Sheen Beatification Delay an Act of ‘Sabotage,’ Peoria Official Writes
#1
From the Catholic Herald

By Catholic News Agency

After the Diocese of Rochester last week confirmed it had requested that the beatification of Venerable Fulton Sheen be delayed, a longtime Peoria diocese official is accusing the Rochester diocese of repeatedly “sabotaging” Sheen’s sainthood cause.

“Under the veneer of the Rochester diocese’s call for caution, more than an overwhelming majority of people would conclude that it is an unexplainable act of sabotage — a sabotage that simply hurts the faithful,” Monsignor James Kruse, an official in the Diocese of Peoria involved in advancing Sheen’s cause, wrote in a lengthy Dec. 7 op-ed.

Venerable Fulton Sheen was an American archbishop and television personality who was set to be beatified Dec. 21. The Holy See made the decision to postpone the beatification on Dec. 2, with the Peoria diocese attributing the Vatican’s decision to “a few members of the Bishop’s Conference who have asked for further consideration.”

CNA first reported Dec. 4 that it was Bishop Salvatore Matano of Rochester who asked the apostolic nuncio to the United States to delay the beatification, citing concerns about an ongoing state attorney general’s investigation into the dioceses of New York state.

“Rochester diocese’s revelation of these undisclosed cases simply follows the same pattern that the Rochester diocese has executed since this past spring,” Kruse wrote.

“This pattern is simple: The Sheen Cause takes a step forward and then the Rochester diocese acts to block the Beatification. When examining the pattern it is hard not to believe that the diocese of Rochester acts more to sabotage the Cause and less to protect the good of the Church.”

In September 2018, New York’s attorney general began an investigation into whether any of the state’s eight Roman Catholic dioceses had covered up acts or allegations of clerical sexual abuse. Sheen was Bishop of Rochester from 1966 to 1969.

Kruse says he was first contacted by the Rochester diocese in March 2019 by “Fr. Dan Conlon, Vicar General of the diocese of Rochester,” who told him that the Diocese of Rochester had submitted documents to the attorney general of New York which “may possibly implicate Sheen in appointing priests to assignments while having knowledge that these priests had abused children.”

Kruse is likely referring to the chancellor of the Rochester diocese, Father Dan Condon.

The Peoria diocese and the New York archdiocese were earlier this year engaged in a legal fight in civil court over Sheen’s final burial place, which ended on June 7, 2019 when the Superior Court of New York denied any further appeals. His remains arrived in Peoria later that month.

The day after the court’s final ruling, Kruse wrote, on June 8, 2019, the Diocese of Rochester submitted to Peoria the documents regarding Sheen’s administration related to two clerics known to have previously abused youth. Kruse wrote that the Diocese of Peoria believed that those documents were also submitted to the Vatican for their review.

Kruse wrote that the Vatican unofficially set a date for Sheen’s beatification for Sept. 20, 2019 but did not present an official decree.

On July 24, 2019, the Diocese of Peoria was informed that the Vatican’s Secretary of State had delayed the Beatification of Sheen “until the Congregation [for] the Causes of Saints is able to study this issue.”

Kruse says the “issue” in question was the set of documents from the Rochester diocese.

“After Matano blocked the Beatification unofficially scheduled in September, [Bishop] Jenky of Peoria gathered together a group to examine the documents. I was involved in this examination. This examination revealed that [Bishop] Sheen acted rightly and did not place children in harm’s way.”

The Rochester diocese said in its Dec. 5 release that it provided documentation to the Diocese of Peoria and the Congregation for the Causes of Saints through the Office of the Apostolic Nuncio, expressing concern about the advancement of Sheen’s cause “without a further review of his role in priests’ assignments.”

“The Diocese of Rochester did its due diligence in this matter and believed that, while not casting suspicion, it was prudent that Archbishop Sheen’s cause receive further study and deliberation, while also acknowledging the competency of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints to render its decision. The Holy See ultimately decided to postpone the beatification,” the diocese said.

The diocese said that Matano had requested a delay “prior to any announcements of the beatification.”

But Kruse, along with two other officials connected to the beatification cause, told CNA that Matano had also raised his concerns after the date was set. Kruse wrote that Matano did so both in person to an official from the nuncio’s office in Washington DC, and later in an official letter.

