Help with Morning Sickness
#1
Hello ladies, as some of you may know, I am about 6 weeks pregnant with our first child. I am really suffering from all-day and all-night nausea and morning sickness. I throw up all the time and can't keep anything down, and my poor husband has had to eat fast food because the smell of anything cooking in the house makes me feel violently ill. 

I can't do my wifely duties very well because I literally just lie in bed all day and throw up (or constantly feel like it). I wasn't able to sit through mass this Sunday either. I feel very worthless and like a huge burden to my husband. I feel so guilty because he works so hard all day and comes home to me so sick I can't even get up to kiss him, much less make him a nice meal. 

I don't know how I'm going to get through this pregnancy! Every day drags when you feel constantly ill. I have to go to work every morning still and I'm not sure how much longer I'll be able to. I know a lot of women say that this ends around the second trimester, but some women have told me they threw up every day for nine months, and that's scaring the hell out of me. 

I just don't know how I'm going to get through this; I'm very frustrated and discouraged.


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#2
I'm not a lady, but I was a husband and am a father and grandfather and in my experience as a Nurse, I spent a lot of time around pregnant women. The early stages of pregnancy can be trying for some women, like yourself, for one. It does seem to get better over time and subsequent pregnancies seem less likely to give you these problems. I did a little research and found some tips that could help. These certainly helped my Dearly Departed Wife deal with the issue when she was pregnant with the first two pregnancies, so I thought you may benefit from them too.

Don't despair, as they say, "This too shall pass".


Helpful Do’s and Don’ts
Do:
  • Eat small meals often.
  • Drink fluids 1/2 hour before or after a meal, but not with meals.
  • Drink small amounts of fluids during the day to avoid dehydration.
  • Eat soda crackers 15 minutes before getting up in the morning.
  • Eat whatever you feel like eating, whenever you feel you can.
  • Ask someone else to cook for you; open the windows, or turn on fans if the odor bothers you.
  • Get plenty of rest and nap during the day.
  • Avoid warm places; feeling hot adds to nausea.
  • Sniff lemons or ginger, drink lemonade or eat watermelon to relieve nausea.
  • Eat salty potato chips; they have been found to settle stomachs enough to eat a meal.
  • Exercise
Don’ts:
  • Do not lie down after eating.
  • Do not skip meals.
  • Do not let this condition go untreated.
  • Do not cook or eat spicy food.
One should have an open mind; open enough that things get in, but not so open that everything falls out
Art Bell
 
The individual is handicapped by coming face to face with a conspiracy so monstrous that he cannot believe it exists.
J Edgar Hoover

 
I don't need a good memory, because I always tell the truth.
Jessie Ventura

 
Its no wonder truth is stranger than fiction.
Fiction has to make sense
Mark Twain

If history doesn't repeat itself, it sure does rhyme.
Mark Twain
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#3
I can only offer sympathy. My wife was completely out of commission from week 8 until about week 16 (she took 7 weeks off from work), still was miserable until around the 3rd trimester and even then still didn't feel that good and didn't have much of an appetite until giving birth. Her vomiting and dry heaves ended around week 20, but nausea just kept on going until the end.

I was eating food in the car and never allowed to cook. It was a pretty difficult time.

Every woman is different and unfortunately for some pregnancy is miserable throughout. Zofran is your friend, maybe give yogurt with probiotics and pickles that aren't made with vinegar (I think the Jewish brand Ba-tampte makes such pickles) a try. It helped my wife a bit in the 3rd trimester and I've read from other places that probiotic foods can help (can't really point to any scientific studies for this). Unfortunately, most such fermented foods have at least have a little bit of alcohol. Although these places also say that it's good for people who suffer from extreme morning sickness to include such foods as a staple to their non-pregnancy diets. So it's worth a shot anyway as long as you don't hate pickles, sauerkraut, kombucha, etc.
and as a man, I'll just say please be nice to your husband. Lastly, it's all worth it, so stick in there!
Blood of Christ, relief of the burdened, save us.

