Holy Days if no TLM: Plan B?
#1
You got a job. Say, one of the caring professions where a lot of people rely on you, not a temp or sub, to be there well before the official start of your assigned shift to set up and prep. And/or, no TLM near home or workplace. No OF evening masses the vigil before that day of obligation count, I am assuming; at least in my Archdiocese. I can't figure this discrepancy out, btw, even in post V2 observance. But said holy day, there's no more services held than any other weekday, at any NO parish. Discrepancy ditto. 

Your hours and commute in said vast Archdiocese limit your attendance options (very few EFs even on Sunday in this megapolis, most populous of American dioceses) to no TLM within your timeframe or traffic predicament, and even that local OF may not be feasible. What then, in terms of the First Commandment?

And, as some of you vow never more will you attend the Novus Ordo, what if your go-to Sunday TLM parish does not offer a weekday or holy day service? If under such circumstances as I detailed, how do you reconcile your obligation with the lack of EF masses, if OF is within range?

I feel guilty if I'd either not take one for the Decalogue team and get thee me to a local parish if necessary or excuse my obligation by my "private judgement" making me feel like one of PF's Pharisees.

Reason is I was chastised by a confessor for not meeting my duty this past summer, the last holy day. I'd left for work before dawn and returned near midnight. I may have to work days and nights, alternately at two sites, with commutes that may be 3 or 3.5 plus hours daily. He asked me why. I work two jobs, I replied. Do you have to?, he inquired. Yes, I answered. 

P.S. I'm newish here so I looked for this topic in the forum search but oddly not even "Holy Days" resulted in any hits. Thanks for your guidance.  Blessed Hallows Eve + Day, and All Souls.
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#2
Obligations imposed by Divine Law and Natural Law (which is just the expression of Divine Law through our Nature) bind always and everywhere, because the will of God takes into consideration all circumstances. Thus the Third Commandment to Keep Holy the Lord's Day, must always be kept. If you are conscious, you have to do something on a Sunday or Day of Obligation to sanctify this day, no matter what.

Human laws cannot ever take consideration of all circumstances, so admit of certain exceptions, especially in grave difficulty or inconvenience. Church law is a kind of human law, and so is the obligation to omit unnecessary servile work and attend Mass on Sundays and Days of Obligation. This duty will admit of exceptions, such as necessary work, or the care of the sick or others, or distance, or sickness, etc.

While you must always do something to sanctify your Sunday or Holy Day (since that is from Divine Law), if you cannot attend Mass or omit work without serious difficulty or inconvenience, then you are no longer bound by the Mass obligation or to omit the servile work.

You should ideally try to avoid having to work on such days. Consider taking a vacation day. But if this is truly impossible or seriously difficult to do you would be excused.

The confessor was wrong to chastise you. You clearly had to work these jobs and had no reasonable opportunity to attend Mass. You had no obligation to do so, and every major traditional moral theologian would agree with this. If there was not any physical impossibility, there certainly was a moral impossibility (a grave inconvenience).

St Alphonsus says: "Any cause which is moderately grave excuses from this precept—namely, any reason which involves some notable invconvenience or harm to mind or body eith of oneself or another." (Theologia moralis, III, n.324)

Jone will write that : "The following are excused : the sick, convalescents, persons who cannot endure the air in the church (e.g. certain neurotic persons and sometimes pregnant women in the first or last months of pregnancy); those that have a long way to church, people hindered by the duties of their state (e.g. shepherds, watchmen, policemen on duty, cooks, and those working in the mills that may not shut down over Sunday); women or children who would incur the grave displeasure of their husbands or parents by attending Mass; servants whose masters do not permit them to attend Mass ...; those that care for the sick, rescue workers in time of fire or flood; and those who have reason to think that by staying home they can hinder sin; or who would suffer injury to their good name or possessions by going to Church. (Thus: unmarried women who are pregnant, may remain at home if by doing so they can avoid disgrace; similarly, those who lack clothing becoming to their social standing; those on a journey; those who would suffer the loss of extraordinary gain by attending Mass)."