Kruse told CNA that Matano sent the letter in question to the apostolic nuncio Nov. 19, after the beatification was announced, saying that he could not support the scheduled beatification and requesting that it be delayed.

According to Kruse, a copy of this letter was also sent to Bishop Daniel Jenky of Peoria, Cardinal Angelo Becchiu, prefect of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints, and Cardinals Timothy Dolan of New York and Blase Cupich of Chicago.

“When I read this letter I immediately remembered Matano telling me in July that the case is now in the hands of Rome. We must wait for the conclusion of their investigation and abide by their decision. His earlier words rang hollow as I read his letter that again has blocked Sheen’s Beatification,” Kruse wrote.

CNA requested a copy of the Nov. 19 letter from the Diocese of Rochester. The diocese told CNA Dec. 5 that “it is not appropriate to release a letter addressed to the Apostolic Nuncio.”

The Democrat and Chronicle, a Rochester newspaper, reported Dec. 4 that the Rochester diocese had stated to the paper that Sheen’s handling of the cases of not just of Guli but also “two or more accused priests” deserved “more investigation.” The article goes on to speculate that there could be more than a dozen such cases.

The case of former Rochester priest Gerard Guli was the main focus of the documents submitted by the Diocese of Rochester, Kruse said.

The former priest was ordained in 1956, and from 1963 to 1967 served in parishes in West Virginia. According to a document issued by the Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston, in 1963 the Diocese of Rochester received an allegation that in 1960 Guli committed abuse or misconduct against adults, not minors.

Kruse told CNA that the priest “returned from Wheeling to help his sick parents” in 1967.

Sheen became Rochester’s bishop in October 1966.

Some have claimed that Sheen gave Guli an assignment in the Diocese of Rochester, despite the 1963 allegation against him, Kruse said, and that Bishop Matano was concerned the NY attorney general would identify this issue in any report or announcement. But Kruse said that Sheen never assigned Guli to ministry, and reiterated in his op-ed that the case was thoroughly vetted and “Sheen did nothing wrong.”

Kruse also mentioned the case of another former priest, John Gormley, who abused youth in 1969 and whom Sheen immediately removed from ministry when the abuse was reported. Gormley later left the priesthood and again, Kruse says, it was determined that “Sheen did nothing wrong.”

“Regretfully, it appears that only after receiving the attorney general’s approval will Sheen enjoy Beatification,” Kruse wrote.

“We also must wait to see if the Rochester diocese’s established pattern will continue even after this report.”

Kruse concluded his op-ed by exhorting the faithful to follow Sheen’s example.

“Both the Vatican and the Peoria diocese have confirmed that Sheen did not put children in harm’s way. The Vatican also has confirmed that Sheen’s intercession raised a baby from the dead. The diocese of Peoria constantly receives reports of more miracles that are attributed to the help and intercession of Sheen,” Kruse wrote.

“I am confident that Sheen’s Beatification will eventually take place. Regretfully, certain forces are now inexplicably causing its delay…may Fulton Sheen pray for us.”
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
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#2
Peoria and NY want this beatification.
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There is a problem from some period of his work.  It needs to be cleared up.  I would be so sad for his beatification to proceed, get the press coverage and then a problem comes up - probably a problem he had nothing to do with and was completely unaware of.  But if a problem comes up the press with go nuts with it.  Fulton Sheens name will be dragged thru the mud.  Millions of Catholics will be devastated that such accusations now include Fulton Sheen.  Non-Catholics will enjoy pointing their fingers at "yet another Catholic sex creep".
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Noone in the press will cover the part of the story that completely clears Fulton Sheen.
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So be patient.
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#3
Sounds like this would have been standard before John Paul II simplified the process. There’s no way any bishop from the last part of last century could even be considered for sainthood without investigating whether he was involved in covering up child abuse. I hope Sheen didn’t. And if he did, maybe he was only doing what the psychologists told him, or he repented of it and is in heaven, but that wouldn’t make him a good example, certainly not now. Causes have been stopped for far less. Better to be sure.
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#4
(12-09-2019, 11:39 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: From the Catholic Herald

By Catholic News Agency

After the Diocese of Rochester last week confirmed it had requested that the beatification of Venerable Fulton Sheen be delayed, a longtime Peoria diocese official is accusing the Rochester diocese of repeatedly “sabotaging” Sheen’s sainthood cause.

