How do you afford Catholic school?
#11
(09-24-2020, 05:40 AM)LionHippo Wrote:
(09-21-2019, 02:38 PM)Credidi Propter Wrote: Where I live, the Catholic schools simply aren’t anywhere near as good as the local public schools. Even the teachers that actually have degrees aren’t very good. Quite a few of the teachers don’t have a teaching degree, and some don’t even have a degree at all.

I look at the offerings of my local Catholic schools, and compare them to my local public schools. Even though the local schools’ offerings are so meager they’re laughable, they are wonderful by comparison to the Catholic schools.  And for what?  Most of the people who go to Catholic school don’t even go to Mass anymore. My secular friends knew the Catholic school students because they had the best parties. They got the best drugs and alcohol, and were most eager to have sex. The Catholic schools take time, energy, and money away from the parishes that’s should be used to benefit everyone, not just families, not just children- especially if they’re doing a lousy job at focusing on those.

I agree with this.  The money would be better spent on supporting vocations, updating the Churches, faith formation programs, and charity.

Catholic schools seem to be a huge liability for parishes these days, with little return on investment as far as teaching the faith.  Every year, we get the stories about a Catholic school teacher who gets "married" to their same sex partner, or about the girl who wants to wear a suit and tie to her First Communion, or some other stunt that is nothing but a massive headache for the dioceses.  

It used to be, when I attended Catholic schools in the 80s-90s, that they were renowned for doing "more with less."  That is, the cost of tuition was well below how much was spent per public school pupil, but with higher academic achievement as evidenced by standardized testing scores, college admissions and scholarships.  

I'm sure a lot has changed since I graduated high school, though.  Technology wasn't as big a factor back then.  Nowadays, Catholic schools feel compelled to keep up with the offerings of public schools, which get much more money to keep up with new programs.  The Catholic schools simply can't keep up - but they seem to be trying to match the public schools just for "appearance" and most of them are completely misguided in their aims.  

I see Catholic schools advertising how they "have S.T.E.M!"  "We have S.T.E.M!!" to jump on the bandwagon of all thing scientism, but without the more advanced trappings of the public schools.

What would be more impressive is getting kids to learn how to think, i.e. in the manner of the Catholic "classical schools" which exist outside the jurisdiction of dioceses.  But, those still cost at least 50% more than the average Catholic school, from what I can tell.

Wouldn't it be more impressive for a Catholic school to claim that, 10 years down the road, 100% of their students were still Catholic, rather than X amount made it into the secular public university that's going to eventually destroy their faith?
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#12
(11-18-2020, 08:31 PM)AnaCarolina Wrote:
(09-24-2020, 05:40 AM)LionHippo Wrote:
(09-21-2019, 02:38 PM)Credidi Propter Wrote: Where I live, the Catholic schools simply aren’t anywhere near as good as the local public schools. Even the teachers that actually have degrees aren’t very good. Quite a few of the teachers don’t have a teaching degree, and some don’t even have a degree at all.

I look at the offerings of my local Catholic schools, and compare them to my local public schools. Even though the local schools’ offerings are so meager they’re laughable, they are wonderful by comparison to the Catholic schools.  And for what?  Most of the people who go to Catholic school don’t even go to Mass anymore. My secular friends knew the Catholic school students because they had the best parties. They got the best drugs and alcohol, and were most eager to have sex. The Catholic schools take time, energy, and money away from the parishes that’s should be used to benefit everyone, not just families, not just children- especially if they’re doing a lousy job at focusing on those.

I agree with this.  The money would be better spent on supporting vocations, updating the Churches, faith formation programs, and charity.

Catholic schools seem to be a huge liability for parishes these days, with little return on investment as far as teaching the faith.  Every year, we get the stories about a Catholic school teacher who gets "married" to their same sex partner, or about the girl who wants to wear a suit and tie to her First Communion, or some other stunt that is nothing but a massive headache for the dioceses.  

It used to be, when I attended Catholic schools in the 80s-90s, that they were renowned for doing "more with less."  That is, the cost of tuition was well below how much was spent per public school pupil, but with higher academic achievement as evidenced by standardized testing scores, college admissions and scholarships.  

