How do you afford Catholic school?
#5
(09-21-2019, 03:49 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: Or, you could move to the Diocese of Lincoln! Seriously, it doesn't have to be the way you describe it. The following is taken from 'Why Aren't Other Dioceses Looking to Lincoln?' from Liturgy Guy.


Quote:A Catholic Education

While I have saved this for last, in many ways education is the primary ingredient to Lincoln’s recipe for success. Bishop Glennon Flavin’s vision for a diocese that allowed its children to go to Catholic school at an affordable cost and to be taught authentic Catholicism by religious sisters and priests is integral to the diocesan mission.

While Lincoln’s Catholic population is less than 100,000, they have provided the faithful with 27 elementary schools and 6 high schools to educate the next generation. More importantly, most diocesan schools have at least 1-2 habited sisters and all Catholic schools are staffed by at least one priest.

As noted earlier, high school theology classes are only taught by priests and religious sisters. For example, the Catholic high school in Lincoln, Pius X, has over 1200 students and is staffed by 4 religious sisters (in traditional religious habits) and 15 priests who always wear their clerics. Each newly ordained priest can expect to teach high school for at least 5 years. Priests who are assigned to parishes in smaller towns with a Catholic high school are still expected to teach as well.

Unlike other dioceses which require school masses only once a week, or in some cases once a month, each grade school in the Diocese of Lincoln is required to offer daily mass for the entire school each day.

However, there may be no better example of Lincoln’s commitment to the future than the fact that it’s diocesan schools have some of the lowest tuition costs in the entire country. As an example, St. Teresa’s Catholic School in town has an annual tuition cost of only $100 per student, and yet it is a thriving school with a habited sister as principal.

As one local explained, “These good, solid, Catholic schools are the roots of the diocese and continue to pump out religious vocations and plain good Catholics, thanks to the work of our clergy, diocesan staff, and laity.”

Oh, and our Diocesan seminary is full, too.

They have to go where the work is....but I would have no problem with Lincoln.  Yes, I know it is in Nebraska.
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I do agree that the Church is missing the boat with tuition being so high.  Keeping the kids within "the Catholic system" makes being Catholic much easier in this society.  It is hard enough to keep them Catholic without surrounding the kids with the stuff they have to deal with in public school.
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Messages In This Thread
How do you afford Catholic school? - by MaryTN - 09-21-2019, 02:43 AM
RE: How do you afford Catholic school? - by MaryTN - 09-21-2019, 09:07 PM
RE: How do you afford Catholic school? - by Zedta - 09-22-2020, 02:53 PM



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