“Under the veneer of the Rochester diocese’s call for caution, more than an overwhelming majority of people would conclude that it is an unexplainable act of sabotage — a sabotage that simply hurts the faithful,” Monsignor James Kruse, an official in the Diocese of Peoria involved in advancing Sheen’s cause, wrote in a lengthy Dec. 7 op-ed.

Venerable Fulton Sheen was an American archbishop and television personality who was set to be beatified Dec. 21. The Holy See made the decision to postpone the beatification on Dec. 2, with the Peoria diocese attributing the Vatican’s decision to “a few members of the Bishop’s Conference who have asked for further consideration.”

CNA first reported Dec. 4 that it was Bishop Salvatore Matano of Rochester who asked the apostolic nuncio to the United States to delay the beatification, citing concerns about an ongoing state attorney general’s investigation into the dioceses of New York state.

“Rochester diocese’s revelation of these undisclosed cases simply follows the same pattern that the Rochester diocese has executed since this past spring,” Kruse wrote.

“This pattern is simple: The Sheen Cause takes a step forward and then the Rochester diocese acts to block the Beatification. When examining the pattern it is hard not to believe that the diocese of Rochester acts more to sabotage the Cause and less to protect the good of the Church.”

In September 2018, New York’s attorney general began an investigation into whether any of the state’s eight Roman Catholic dioceses had covered up acts or allegations of clerical sexual abuse. Sheen was Bishop of Rochester from 1966 to 1969.

Kruse says he was first contacted by the Rochester diocese in March 2019 by “Fr. Dan Conlon, Vicar General of the diocese of Rochester,” who told him that the Diocese of Rochester had submitted documents to the attorney general of New York which “may possibly implicate Sheen in appointing priests to assignments while having knowledge that these priests had abused children.”

Kruse is likely referring to the chancellor of the Rochester diocese, Father Dan Condon.

The Peoria diocese and the New York archdiocese were earlier this year engaged in a legal fight in civil court over Sheen’s final burial place, which ended on June 7, 2019 when the Superior Court of New York denied any further appeals. His remains arrived in Peoria later that month.

The day after the court’s final ruling, Kruse wrote, on June 8, 2019, the Diocese of Rochester submitted to Peoria the documents regarding Sheen’s administration related to two clerics known to have previously abused youth. Kruse wrote that the Diocese of Peoria believed that those documents were also submitted to the Vatican for their review.

Kruse wrote that the Vatican unofficially set a date for Sheen’s beatification for Sept. 20, 2019 but did not present an official decree.

On July 24, 2019, the Diocese of Peoria was informed that the Vatican’s Secretary of State had delayed the Beatification of Sheen “until the Congregation [for] the Causes of Saints is able to study this issue.”

Kruse says the “issue” in question was the set of documents from the Rochester diocese.

“After Matano blocked the Beatification unofficially scheduled in September, [Bishop] Jenky of Peoria gathered together a group to examine the documents. I was involved in this examination. This examination revealed that [Bishop] Sheen acted rightly and did not place children in harm’s way.”

The Rochester diocese said in its Dec. 5 release that it provided documentation to the Diocese of Peoria and the Congregation for the Causes of Saints through the Office of the Apostolic Nuncio, expressing concern about the advancement of Sheen’s cause “without a further review of his role in priests’ assignments.”

“The Diocese of Rochester did its due diligence in this matter and believed that, while not casting suspicion, it was prudent that Archbishop Sheen’s cause receive further study and deliberation, while also acknowledging the competency of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints to render its decision. The Holy See ultimately decided to postpone the beatification,” the diocese said.

The diocese said that Matano had requested a delay “prior to any announcements of the beatification.”

But Kruse, along with two other officials connected to the beatification cause, told CNA that Matano had also raised his concerns after the date was set. Kruse wrote that Matano did so both in person to an official from the nuncio’s office in Washington DC, and later in an official letter.