Clearly many are excused when there is some reasonably serious difficulty.

As regards Novus Ordo or Traditional Mass, people know here that I think that often the Novus Ordo can be a serious harm to the faith of certain people. Clearly you cannot endanger your Faith for any reason, so if this is your understanding , you would be right to omit attendance, even on a Holy Day or Sunday if you could not access a Mass that were not. If you do not think that this is the case and that the Novus Ordo is not this danger, you would be obliged to go if you could. It is a matter of conscience. 

It is also worth noting that priest are obliged each day to say their Divine Office under pain of grave sin. One excuse for omitting it is that their pastoral duties called them out for a large part of the day and they only returned late. Even if they still have some time left in the day, if it would deprive them of necessary sleep or rest to stay up and recite the Breviary, they would be excused. By analogy, it is hard to then turn around and tell people that they have to come to Mass even if working from before dawn to after midnight. In that situation a priest would not have to say his Breviary, so why should a layman have to attend Mass?
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#3
(10-29-2019, 10:44 PM)Yes Fionnchu Wrote: You got a job. Say, one of the caring professions where a lot of people rely on you, not a temp or sub, to be there well before the official start of your assigned shift to set up and prep. And/or, no TLM near home or workplace. No OF evening masses the vigil before that day of obligation count, I am assuming; at least in my Archdiocese. I can't figure this discrepancy out, btw, even in post V2 observance. But said holy day, there's no more services held than any other weekday, at any NO parish. Discrepancy ditto. 

Your hours and commute in said vast Archdiocese limit your attendance options (very few EFs even on Sunday in this megapolis, most populous of American dioceses) to no TLM within your timeframe or traffic predicament, and even that local OF may not be feasible. What then, in terms of the First Commandment?

And, as some of you vow never more will you attend the Novus Ordo, what if your go-to Sunday TLM parish does not offer a weekday or holy day service? If under such circumstances as I detailed, how do you reconcile your obligation with the lack of EF masses, if OF is within range?

I feel guilty if I'd either not take one for the Decalogue team and get thee me to a local parish if necessary or excuse my obligation by my "private judgement" making me feel like one of PF's Pharisees.

Reason is I was chastised by a confessor for not meeting my duty this past summer, the last holy day. I'd left for work before dawn and returned near midnight. I may have to work days and nights, alternately at two sites, with commutes that may be 3 or 3.5 plus hours daily. He asked me why. I work two jobs, I replied. Do you have to?, he inquired. Yes, I answered. 

P.S. I'm newish here so I looked for this topic in the forum search but oddly not even "Holy Days" resulted in any hits. Thanks for your guidance.  Blessed Hallows Eve + Day, and All Souls.

Hey there, the valid exemptions for not meeting your Sunday obligations include, sickness, tending to small children, and impossibility due to distance. There are also exemptions for duties of state (emergency services workers), and for charity reasons such as care of the sick or elderly. There are also prudential reasons; If you live in Canada or the Northern USA, and there is a snowstorm where authorities advise you to stay off the road, the priest expects you will comply with instructions and stay off the road, even if it’s a holy day of obligation.  By your description, it sounds like you validly meet the criteria for exemption, so I would ask your priest for further context to ensure he is not misunderstanding your circumstances. 

I am one who will not attend a mass other than at an SSPX chapel, based upon the direction of the priests where I obtain the sacraments, and where I receive my catechism instruction. I don’t advocate that position to you or anyone here, I only say this because I have felt the impacts of not being able to meet my Sunday obligation, for circumstances as simple as family vacations or out of town weekend visits to family.  As my prior said, this is another weight on the conscience of the faithful that can be attributed to Vatican ll. 60 years ago, there were very few places in the developed world where you could go and not be a stones throw from a valid catholic mass. That is no longer the case. There are just not that many people within close proximity to a TLM, and It impacts all aspects of life for a faithful catholic.
"Why does your teacher eat with tax collectors and sinners?" On hearing this, Jesus said, "It is not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick. But go and learn what this means: 'I desire mercy, not sacrifice.' For I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners."  Matthew 9:10-14
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#4
This is kind of the moral dilemma I'm in right now. My SSPX parish has a TLM on Friday, but it's at 6pm and I work 2 to 11 during the week and am all out of PTO. So that's not an option. My only option really is to attend a NO before work, but given that the NO really impacts my faith (vs populum, vernacular, communion in hand are all things that shake my faith ) I don't really see it as a wise option for me.