I'm sure a lot has changed since I graduated high school, though.  Technology wasn't as big a factor back then.  Nowadays, Catholic schools feel compelled to keep up with the offerings of public schools, which get much more money to keep up with new programs.  The Catholic schools simply can't keep up - but they seem to be trying to match the public schools just for "appearance" and most of them are completely misguided in their aims.  

I see Catholic schools advertising how they "have S.T.E.M!"  "We have S.T.E.M!!" to jump on the bandwagon of all thing scientism, but without the more advanced trappings of the public schools.

What would be more impressive is getting kids to learn how to think, i.e. in the manner of the Catholic "classical schools" which exist outside the jurisdiction of dioceses.  But, those still cost at least 50% more than the average Catholic school, from what I can tell.

Wouldn't it be more impressive for a Catholic school to claim that, 10 years down the road, 100% of their students were still Catholic, rather than X amount made it into the secular public university that's going to eventually destroy their faith?



Snother thing we have 3 priests snd a few nuns. We are not affiliated with parish. The alumni support our traditional school.
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#13
Pope Pius XI said that the primary purpose of marriage is the procreation and education of children, so money should be no object when it comes to educating children in the faith.

(09-21-2019, 03:49 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: Or, you could move to the Diocese of Lincoln! Seriously, it doesn't have to be the way you describe it. The following is taken from 'Why Aren't Other Dioceses Looking to Lincoln?' from Liturgy Guy.


Quote:A Catholic Education

While I have saved this for last, in many ways education is the primary ingredient to Lincoln’s recipe for success. Bishop Glennon Flavin’s vision for a diocese that allowed its children to go to Catholic school at an affordable cost and to be taught authentic Catholicism by religious sisters and priests is integral to the diocesan mission.

While Lincoln’s Catholic population is less than 100,000, they have provided the faithful with 27 elementary schools and 6 high schools to educate the next generation. More importantly, most diocesan schools have at least 1-2 habited sisters and all Catholic schools are staffed by at least one priest.

As noted earlier, high school theology classes are only taught by priests and religious sisters. For example, the Catholic high school in Lincoln, Pius X, has over 1200 students and is staffed by 4 religious sisters (in traditional religious habits) and 15 priests who always wear their clerics. Each newly ordained priest can expect to teach high school for at least 5 years. Priests who are assigned to parishes in smaller towns with a Catholic high school are still expected to teach as well.

Unlike other dioceses which require school masses only once a week, or in some cases once a month, each grade school in the Diocese of Lincoln is required to offer daily mass for the entire school each day.

However, there may be no better example of Lincoln’s commitment to the future than the fact that it’s diocesan schools have some of the lowest tuition costs in the entire country. As an example, St. Teresa’s Catholic School in town has an annual tuition cost of only $100 per student, and yet it is a thriving school with a habited sister as principal.

As one local explained, “These good, solid, Catholic schools are the roots of the diocese and continue to pump out religious vocations and plain good Catholics, thanks to the work of our clergy, diocesan staff, and laity.”

Oh, and our Diocesan seminary is full, too.

I wouldn't send my children to a diocesan school if they paid me tens of thousands per year. I have known countless people who have lost their faith in those places. And the cherry on top is that their parents paid for it to happen! Seriously, most of the kids I know in diocesan Catholic school aren't even Catholic. They are secular kids whose upper middle-class parents are trying to keep them out of the crappy public school system. Ever hear about the quality of teachers in the diocesan schools? It seems like they are always in the news for being gay or pregnant out of wedlock.
”What happened after the [Second Vatican] Council was something else entirely: in the place of liturgy as the fruit of development came fabricated liturgy. We abandoned the organic, living process of growth and development over centuries, and replaced it – as in a manufacturing process – with a fabrication, a banal on -the-spot product.” -- Cardinal Ratzinger, in the preface to Klaus Gambler's The Reform of the Roman Liturgy: Its Problems and Background
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#14
I believe tuition at our parish school is $11K per year per student.  They do numerous fundraisers in order to reduce that for needy students as well as to buy superfluous things.