“It is my design to die in the brew house; let ale be placed in my mouth when I am expiring, that when the choirs of angels come, they may say, “Be God propitious to this drinker.” – St. Columbanus, A.D. 612

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#4
You’re carrying your husband’s child. You’re not burdening him any more than he’s burdening you. Get a barbecue grill and let him cook hamburgers and pork chops outside.
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#5
Oh, I remember the nausea. You have my sympathies and prayers. Certain scents and foods (which for your sake I won't name) would make it worse. Even thinking about these foods would make me so sick, let alone eating them. Just eat what you can; I bet you'll be feeling better soon.

Your body is doing something incredible right now, so cut yourself a break. If you're too sick for activity, it's simply necessary for you to rest. You don't need the added burden of feeling guilty for that. 

Feel better! It's nice to see you around the tank again!
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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#6
There is a reason it was normal in the past for pregnant women to stay home while pregnant.  Morning/all day-every day sickness is terrible, and normal.  I am sorry.
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Some women can eat, and work and just go on, happy and comfortable until the baby magically pops out - think Hollywood-types who Instagram their growing bumps and flowing-in-the-breeze hair while wearing skin tight leggings.  Most women aren't like those women.  Having a baby is a big deal, normal, but still, a big deal.
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Your husband will survive, after all, this is his baby you are gestating.  I found that going for walks in the fresh air helped; stale, inside air made me nauseous.  There is no rhyme or reason for who gets terrible morning sickness and who doesn't.  Saltine crackers seemed to help a little.  As someone else said, make sure you drink a lot of fluids, but know that soon you will be running to the bathroom very regularly since your bladder will be under pressure.
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Good luck.
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#7
Have you asked your family doctor about Diclectin or something like that?

My poor wife has been sick on both pregnancies.

It’s apparently a sign of a healthy pregnancy, in any event.

Anyways yeah, ask your doctor about some options if you haven’t done so already.
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#8
Diclectin can definitely help.
You just need to be up front with your doctor.
Say “I’m constantly sick, what are my options?”
Surely they can give you something to help with the nausea.
In the meantime, as hard as it may be, thank God for the suffering, and offer it up for the souls in purgatory.
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#9
(10-08-2019, 07:41 PM)FultonFan Wrote: Have you asked your family doctor about Diclectin or something like that?
In the 70s there was a drug for this called Bendectin, but was removed due to somewhat poorly substantiated birth defect claims. However, both my daughters have had skin problems and their Mom took Bendectin during their pregnancies. One daughter was born with a large hemangioma on her back, which required surgical removal at 3 months and an incontinentia pigmenti on her hip. Then there is her sister who now has psoriasis as an adult. Don't know if there is a connection, but when one is pregnant and takes medication, the forming baby in her womb gets the drugs too.

I don't know the pedigree of this new drug, since it is new and was released after I retired. I'd recommend good counseling with your OB/GYN.
One should have an open mind; open enough that things get in, but not so open that everything falls out
Art Bell
 
The individual is handicapped by coming face to face with a conspiracy so monstrous that he cannot believe it exists.
J Edgar Hoover

 
I don't need a good memory, because I always tell the truth.
Jessie Ventura

 
Its no wonder truth is stranger than fiction.
Fiction has to make sense
Mark Twain

If history doesn't repeat itself, it sure does rhyme.
Mark Twain
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#10
Usually the first line treatment for morning sickness is Vitamin B6 + Unisom (the doxylamine succinate) version. If that doesn't work then prescription meds are the next route.

My wife was taking Zofran (ondansetron) for her entire pregnancy for nausea. Didn't completely get rid of it (as I posted above she was still pretty miserable on it), but it helped take the edge off a bit. I believe she also was prescribed Promethazine, but she only took that a couple times for air travel. Zofran is supposed to be pretty safe, but either way, if you tell your OB that you're in really bad shape, they'll prescribe something based on your health history and all that good stuff. If your next OB appointment isn't until the 12 week checkup, then give them a call. They'll at least give you some advice of what to do/take.
Blood of Christ, relief of the burdened, save us.

“It is my design to die in the brew house; let ale be placed in my mouth when I am expiring, that when the choirs of angels come, they may say, “Be God propitious to this drinker.” – St. Columbanus, A.D. 612

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