Catholic Sex-Ed
#1
Hello all, wondering how the parents in here respectfully taught their kids about sex from a Catholic worldview. 

My husband and I were both raised Catholic but our parents never taught us anything about sex or corrected us touching ourselves when we were very small. I still struggle with masturbation to this very day. 

How do you teach young children (especially boys) that touching themselves inappropriately is not pleasing to God without making them ashamed or overly curious about their genitals? From my experience, if my parents made a big deal about something and told me not to do it without giving me a good explanation, it only made me want to do it more. I also don't want to lie to them or scare them and tell them that touching themselves "makes Jesus very sad," or that it will make them sick, or something like that. 

I'm going to be having a baby boy soon and I've heard that they love touching their penis (I mean, if I had one I would be fascinated with it too, LOL) so I want to make sure our son has a positive view of his body but also learns to respect it for the beautiful soul that God created him to be. My husband grew up with a very negative view of his body and men in general, and I don't want that to happen to our son (or any of our subsequent children, God willing we have more).
St. Joseph, Terror of Demons, Pillar of Families, Glory of Domestic Life, Pray for Us!

When I was a kid my parents moved a lot, but I always found them.
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#2
One way to explain things is try to portray each body part as having a specific purpose and should be treated accordingly. If a person would not wear sandles while trekking Anarctica, one should respect the genitals for their biological purpose: keeping the human race going.

Wet dreams exist for a reason. When I was a teenager I was never told they were not sinful, so I would clean up and say an Act of Contrition before going back to sleep. Let your son know in afvance that his body was designed to deal with seminal build-up and that's why he doesn't need to resort to illicit thought to pleasure himself.
Ihave to head to work, so I'll try to type more later.
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#3
We put a lot of emphasis on the fact that God made you the way you are.  Body parts are natural, normal, all boys have them.  We make sure to avoid implying that body parts, or bodies in general, are somehow bad or dirty.
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We also teach modesty.  With little guys this is kinda' hard because as I said before, they like to be naked or very lightly dressed at home.  So we start with "at home is OK, but in public we wear clothes". You can be scantily clad at home with parents, but when grandma comes over, you will wear clothes.
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We start telling them about the changes that will happen to their bodies before the changes happen.  Puberty is a process, so before the first hair appears, they know this will happen.  Daddy has hair everywhere, it is a guy thing, it means you are growing up, it is good!  Look at all the men around, they have hair everywhere, it is normal, you are supposed to have this.  As far as penis related issues, again, this is part of the maturity of the body.  This is normal. We do not do the kindergarten version of sex ed, they don't care and it gets them focusing on the wrong thing. They do know that boys and girls are different, but we don't talk about private parts being different, just that boys and girls are different and that boys have to be careful and more gentle with girls - they can't play as roughly with girls as they can with boys. Boys like to be told they are big and strong and have big muscles so they have to be careful with girls (girls are usually smaller in frame).
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We tend to treat everything as matter-of-fact.  Liking girls is normal and healthy.
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Growing up I had one "facts of life" lesson with my mother and it had NOTHING to do with the facts of life, it was about getting my period and napkins, etc.  Nothing at all about sex, sexual attraction, boys are cute and that is OK, look but don't touch....but lots of things were sins......
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The last facts of life talk I had with a child was at the very beginning of puberty.  It involved a pencil and paper to give a basic diagram about the insides of bodies and how babies get inside of Mama.  There was a bit of "eewww" but the child was the one asking questions and it was not forced.  Biological questions were answered very matter of factly.  HOWEVER, we spend a great deal of time talking about what love really means.  True love is not about using someone else's body just because you can, or just because you are both curious. True love means wanting what is best for the other person, sacrificing your wants for the other person.   There are consequences to doing this, especially when you are still a kid at home.  Do you want to be a daddy when you are 14?  Do you want to have to go to work to buy diapers?  Do you want to change poopy diapers? (poopy diaper talk is very effective here)
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I also use Google to find images and diagrams. I like to show the children what babies look like at the different times of gestation, because babies are real babies, not blobs to be aborted because the adults had a bad night. If you make a baby, you care for your baby until your baby is an adult, and then someday you get to be a grandpa and do silly grandpa stuff. Most babies are accidents, but those babies are still loved, valued and wanted.
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It is a process. You can do this. It will be OK.
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