That said, I am opposed to schooling for children.  It’s no one’s business how parents choose to educate children.
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#15
(11-19-2020, 05:52 AM)I am the GOAT Wrote: I wouldn't send my children to a diocesan school if they paid me tens of thousands per year. I have known countless people who have lost their faith in those places. 

Yep, so many of them are losing their faith that our Diocesan Seminary is bursting at the seams and vocations to the religious life are booming. 
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#16
(11-19-2020, 11:09 AM)yablabo Wrote: I believe tuition at our parish school is $11K per year per student.  They do numerous fundraisers in order to reduce that for needy students as well as to buy superfluous things.

That said, I am opposed to schooling for children.  It’s no one’s business how parents choose to educate children.

That’s a very broad stroke.  Are you against all “traditional” forms of schooling?  I’m not for government school (public school should be called what it is), and we must evaluate parochial schools as well, but what are homeschooling parents to do when they’ve exhausted their personal knowledge and expertise?  Do they send 14 year old Billy to the library and hope for the best that he can figure out organic chemistry?

Also, what are the superfluous things the parish school buys?  I’m genuinely curious...
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#17
(11-19-2020, 11:23 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(11-19-2020, 05:52 AM)I am the GOAT Wrote: I wouldn't send my children to a diocesan school if they paid me tens of thousands per year. I have known countless people who have lost their faith in those places. 

Yep, so many of the are losing their faith that our Diocesan Seminary is bursting at the seams and vocations to the religious life are booming. 

Don’t feed the goats, I think they are feverishly looking for some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
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#18
(11-20-2020, 12:59 AM)Pandora Wrote:
(11-19-2020, 11:23 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(11-19-2020, 05:52 AM)I am the GOAT Wrote: I wouldn't send my children to a diocesan school if they paid me tens of thousands per year. I have known countless people who have lost their faith in those places. 

Yep, so many of the are losing their faith that our Diocesan Seminary is bursting at the seams and vocations to the religious life are booming. 

Don’t feed the goats, I think they are feverishly looking for some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

Or, if you choose to feed the goats, feed them some challa[h].
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#19
(11-20-2020, 12:56 AM)Pandora Wrote:
(11-19-2020, 11:09 AM)yablabo Wrote: I believe tuition at our parish school is $11K per year per student.  They do numerous fundraisers in order to reduce that for needy students as well as to buy superfluous things.

That said, I am opposed to schooling for children.  It’s no one’s business how parents choose to educate children.

That’s a very broad stroke.  Are you against all “traditional” forms of schooling?  I’m not for government school (public school should be called what it is), and we must evaluate parochial schools as well, but what are homeschooling parents to do when they’ve exhausted their personal knowledge and expertise?  Do they send 14 year old Billy to the library and hope for the best that he can figure out organic chemistry?

Also, what are the superfluous things the parish school buys?  I’m genuinely curious...
I’m opposed to all schooling.  That includes the notion that every 14-year-old Billy needs to take organic chemistry or any class.  If a child shows a special aptitude which could serve the common good, he could receive more formal education through tutors or the local college/university...but it is ridiculous to burden parents to school all their children to an arbitrary standard from either the government or the diocese.  As long as religious and civic education is conducted to form a child as both a good citizen of the state and of heaven, the parent has done his duty.  

Our parish school buys stuff like laptops or tablet computers for every student, and then brand new text books every year.  They also buy interactive digital whiteboards instead of regular marker boards or chalkboards.  Superfluous.
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#20
I'm raising my family in Utah. Here the public school system has a thing called seminary yes voluntary but it's literally teaching the mormon faith on school grounds. My wife has a bachelor's and masters degree in education. We took the pay cut and she teaches at our local Catholic school. Now we get a discount to send our children and I know it's her calling. She's helping instill a solid Catholic foundation in our youth. The school is not perfect, but it's better than the alternative. But I will also say a majority of the education is still happening at home with our children.
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