this.  The money would be better spent on supporting vocations, updating the Churches, faith formation programs, and charity.

Catholic schools seem to be a huge liability for parishes these days, with little return on investment as far as teaching the faith.  Every year, we get the stories about a Catholic school teacher who gets "married" to their same sex partner, or about the girl who wants to wear a suit and tie to her First Communion, or some other stunt that is nothing but a massive headache for the dioceses.  

It used to be, when I attended Catholic schools in the 80s-90s, that they were renowned for doing "more with less."  That is, the cost of tuition was well below how much was spent per public school pupil, but with higher academic achievement as evidenced by standardized testing scores, college admissions and scholarships.  

I'm sure a lot has changed since I graduated high school, though.  Technology wasn't as big a factor back then.  Nowadays, Catholic schools feel compelled to keep up with the offerings of public schools, which get much more money to keep up with new programs.  The Catholic schools simply can't keep up - but they seem to be trying to match the public schools just for "appearance" and most of them are completely misguided in their aims.  

I see Catholic schools advertising how they "have S.T.E.M!"  "We have S.T.E.M!!" to jump on the bandwagon of all thing scientism, but without the more advanced trappings of the public schools.

What would be more impressive is getting kids to learn how to think, i.e. in the manner of the Catholic "classical schools" which exist outside the jurisdiction of dioceses.  But, those still cost at least 50% more than the average Catholic school, from what I can tell.

Wouldn't it be more impressive for a Catholic school to claim that, 10 years down the road, 100% of their students were still Catholic, rather than X amount made it into the secular public university that's going to eventually destroy their faith?
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#10
Where we live its about the same. My dd attends half time. Its 6000. But thats through scholarships. Shes an active child. She joined church choir and all service things.

I would keep her home full time-- but the math is too hard for me.  
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