Do I go to an NO just to tick the "holy day of obligation day box" (which never, ever seems right to me) or forgo it altogether and recite the Hours in my Monastic Diurnal with an act of spiritual communion?
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

Put not your trust in princes: In the children of men, in whom there is no salvation. - Ps. 145:2-3

"For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables." - 2 Timothy 4:3-4
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#5
(10-30-2019, 11:23 PM)Augustinian Wrote: ...recite the Hours in my Monastic Diurnal with an act of spiritual communion?

In the 19th century, many servants were Irish Catholics in protestant households. Many masters would deliberately give their servants a day off on any day but Sunday to prevent them from attending Mass. I have had several prayer books from the time that addressed the problem. They all recommended reading the Prayers of the Mass and making a Spiritual Communion.
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#6
Thanks, all for responding. I follow the "moral impediment" argument on FE closely; as a relative neophyte to the practices around the TLM, I am learning what I'd never before knew.

What I cannot get my head around is why on Holy Days there aren't more masses (of any rite)? My local parish has the same daily mass for the "obligatory" morning, and adds just one more at night. It seems as if the Church figures most of its congregants aren't going to make it to mass anyhow on off-Sundays. Maybe it comes down to supply + demand?
The deeds you do may be the only sermon some people may hear today (Francis of Assisi); Win an argument, lose a soul (Fulton Sheen)
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#7
FSSP livemass.net   :)
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#8
(10-31-2019, 05:14 PM)Sacred Heart lover Wrote: FSSP livemass.net   :)

I was considering this option as well, plus sending my guardian angel in my stead  :salute:
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

Put not your trust in princes: In the children of men, in whom there is no salvation. - Ps. 145:2-3

"For there shall be a time, when they will not endure sound doctrine; but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears: And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables." - 2 Timothy 4:3-4
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#9
(10-31-2019, 05:14 PM)Sacred Heart lover Wrote: FSSP livemass.net   :)

This, and other streaming Masses (the SSPX has the earliest one in the world since it streams from New Zealand at 9:00 am on a Sunday, thus it's still on Saturday most everywhere else) is always a good way of sanctifying the Sunday or Holy Day if you cannot make Mass, but let's be clear it's not a substitute for Mass. You cannot fulfill your obligation by watching a televised or streamed Mass.

The obligation is physical presence and at least sufficient attention for the essential part of the Mass (Offertory to Dismissal). If that is morally or physically impossible, you no longer have any obligation.

Your obligation cannot be fulfilled, because it does not exist any more.

The Divine Law, however, commands we do something to sanctify the day, and this could be done by watching the Mass, but it could be done in a myriad of other ways, and you have no obligation to watch a Mass in such a case.

Those distinctions are important, because it deals with peoples' consciences.
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#10
I used to just pray the Breviary. When I was Catholic hands down THE most important thing for me spiritually- - my lifeblood-- was the Divine Office. I used to try to pray the full Office, Matins through Compline during feasts and as much as possible on regular days.  I didn't always get through everything but the Breviary helps sanctify your day, hour by hour, season by season.  If I had to give any advice on this matter it would be hands down to pray the Office. St. Benedict had it right when he said to his monks,  "Let us prefer nothing whatsoever to the Work of God(i.e . the Divine Office).
Walk before God in simplicity, and not in subtleties of the mind. Simplicity brings faith; but subtle and intricate speculations bring conceit; and conceit brings withdrawal from God. -Saint Isaac of Syria, Directions on Spiritual Training


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