Kruse told CNA that Matano sent the letter in question to the apostolic nuncio Nov. 19, after the beatification was announced, saying that he could not support the scheduled beatification and requesting that it be delayed.

According to Kruse, a copy of this letter was also sent to Bishop Daniel Jenky of Peoria, Cardinal Angelo Becchiu, prefect of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints, and Cardinals Timothy Dolan of New York and Blase Cupich of Chicago.

“When I read this letter I immediately remembered Matano telling me in July that the case is now in the hands of Rome. We must wait for the conclusion of their investigation and abide by their decision. His earlier words rang hollow as I read his letter that again has blocked Sheen’s Beatification,” Kruse wrote.

CNA requested a copy of the Nov. 19 letter from the Diocese of Rochester. The diocese told CNA Dec. 5 that “it is not appropriate to release a letter addressed to the Apostolic Nuncio.”

The Democrat and Chronicle, a Rochester newspaper, reported Dec. 4 that the Rochester diocese had stated to the paper that Sheen’s handling of the cases of not just of Guli but also “two or more accused priests” deserved “more investigation.” The article goes on to speculate that there could be more than a dozen such cases.

The case of former Rochester priest Gerard Guli was the main focus of the documents submitted by the Diocese of Rochester, Kruse said.

The former priest was ordained in 1956, and from 1963 to 1967 served in parishes in West Virginia. According to a document issued by the Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston, in 1963 the Diocese of Rochester received an allegation that in 1960 Guli committed abuse or misconduct against adults, not minors.

Kruse told CNA that the priest “returned from Wheeling to help his sick parents” in 1967.

Sheen became Rochester’s bishop in October 1966.

Some have claimed that Sheen gave Guli an assignment in the Diocese of Rochester, despite the 1963 allegation against him, Kruse said, and that Bishop Matano was concerned the NY attorney general would identify this issue in any report or announcement. But Kruse said that Sheen never assigned Guli to ministry, and reiterated in his op-ed that the case was thoroughly vetted and “Sheen did nothing wrong.”

Kruse also mentioned the case of another former priest, John Gormley, who abused youth in 1969 and whom Sheen immediately removed from ministry when the abuse was reported. Gormley later left the priesthood and again, Kruse says, it was determined that “Sheen did nothing wrong.”

“Regretfully, it appears that only after receiving the attorney general’s approval will Sheen enjoy Beatification,” Kruse wrote.

“We also must wait to see if the Rochester diocese’s established pattern will continue even after this report.”

Kruse concluded his op-ed by exhorting the faithful to follow Sheen’s example.

“Both the Vatican and the Peoria diocese have confirmed that Sheen did not put children in harm’s way. The Vatican also has confirmed that Sheen’s intercession raised a baby from the dead. The diocese of Peoria constantly receives reports of more miracles that are attributed to the help and intercession of Sheen,” Kruse wrote.

“I am confident that Sheen’s Beatification will eventually take place. Regretfully, certain forces are now inexplicably causing its delay…may Fulton Sheen pray for us.”


Funnily, Bishop Sheen dies and EWTN is founded months later by Mother Angelica, (who couldn't be more different from Bishop Sheen if she tried), as if it were planned that way. 

Then, and now, EWTN broadcasts Bishop Sheen to new generations.

It's were I first heard of him. 

Gives one pause. 

https://celebratesheen.com/novena/
Oh, where are the snows of yesteryear!
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#5
Paul Wrote:Sounds like this would have been standard before John Paul II simplified the process. There’s no way any bishop from the last part of last century could even be considered for sainthood without investigating whether he was involved in covering up child abuse. I hope Sheen didn’t. And if he did, maybe he was only doing what the psychologists told him, or he repented of it and is in heaven, but that wouldn’t make him a good example, certainly not now. Causes have been stopped for far less. Better to be sure.

This. I absolutely agree.

Of course, there wouldn't be a ring of conspiracy to the delay if the same two dioceses hadn't been involved in a dramatic pissing contest, I mean litigation, over where the good Archbishop's earthly remains should be buried.
-sent by howitzer via the breech.

God's love is manifest in the landscape as in a face.  - John Muir

I want creation to penetrate you with so much admiration that wherever you go, the least plant may bring you clear remembrance of the Creator.  A single plant, a blade of grass, or one speck of dust is sufficient to occupy all your intelligence in beholding the art with which it has been made  - Saint Basil

Heaven is under our feet, as well as over our heads. - Thoreau, Walden
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#6
Ven Fulton Sheen said that every priest is a Jacob's ladder, someone who connects heaven & earth. You must be able to travel down far enough to reach even the most lost of the lost, & you must be able at the same time to reach up high enough to facilitate the journey to heaven

"Those who see that all human life is nothing but Divine Love on pilgrimage will use it as a kind of Jacob's ladder to climb back again through virtue to the source of all love which is God himself." - Ven. Fulton Sheen

"But God does say, 'Wrestle with Me, as Jacob did. Give Me no rest.'" ~Bishop Fulton Sheen

++++++++++++++

The FBI kept a file on Catholic bishop, Fulton Sheen, who was from Illinois and was well known in the Cold War era as an evangelizer and anti-communist. (& might I add, a long time civil-rights leader, and a anti-Vietnam-War supporter)

The late Bishop Fulton Sheen.  Sun-Times files 

He maintained a close relationship and frequent correspondence with longtime FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. In one letter in Sheen’s file, he told Hoover, “You have built up a tradition toward divine justice in this country which has been incomparable in the life of free peoples.”

A week later, Hoover wrote back, saying, “I want you to know that any success my associates and I may have attained can be attributed to a great extent to the staunch support of good friends such as you.”

Also in Sheen’s file was a very personal biography on the prelate, dated 1953.

“The Bishop has little or no social life. He eats usually in twenty to twenty five minutes. He tries to save morning hours for creative work, sees callers in the afternoon, and in the evenings does reading and research . . . He became famous for the conversion to Catholicism of famous people, including Clare Boothe Luce, Ambassador to Italy; and Henry Ford, II; also converted Louis Budenz, former Editor-in-Chief of the Communist ‘Daily Worker.’ . . . The Bishop likes chocolate ice cream and angel-food cake.”

“He also likes to roam about the kitchen in the homes of friends when he is visiting. He likes to play tennis and always dressed the part, with white scarf and white flannel trousers, and was a fashion plate on the court even though his game was not always up to par . . . The Bishop was one of the outspoken prominent Americans who, in his lectures and on the radio, opposed both Nazism and Communism back in the 1930s. He is very human and very humble.”

--------------

Did Spelly sell his birthright for a powdered milk mess to a fellow who liked to roam about kitchens? After all Vn. Sheen did receive the nod not once, but twice, from Papa Pius, & if you remember; Esau got pretty sore too.

++++++++++++++

Oh my blessed Mother, not one sword only, but as many swords as I have committed sins have I added to those seven in Thy Heart. Ah, my Lady, Thy sorrows are not due to Thee who art innocent, but to me who am guilty. But since Thou hast wished to suffer so much for me, ah, by Thy merits obtain for me great sorrow for my sins, and patience under the trials of this life, which will always be light in comparison with my demerits, for I have often merited Hell. Amen.
Oh, where are the snows of yesteryear!
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#7
(12-10-2019, 11:38 AM)Paul Wrote: Sounds like this would have been standard before John Paul II simplified the process. There’s no way any bishop from the last part of last century could even be considered for sainthood without investigating whether he was involved in covering up child abuse. I hope Sheen didn’t. And if he did, maybe he was only doing what the psychologists told him, or he repented of it and is in heaven, but that wouldn’t make him a good example, certainly not now. Causes have been stopped for far less. Better to be sure.

As I understand it, there have been two in depth investigations of the matter, both of which came up clean. The real problem is that the Cheese Head is determined that if anyone is going to profit from the pilgrims it's going to be New York.
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
“Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'
FishEaters Group on MeWe
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#8
Information Age Malady
One of the media technology-related behaviors now-a-days is that consumers look to media technology for approval on everything; from talking about the weather to the elevation of a soul to sainthood. And yet it's all bloviations, that will soon be forgotten, so why anyone gives media technology's opinions any merit is beyond me. ) - :

Yet unfortunately consumers do.
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